Exhibitions

II. 17th Century – Maps of the World and America

Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612)
America
Amsterdam, [between 1609 to 1633]
Early 17th-century maps of the Americas also included Hy-Brasil, although the Island is most often depicted in Irish waters. In his map of America published circa 1609, Jodocus Hondius provides reference to the far western parts of the European continent by including the countries of Ireland, England and Portugal. Hondius also includes an illustration of a navigator from Greenland near the Island of Brasil and describes his sailing vessel and equipment, while pointing his trident towards a sea-bird off the coast of Scotland.
07d
 
 
John Speed (1552?-1629)
America with Those Known Parts in That Unknowne Worlde Both People and Manner of Buildings
London, 1626.
08d
 
 
John Speed (1552?-1629)
A New and Accurat Map of the World, Drawne According to ye Truest Descriptions Latest Discoveries & Best Observations yt Have Beene Made by English or Strangers, 1626
[London, 1627]
09d
 
 
Hendrik Hondius (1597-1651)
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula
Amsterdam, 1630.
10d
 
 
John Speed (1552?-1629)
America with Those Known Parts in that Unknowne Worlde both People and Manner of Buildings
London, 1631.
11d
 
 
Matthaeus Merian (1593-1650)
America Nouiter Delineata
[Frankfurt, Germany, 1634]
17th-century maps of the world, executed on the Mercator projection, also include the island of Hy-Brasil, such as this 1634 map by Swiss cartographer Matthaeus Merian. Here, Hy-Brasil is positioned in its original area near southwest Ireland. The same is true for Blaeu’s world map from 1638 included below.
12d
 
 
Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638)
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula
Amsterdam, 1638.
Courtesy Mapping Boston Foundation.
14d
 
 
Matthaeus Merian (1593-1650)
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula = Wahre Biltnüss des Gantzen Erden Kraÿses mit Allen Seinen Theilen
[Germany?, 1638]
13d
 
 
Matthaeus Merian (1593-1650)
America Noviter Delineata
[Germany?, 1640?]
15d
 
 
Hendrik Hondius (1597-1651)
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula
[Amsterdam, 1641]
Courtesy Mapping Boston Foundation.
16d
 
 
Robert Dudley (1574-1649)
“Carta Particolare dell Mare di Ierlandia é Parte di Inghilterr é della Iscotia,” from Dell’arcano del Mare
Florence, 1646-47.
Robert Dudley’s navigational atlas Dell’arcano del Mare was the first sea atlas to include charts from the entire known world. In his map of Ireland and the western coast of England, he includes Hy-Brasil, along with the following description: “I.O Brasil è Isola disabitata è incerta secietal’ Isola ò no.” In English, this phrase roughly translates to “Island [of] O Brasil. Island is uninhabited; is uncertain [friendly] island or not.” Here, Dudley states that Hy-Brasil is indeed in the North Atlantic Ocean, and is uninhabited, but is unsure of whether there is a “friendly society” living on the island. The shape of the island has changed yet again, and is represented here as a horseshoe, or an atoll [a ring-shaped coral reef]. Hy-Brasil executed in this shape was first depicted on a Catalan map of 1375.
16_2d
 
 
Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638)
Americae Nova Tabula
[Amsterdam, 1650]
17d
 
 
Jan Jansson (1588-1664)
Mar del Nort
Amsterdam, 1650.
18d
 
 
Nicholaes Visscher (1649-1702)
Americae Nova Descriptio
Amsterdam, 1652.
19d
 
 
Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638)
Americae Nova Tabula
Amsterdam, 1655.
20d
 
 
John Speed (1552?-1629)
A New and Accurat Map of the World Drawne According to ye Truest Descriptions Latest Discoveries & Best Observations yt Have Beene Made by English or Strangers
London, 1656.
21d
 
 
Philipp Eckebrecht (1594-1667)
Nova Orbis Terrarum Delineatio Singulari Ratione Accommodata Meridiano tabb. Rudolphi Astronomicarum
[Ulm, Germany, 1658?]
This 17th-century map by German merchant Philipp Eckebrecht includes a number of unique features. The world is portrayed by one full circle, or hemisphere, flanked by two half-circles, which is an unusual presentation. The prime meridian of the full circle runs through Uraniborg, Sweden, the site of astronomer Tycho Brahe’s observatory, while the double-headed eagle represents the Holy Roman Empire, which was in power at the time the map was produced. Eckebrecht’s map contains a number of references to contemporary figures and politics, however, he also indicated the presence of mythical “Brasil” to the west of Ireland.
22d
 
 
Nicholaes Visscher (1649-1702)
A New, Plaine, and Exact Map of America Described by N.I. Visscher, and don into English, Enlarged, and Corrected, according to I. Blaeu, with the Habits of the Countries, and the Manner of the Cheife Citties, the Like Never Before
London, 1658.
23d
 
 
Nicholaes Visscher (1649-1702)
A New, Plaine & Exact Map of Europe, Described by N.I. Visscher and Done into English, Enlarged & Corrected According to I. Blaeu, with the Habits of the People, and Manner of the Cheife Cities, 1658, the Like Never Before
London, 1658.
24d
 
 
Frederik de Wit (1629 or 1630-1706)
Nova Totivs Americae Descriptio
Amsterdam, 1660.
25d
 
 
John Speed (1552?-1629)
America : with Those Known Parts in that Unknowne Worlde both People and Manner of Buildings Discribed and Inlarged
London, 1662.
26d
 
 
John Speed (1552?-1629)
A New and Accurat Map of the World
London, 1662.
27d
 
 
Hugo Allardt (1625-1691)
Americae
Amsterdam, 1665.
28d
 
 
Hugo Allardt (1625-1691)
Americae
Amsterdam: Hendrick Doncker, 1665.
29d
 
 
Moses Pitt (fl. 1654-1696)
Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Geographica ac Hydrographica Tabula
Oxford, England, 1680.
30d
 
 
Nicholaes Visscher (1649-1702)
Novissima et Accuratissima Totius Americae Descriptio
Amsterdam, 1690.
31d
 
 
Carel Allard (1648-ca. 1709)
Americae Nova Discriptio
Amsterdam, [1690?]
32d
 
 
Vincenzo Coronelli (1650-1718)
Planisfero del Mondo Nuovo
Venice, 1691.
33d

PART I

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PART III