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March Lectures and Author Talks at Boston Public Library Locations

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Arthur series creator and experts on local history on the schedule

Boston Public Library will host lectures and author talks at the Central Library in Copley Square and branch locations through the month of March, highlighting the works of writers and experts in a variety of genres.marc

Local history enthusiasts can enjoy talks on the neighborhoods of Jamaica Plain, Mattapan, and Dorchester and also learn about the Charles River and the unique power of oral history in recapturing family stories.

One special highlight for families is the appearance of Marc Brown – the creator, author, and illustrator of the acclaimed Arthur series – on Sunday, March 9, at 2 p.m. Mr. Brown is speaking at the Central Library in Copley Square in conjunction with the library’s 2014 Lowell Lecture Series, which is dedicated to the theme “Gateway to Reading.”

March talks and lectures include:

  • Kim Harrison speaks about her newest novel The Undead Pool, the twelfth in the bestselling urban fantasy series The Hallows, on Wednesday, March 5, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Jamaica Plain resident Kathleen Hirsch describes her neighborhood using personal observations and interviews with community members in her recent book A Home in the Heart of a City. Thursday, March 6, at 6:15 p.m. at the Jamaica Plain Branch of the Boston Public Library, located at 12 Sedgwick Street. Part of the JP Writes & Invites Series.
  • Christopher Klein details the life of one of America’s first Irish-American sports heroes in Strong Boy: The Life and times of John L. Sullivan, America’s First Sports Hero on Thursday, March 6, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Lecture Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Marc Brown, the creator, author, and illustrator of the beloved Arthur series, appears at the Central Library as part of the Lowell Lecture Series on Sunday, March 9, at 2 p.m. in Rabb Lecture Hall in the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Rebecca Goldstein and the audience eavesdrop on Plato as he encounters the modern world in her talk highlighting her latest book Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away on Tuesday, March 11, at 6 p.m. in the Abbey Room at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • President and CEO of the Jewish Community Housing for the Elderly Amy Schectman discusses how outmigration from Mattapan and Dorchester is connected to Jewish migration patterns in and around Boston. Dr. Kerri Greenidge speaks about the evolution of Mattapan from mid-nineteenth century to today. Wednesday, March 12, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Lecture Series, www.bpl.org/localhistory.
  • Carolyn Wyman discusses chocolate chip cookies and their history in her book The Great American Chocolate Chip Cookie Book: Scrumptious Recipes & Fabled History from Toll House to Cookie Cake Pie on Saturday, March 15, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Ted Clarke discusses the 400-year history of Boston’s main river in The Charles River: A History of Greater Boston’s Waterway on Thursday, March 20, at 2 p.m. in Rabb Lecture Hall in the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Susanna Kaysen, bestselling author of Girl, Interrupted, speaks about her newest work Cambridge, which tells the story of a girl growing up in the 1950s among the academics and artists of Cambridge, Massachusetts. Thursday, March 20, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Thomas Mickey speaks about his book America’s Romance with English Gardens on Monday, March 24, at 6:30 p.m. at the Adams Street Branch of the Boston Public Library, located at 690 Adams Street in Dorchester.
  • Marian Pierre-Louis describes the role oral history plays in recapturing family stories and building stronger bonds, particularly within immigrant communities. Wednesday, March 26, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Lecture Series, www.bpl.org/localhistory.

The complete schedule of upcoming events at Boston Public Library locations is available at www.bpl.org/calendar.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first publicly supported municipal library in America, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit www.bpl.org.

 

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