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May Author Talks and Lectures at Boston Public Library Locations

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collageLowell Lecture and Local & Family History Lecture Series continue

Boston Public Library hosts May author talks at the Central Library in Copley Square and branch locations and continues its Lowell Lecture Series with appearances from children’s literature expert Maria Tatar, Rotten Ralph and Joey Pigza series author Jack Gantos, and a panel discussion of authors, scholars, and experts detailing children’s various paths to reading. The Local & Family History Lecture Series Boston’s Changing Neighborhoods: History and Genealogy concludes this month with lectures that focus on mining family research, tips for accessing local archives, and the migration of residents of Boston’s neighborhoods to the suburbs during the twentieth century.

Programming highlights in May include:

  • Maria Tatar speaks about the role of folklore and mythology in children’s literature on Thursday, May 1, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Lecture Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square. She is the author of Classic Fairy Tales, The Annotated Brothers Grimm, The Annotated Peter Pan, and Enchanted Hunters: The Power of Stories in Childhood and contributes frequently to the New Yorker and the New York Times. Part of the Lowell Lecture Series.
  • Rick Beinecke explores the recreational and natural resources of the Mystic River on Monday, May 5, at 6:30 p.m. at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street in Dorchester.
  • James O’Connell explains the migration of residents of Boston’s neighborhoods to surrounding suburbs during the twentieth century and examines the settling patterns of specific ethnic groups on Wednesday, May 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Lecture Series.
  • Boston Globe technology reporter Hiawatha Bray discusses his book You Are Here: From the Compass to GPS, the History and Future of How We Find Ourselves, which examines the rise of our technologically aided era of navigational omniscience – or how we came to know exactly where we are at all times. Thursday, May 8, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The Lowell Lecture Series “Different Paths to Reading” panel discussion takes place on Tuesday, May 13, at 6 p.m. in the Abbey Room at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. The panel features moderator Cathryn Mercier, Director of the Center for the Study of Children’s Literature and the Director of the Children’s Literature graduate degree programs at Simmons College; Alexandra Kennedy, the Executive Director of the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art; Sonia Nieto, Professor Emerita of Language, Literacy, and Culture for the College of Education at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; and Grace Lin, award-winning author and illustrator of picture books, early readers, and middle-grade novels.
  • Elizabeth F. Fideler speaks about her book Men Still at Work: Professionals Over Sixty and on the Job, which examines the important economic and social factors influencing the timing of retirement for older working men on Wednesday, May 14, at 6 p.m. in the Orientation Room at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The North End Branch, located at 25 Parmenter Street, hosts three author talks on Saturday, May 17, from 10:30 a.m. – 2:15 p.m., featuring authors Sunny Davidson, Carmela Cattuti, and journalist Nicola Orichuia. Their talks cover a range of topics, including personal reflections from travel expeditions, the tumultuous world of twentieth-century Sicily and New York, and the history and growth of Bostoniano Magazine.
  • South End author Wendy Wunder reads from her newest novel The Museum of Intangible Things, which tells the story of true friendship and first love, on Tuesday, May 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street.
  • Archivist Joanne Riley shares examples of “goldmines” for family research and provides tips for gaining access to various local archives on Wednesday, May 21, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Lecture Series. Following the talk, the speakers from the Local & Family History Lecture Series join together for a roundtable discussion on the evolution of Boston’s immigrant gateways and neighborhood development.
  • Acclaimed children’s author Jack Gantos visits the Central Library on Thursday, May 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Lecture Hall. Gantos is the author of more than 40 books for children, including the Rotten Ralph picture books and collections of Jack Henry short stories; upper elementary and middle school Joey Pigza novels; young adult novels Love Curse of the Rumbaughs and Desire Lines; and a memoir, Hole in My Life. Readers of all ages are invited to ask questions and meet Jack Gantos. Part of the Lowell Lecture Series.
  • Elizabeth Graver speaks about her latest novel The End of the Point, which examines the powerful legacy of family and place, on Thursday, May 29, at 6:30 p.m. at the Parker Hill Branch, located at 1497 Tremont Street in Roxbury.
  • BPL staff member John DeVito gives a slideshow lecture detailing how the legend of Jackie Kennedy lives on in popular culture in commemoration of the twentieth anniversary of her death. This lecture will be given on Thursday, May 15, at 2 p.m. in Rabb Lecture Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square and on Thursday, May 29, at 7 p.m. at the Brighton Branch, located at 40 Academy Hill Road.

The complete schedule of upcoming events at Boston Public Library locations is available at www.bpl.org/calendar.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit www.bpl.org.

 

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