Press Room

November Author Talks and Lectures

by rlavery

Boston Public Library’s November author talks and lectures include events across the system featuring topics such as crime, local art and history, immigration, and more:

  • In Shallow Graves: The Hunt for the New Bedford Highway Serial Killer, investigative reporter and award-winning journalist Maureen Boyle tells the story of a case that has haunted New England for forty years and shares excerpts from her work on Thursday, November 2, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Neil Swidey, a staff writer for Boston Globe Magazine, discusses the uncanny connections between the Trump administration’s anti-immigration rhetoric and the playbook crafted a century ago by a small group of Harvard-educated Boston Brahmin. Thursday, November 2, at 6:30 p.m. at the West End Branch, located at 151 Cambridge Street. This program is sponsored by the Boston Public Library’s Baxter Fund, which promotes programs that will further the commemorative and public understanding of the history of the settlement of and immigration to New England.
  • Paul Lewis, author of A is for Asteroids, Z is for Zombies: A Bedtime Book about the Coming Apocalypse discusses global threats in the spirit of taking these threats seriously while also finding relief from the anxiety they provoke on Saturday, November 4, at 3:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Local writer Larry Spotted Crow Mann gives a talk about current issues affecting the Native American community today and discusses his latest book, Drumming and Dreaming: A Collection of Nipmuc Legends on Thursday, November 9, at 6:30 p.m. at the Roslindale Branch, located at 4246 Washington Street.
  • Christine Verret spent five years traveling around greater Boston photographing over 420 murals and compiled them in a new book, Boston Murals. She discusses her adventures and shows slides of these colorful additions to the Boston cityscape on Monday, November 13, at 6 p.m. at the Connolly Branch, located at 433 Centre Street in Jamaica Plain.
  • Rosalyn Delores Elder’s book African American Heritage in Massachusetts—Exploring the Legacy: Places and Spaces of Significance tours 741 sites in towns across the Commonwealth that document the contributions of African Americans to our state’s history. Wednesday, November 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local and Family History Series.
  • Author and historian Anthony Sammarco reveals the fascinating history of Boston’s beloved Jordan Marsh department store on Thursday, November 16, at 6:30 p.m. at the Brighton Branch, located at 40 Academy Hill Road.
  • Boston Ballerina is both a memoir of Laura Young’s personal journey and a fascinating account of Boston Ballet’s rise from a regional troupe to the internationally recognized company that it is today. Thursday, November 16 at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Laura Erickson-Schroth, MD, and Laura Jacobs, LCSW-R, authors of You’re in the Wrong Bathroom! And 20 Other Myths and Misconceptions about Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming People discuss their work on Saturday, November 18, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Local author Stephanie Schorow speaks about her book The Cocoanut Grove Fire and commemorates its 75th anniversary this year on Tuesday, November 28, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local and Family History Series.
  • Sam Allis, Time Magazine‘s former Rome bureau chief, reads from his new historical novel A Hero of Two Worlds on Tuesday, November 28, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes Series.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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