Boston Public Library
Exhibitions

At the Central Library

Back to School: Geography in the Classroom

BacktoSchool_extractedbannergraphic_300Central Library, Copley Square (Norman B. Leventhal Map Center)
September 2, 2014 to January 25, 2015
Monday–Thursday: 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Friday–Saturday:10 a.m.–5 p.m.,
Sunday: 1–5 p.m.

American schoolchildren have studied geography since the late 18th century. Traditionally viewed as an essential subject for boys’ and girls’ education, geography was taught to children in primary school, and to young adults studying in high school and college settings.

In this exhibition of forty maps, globes, games, atlases and related objects, visitors will follow the evolution of geographic education, examine the visual aids used by teachers in the classroom, and marvel at unique student-produced geography projects from the late 18th to the 20th centuries.

 

LouvertureThe Soul of a Man: Toussaint Louverture & the Haitian Slave Revolt

Central Library, Copley Square (Rare Books Lobby)
June 17 to September 30, 2014
Monday–Friday: 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

Toussaint Louverture was born a slave in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) in 1743. Although he had no formal education or military training, Louverture became a brilliant, tactical general who once won seven battles in seven days. As a leader of the armed resistance against colonization and slavery, Louverture proved a seminal influence on the future of a free Haiti.  When Louverture wrote, “I may have been born a slave, but nature gave me the soul of a man,” he inspired generations of black slaves seeking independence from the chains of bondage.

This exhibition draws from the Boston Public Library’s important collection of Haitian and West Indies materials, which includes over 10,000 books and manuscripts.