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Boston Public Library’s October Author Talks & Lectures

Posted on September 25th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s October author talks and lectures feature a range of authors and topics, including public art, libraries and the digital age, health policy, Boston’s immigration history, southern food & civil rights, and more:

  • The South Boston Historical Society presents an author talk with Jim Lynch, who discusses the lives of three generations making a living on Boston’s waterfront in his novel The Longshoremen: Life on the Waterfront on Monday, October 2, at 6:30 p.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.
  • Margaret Newell, author and vice chair of the History Department at Ohio State University, explores the stories of Indians enslaved by English colonists in New England and shows how they influenced New England society in crucial ways, including by exposing their captors to Native religion, foods, and technology and fighting for citizenship in cases that had implications for all enslaved peoples in 18th-century America. Wednesday, October 4, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The Boston University Center for the Humanities forum “Recording Lives: Libraries and Archives in the Digital Age” features Robert Darnton, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor, Emeritus & University Librarian, Emeritus, Harvard University on Thursday, October 5, at 5:30 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Westy Egmont and Alvaro Lima unpack the stories behind the maps in the Leventhal Map Center’s exhibition, Who We Are: Boston Immigration Then and Now. Lima examines how transnationalism pushes the boundaries of traditional nation-state rules for citizenship, political rights, and migration, and Egmont discusses how diversity can foster a pluralistic world view and secure communities. After the talk, audience members will be invited to re-examine Who We Are. Thursday, October 5, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Dan Logan speaks about his first book The Dance Dragon, in which he overcomes his fear of dancing and puts forth the effort to learn on Thursday, October 5, at 6:30 p.m. at the West End Branch, located at 151 Cambridge Street.
  • Pediatrician Dr. Laura Gold reads from The Silenced Child, which describes the importance of listening in parent/child and doctor/patient relationships on Tuesday, October 10, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes series.
  • In The Health of Newcomers, Wendy E. Parmet and Patricia Illingworth draw on rigorous legal and ethical arguments and empirical studies, as well as personal stories of immigrant struggles, to make the compelling case that global phenomena such as poverty, the medical brain drain, organ tourism, and climate change ought to inform the health policy we craft for newcomers and natives alike. Thursday, October 12, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Kevin Devlin discusses The Southie Pact, which describes the damage that drugs do to ordinary people and to their community on Saturday, October 14,at  11 a.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.
  • Claire McMillan, author of The Necklace, and Denise Kiernan, author of The Last Castle: The Epic Story of Love, Loss, and American Royalty in the Nation’s Largest Home speak about their respective books on Saturday, October 14, at 12:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Nancy Schön, best-known for her iconic Make Way for Ducklings sculpture in Boston’s Public Garden, explores her major public projects and commissions, what inspired them, and what goes into making a beautiful and tactile work of public art in Make Way for Nancy on Thursday, October 19, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Schön will be interviewed by Anita Diamant, author of The Red Tent and The Boston Girl.
  • Frederick Douglass Opie, author of Southern Food and Civil Rights: Feeding the Revolution shares the ways southern food nourished the fight for freedom going back ages along with cherished recipes associated with the era. Monday, October 23, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Lisa Berenson, director of Educational Programming and Development at the Jewish Cemetery Association of Massachusetts, discusses an ambitious initiative to transform and restore a former Jewish mortuary chapel in East Boston into a state-of-the-art exhibit hall on the history of immigration in the Boston area. Wednesday, October 25, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Erica Ferencik details The River at Night, set against the harsh beauty of the Maine wilderness, which charts the journey of four friends as they fight to survive the aftermath of a white water rafting accident on Thursday, October 26, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with Booklist, Programs

Posted on September 18th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

latinolife2017Boston Public Library celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 – October 15) annually through publishing the Latino Life booklist, a list of recent books concerning the Hispanic experience. Genres include biography, expressions, history and contemporary issues, and fiction. Cheech Marin’s Cheech Is Not My Real Name, but Don’t Call Me Chong!, former Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez’s My First Life: Conversations with Ignacio Ramonet, and music mogul Tommy Mottola’s A New America: How Music Reshaped the Culture and Future of a Nation and Redefined My Life are among the nearly 60 titles. Themed programs and activities celebrating the month, including film series, crafts, and music, can be found through searching the BPL calendar.

“We encourage patrons and visitors to participate in our Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations through exploring recent titles in Boston Public Library’s annual curated booklist and attending a free festive event that honors Hispanic culture and tradition,” said Boston Public Library President David Leonard.

Each book on the list is briefly summarized by a committee of Boston Public library staff members. In addition to print books, select titles are available as an e-book, audiobook, or in Spanish as well as English. Copies of the booklist are available at all Boston Public Library locations across the city and online.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library’s Free Homework Help Begins September 18

Posted on September 14th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

September marks national Library Card Sign-up Month; educational resources and services await new cardholders

Boston Public Library’s free Homework Help program begins September 18 and runs through May 24, 2018, offering free afterschool help and mentorship provided by high-achieving high school students at most BPL locations across the city. The program, offered Monday through Thursday from 3:30 -5:30 p.m. is open to students in grades K-8; no registration required. Boston Teacher’s Union (BTU) tutors are also available during select weekdays from 4-6 p.m. for students in grades K-12. Visit www.bpl.org/homework for complete information. Most homework help mentors and program participants are Boston Public Schools students, though it is open to all, and BTU tutors are either current or retired Boston Public Schools teachers.

As September marks the return of the academic year and a month many new residents move to Boston, Boston Public Library reminds all during national Library Card Sign-up Month that anyone who lives, works, or goes to school in Massachusetts can have a Boston Public Library card.

“The startup of BPL’s Homework Help program marks back-to-school time at the library. We are here for Boston’s young people to support learning in a safe, welcoming environment, and again we are immensely grateful to Harvard University for their training of the high school mentors who run the program across the city,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. “September is also Library Card Sign-up Month and we welcome all new residents, students, and visitors with an invitation to check out the library in Copley Square and across the city’s neighborhoods. “ Read more »

Boston Public Library’s Local & Family History Lecture Series Fall Schedule

Posted on September 5th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s Local & Family History Lecture Series returns this month, offering information about the history of Boston and its diverse neighborhoods along with tips and guides for those beginning their own genealogical research. The complete September through December schedule can be viewed or downloaded online. The series offers a wide range of topics, from the Cocoanut Grove Fire to the history of Marshmallow Fluff’s production in Massachusetts:

  • Eve LaPlante discusses how Puritans viewed women’s power and women’s bodies, in this life and in the afterlife in “Monstrous Births, Powerful Midwives: The Battle Over Women’s Bodies in 17th-Century Boston” on Wednesday, September 13, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Steven Edson and Dan Gilman share their knowledge to help you preserve your family’s history before it’s lost or forgotten. Discover how to scan and restore old photographs, transfer paper to digital formats, convert old film to video, record interviews with relatives, and learn best practices for editing, storytelling, and sharing your family’s memories on Wednesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Margaret Newell, author and vice chair of the History Department at Ohio State University, explores the stories of Indians enslaved by English colonists in New England and shows how they influenced New England society in crucial ways, including by exposing their captors to Native religion, foods, and technology and fighting for citizenship in cases that had implications for all enslaved peoples in 18th-century America. Wednesday, October 4, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Lisa Berenson, director of Educational Programming and Development at the Jewish Cemetery Association of Massachusetts, discusses an ambitious initiative to transform and restore a former Jewish mortuary chapel in East Boston into a state-of-the-art exhibit hall on the history of immigration in the Boston area. Wednesday, October 25, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • David Allen Lambert, chief genealogist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, shows you how, despite challenges, you can start reconstructing your ancestor’s service history using draft registration cards and enlistments, the U.S. census, discharge papers, unit histories, and several other resources on Wednesday, November 8, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Rosalyn Delores Elder, author, registered architect, and cofounder of Jamaicaway Books, explores sites in towns across the commonwealth that document the contributions of African Americans to our state’s history on Wednesday, November 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Stephanie Schorow, author of six books including The Cocoanut Grove Fire and Drinking Boston: A History of the City and Its Spirits, explores the worst nightclub fire in U.S. history in its 75th anniversary year, in which 492 people perished on Tuesday, November 28, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Marshmallow Fluff was invented in Somerville and has been manufactured in Lynn since the 1950s. In celebration of Marshmallow Fluff’s centennial, Mimi Graney, author of Fluff: The Sticky Sweet Story of an American Icon, presents a fascinating narrative of Boston’s forgotten candy industry on Wednesday, December 6, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library’s September Author Talks and Lectures

Posted on August 30th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

fall talksSeptember begins Boston Public Library’s robust fall author talk series running through December, highlighted this month by Nancy Pearl, Robert McKee, bestselling romance authors, and the 2017 Druker Lecture by acclaimed fashion designer Joseph Abboud. The September-December Fall Author Talks & Lectures at the Central Library brochure can be viewed or downloaded online and will be available in early September at the Central Library in Copley Square.

Author talks and lectures at all Boston Public Library locations in September:

  • In her recently published guide, Une Québécoise à Boston, Marie-Josée Duquette draws on her experience, offering tips to readers about the culture, sports, and culinary delights Boston provides. Thursday, September 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • In honor of Grandparents Day, award-winning author and storyteller Irene Smalls shares her stories on Saturday, September 9, at 2 p.m. at the Dudley Branch, located at 65 Warren Street in Roxbury.
  • NPR books commentator and librarian Nancy Pearl discusses her debut novel about an unlikely marriage at a crossroads – George and Lizzie is an intimate story of new and past loves, the scars of childhood, and an imperfect marriage at its defining moment. Tuesday, September 12, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • South End poet and historian Lynne Potts reads from her new book Faces of a Neighborhood: Boston’s South End in the Early 21st Century on Tuesday, September 12, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes series.
  • A romance panel titled “Beyond Mr. Darcy: New Markets in Romance” features bestselling authors and romance genre experts Damon Suede, Farrah Rochon, and Sarina Bowen on Thursday, September 14, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Local author Janet Britcher presents an overview of her book Zoom Leadership: Change Your Focus Change Your Insights, which offers techniques to draw on the reader’s personal experience and expertise to aide in decision making. Monday, September 18, at 6:30 p.m. at the Hyde Park Branch, located at 35 Harvard Avenue.
  • Conservator Mimi Leveque gives an overview of her work with case studies on individual mummies in relation to her development of an ethical approach to the treatment of human remains, in particular those of ancient Egyptians in her talk “My Life Among the Dead: Developing an Ethical Approach to Mummy Conservation.” Tuesday, September 19, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Robert McKee, Fulbright Scholar and bestselling author, shares “The Primacy of Story” on Wednesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. McKee’s signature STORY Seminars are held around the globe, with alumni including over 65 Academy Award winners, 250 Emmy Award winners, and 50 Directors Guild of America Award winners.
  • Journalist Lenora Chu offers a rare glimpse inside China’s insular education system, discussing Little Soldiers: An American Boy, a Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve on Saturday, September 23, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Boston Public Library’s 2017 Druker Lecture features fashion designer and author Joseph Abboud, celebrating urban design and architecture on Wednesday, September 27, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Andrew Budson details his book Seven Steps to Managing Your Memory: What’s Normal, What’s Not, and What to Do About It on Thursday, September 28, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Cornel West discusses and signs copies of the 35th anniversary edition of his book, Prophesy of Deliverance, providing readers a new understanding of the African American experience based largely on his own political and cultural perspectives. A discussion will then be moderated by Dr. Saida Grundy of Boston University on Thursday, September 28, at 6 p.m. at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester.

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