Press Room http://www.bpl.org/press Wed, 21 Sep 2016 19:32:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Stacy Schiff Explores “The Witches: Salem, 1692” at the Central Library http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/21/stacy-schiff-explores-the-witches-salem-1692-at-the-central-library/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/21/stacy-schiff-explores-the-witches-salem-1692-at-the-central-library/#comments Wed, 21 Sep 2016 19:24:52 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6580 lowresAuthor Stacy Schiff visited the Boston Public Library’s Central Library in Copley Square on Tuesday, September 21, to discuss her latest book, The Witches: Salem, 1692, with help from moderator Brenton Simons, President and CEO of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. The nonfiction book examines the social, political, and legal landscape of the Salem witch hysteria, an ordeal that began in late winter 1692 and ended nine months later.

Schiff, who joked that she came to Boston from New York City via broom, explained that a variety of political and historical factors—including the recent King Philip’s War and the coup of Massachusetts governor Edmund Andros—contributed to an environment of fear and paranoia in 1692 Salem. It was in this unstable landscape that the first witchcraft accusations emerged after two pre-adolescent girls in the home of town minister Samuel Parris began to act strangely. Soon, other teenage girls throughout the town began to shriek and writhe, and accusations of witchcraft were leveled against everyone from a beggar woman to one of the wealthiest merchants in Salem.

Schiff explained that unlike the modern-day conception of a witch with a pointy hat and broomstick, a 17th-century witch was a religious figure, a colleague of the devil viewed as a very real threat. Witches, she said, were a way to explain everything from a misplaced item to the death of a family member—they helped explain the unexplainable. She added that accusing someone of witchcraft was also a convenient way to retaliate against an enemy.

A 17th-century court room, Schiff said, was already a rowdy place; the shrieking girls who filled Salem’s courtroom as evidence of witchcraft only added to the chaos and confusion. The accused soon learned that they could save their lives by confessing and in turn pointing a finger at a neighbor. By August of 1692, everyone on trial was confessing to witchcraft. When the hysteria ended, Schiff noted, a veil of silence fell over the trials and records were destroyed. As recently as the 1950s, when Arthur Miller visited Salem for research for The Crucible, residents were reluctant to discuss the trials.

In response to Simons’ question about possible causes for the hysteria, Schiff dismissed the old theory of poisoning by ergot—a fungus found in rye that causes hallucinations—as not possible for a variety of reasons; instead, she believes trauma resulting from King Philip’s War was a contributing factor. The brutal conflict between the colonists and Native Americans had ended about fifteen years before the trials, and everyone in Salem knew someone who had died or was a captive.

Before concluding with a question and answer session, Simons pointed out that, thanks to an invitation from the New England Historic Genealogical society, a number of the night’s audience members were descendants of the accused.

Boston Public Library holds original records from the Salem Witch Trials, including manuscript depositions, as part of our Colonial and Revolutionary Boston Collection of Distinction.

The next Author Talk features Larry Tye, author of Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon, on Thursday, September 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall.

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Karin Tanabe Discusses “The Gilded Years” at BPL http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/16/karin-tanabe-discusses-the-gilded-years-at-bpl/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/16/karin-tanabe-discusses-the-gilded-years-at-bpl/#comments Fri, 16 Sep 2016 20:24:11 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6539 img_1869The Gilded Years author Karin Tanabe visited the Central Library on Thursday, September 15 to discuss her historical fiction work, which tells the story of Anita Hemmings, the first black woman to attend and graduate Vassar College by passing as a white woman in the late 1890s. Anita has local ties – she grew up in Roxbury and worked at the Boston Public Library as a cataloguer, and likely met her husband at the BPL. Tanabe is a Vassar alumna and first got the idea for the book in 2014, when she flipped through her alumni magazine and saw mention of Anita. She began researching the woman and quickly found that not too much information could be found, but the subject of her next book was quickly brewing in her head.

Tanabe and some of her friends visited Vassar to search through their archives to find correspondence and details about Anita Hemmings. She was active in school, a member of the debate club and choir, and a very intelligent woman. Though no “majors” existed at Vassar at the time, Anita focused on languages and wanted to be a teacher. The year after she graduated, her college roommate of two years leaked the news that she was an African-American woman after her suspicions were raised in their senior year. After college, Anita married and lived with her husband in Tennessee before relocated to New York City. Anita did not pursue a teaching career after marrying and having children.

A question and answer period followed the reading of a passage. Audience members were curious to know if Anita was related to Peter or Sally Hemmings (maybe), and if Tanabe had communicated with any of Anita’s ancestors; Tanabe has been in touch with Anita’s great granddaughter. Listeners also asked if Anita was involved in civil rights issues, and Tanabe said she was not, to her knowledge, but Anita had a best friend who went to Wellesley College who was. One of the most challenging aspects of writing this book, Tanabe said, was tracking down the name of Anita’s roommate; she wrote most of the book without knowing. Tanabe also discussed how the book has relevance today, as racial tensions and acceptance of others is still an issue more than 100 years later.

Tanabe concluded the talk by signing books and showing photographs of Anita and others related to The Gilded Years.

The next Author Talk is Tuesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, featuring Stacy Schiff, author of The Witches: Salem, 1692.

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Boston Public Library Loans Centuries-Old Illuminated Manuscripts for Collaborative Beyond Words Exhibition http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/16/boston-public-library-loans-centuries-old-illuminated-manuscripts-for-collaborative-beyond-words-exhibition/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/16/boston-public-library-loans-centuries-old-illuminated-manuscripts-for-collaborative-beyond-words-exhibition/#comments Fri, 16 Sep 2016 18:51:25 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6536 januarius_0212Exhibitions opening this month at Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the McMullen Museum at Boston College, and Houghton Library at Harvard University

Boston Public Library is loaning 36 medieval and early Renaissance manuscripts and printed books from its collections to three area cultural institutions, part of an ambitious collaborative project entitled Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts in Boston Collections. The largest ever exhibition of medieval and Renaissance books held in North America, the BPL items date from the 10th century to the early 16th century, part of the Library’s Medieval and Early Renaissance Manuscripts Collection of Distinction. The materials will be featured at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the McMullen Museum at Boston College, and Houghton Library at Harvard University from September 2016 to January 2017. For more information about the exhibitions, visit www.beyondwords2016.org.

“These illuminated manuscripts and bound books represent a crucial period in the Western evolution of writing and reading,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. “This first of its kind collaborative exhibition is an exciting opportunity for the Boston Public Library to put our collection on display, and make these objects viewable and easily accessible to the public.”

“The Boston Public Library’s early manuscripts collection is astounding in its breadth and overall quality. Scholars come to Boston from around the world in order to study these artifacts,” said Jay Moschella, Curator of Rare Books at the Boston Public Library and one of the facilitators of the exhibition for the library.

In preparation for the exhibition all of the BPL’s 36 items have been appraised, cataloged, and in some cases conserved and/or digitized. This work has been made possible with funding support from The Associates of the Boston Public Library, an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving the Boston Public Library’s special collections of rare books, manuscripts, prints, and other items of historic interest.

“The Associates of the Boston Public Library is honored to have helped make this extraordinary exhibition a reality,” said Vivian Spiro, Board Chairman of the Associates of the Boston Public Library. “The collaboration among area institutions, as well as the manuscripts themselves, show that Boston is still a major cultural center, relative to the rest of the country. “

These unique and ancient manuscripts are some of the best sources for understanding the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Revealing many elements of the artistic, intellectual, and spiritual life of the period, they date from the 10th through early 16th centuries and cover a wide range of subjects. They also represent a wide variety of schools of both script and illumination in France, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany, and England.

Many of the exhibited items from the BPL’s collection are superbly illuminated with exquisite miniatures. Some noteworthy volumes include a 10th-century lectionary from the Benedictine Abbey of St. Allyre in Clermont, one of the earliest codices in New England; the so-called Rosary Joan the Mad, an extraordinarily beautiful Psalter prepared for Joan, Queen of Castile by the master Flemish miniaturist Simon Bening; the Chronique Anonyme Universelle, a 34′ 15th-century genealogical scroll detailing the history of the world from creation through the 1440s; an early 15th-century copy of Christine de Pisan’s Le Livre de Trois Vertus, considered by scholars to be among the earliest and truest versions of her text; and the only surviving Dutch illuminated manuscript of Saint Augustine’s City of God, written in the late 15th century.

The very nature of these texts renders them unique and rare. Executed in European monasteries or later in scriptoria, these manuscripts document the history of human thought from the 10th through early 16th centuries.

Totaling 260 objects, Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts in Boston Collections features materials from 19 Boston-area institutions, including the BPL, Museum of Fine Arts, and Wellesley College, among many others. The manuscripts assembled are included in a single catalog with contributions from 85 international scholars, edited by co-curators Jeffrey Hamburger, William P. Stoneman, Anne-Marie Eze, Lisa Fagin Davis and Nancy Netzer and published by the McMullen Museum.

Image Credit: Psalter in Latin, c.a. 1250. Courtesy of the Boston Public Library Rare Books Department

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Hispanic Heritage Month Celebrated at Boston Public Library with Booklist, Programs http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/16/hispanic-heritage-month-celebrated-at-boston-public-library-with-booklist-programs/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/16/hispanic-heritage-month-celebrated-at-boston-public-library-with-booklist-programs/#comments Fri, 16 Sep 2016 14:40:27 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6531 latinolife2016Boston Public Library honors Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 – October 15) annually through publishing the Latino Life booklist, a list of recent books concerning the Hispanic experience. A wide range of genres are included, such as biography, historical and contemporary issues, and fiction. Sandra Cisneros’ A House of My Own: Stories from My Life, In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero, former Glee star Naya Rivera’s Sorry Not Sorry: Dreams, Mistakes, and Growing Up, and What We Become by Arturo Pérez-Reverte are just a sampling of the list of over seventy titles.

“I am thankful to the members of the committee who curated this excellent book list and am confident the variety of recommendations for Hispanic Heritage month will be enjoyed by readers; I encourage library users to share feedback on the titles and their favorite authors,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

Each book on the list is briefly summarized. This work was performed by a committee of Boston Public library staff members. Copies of the booklist will be available next week at all Boston Public Library locations across the city, and themed programs and activities celebrating the month can be found through searching the BPL calendar.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Discussion: Public Art and Irish Influence on Art in Boston http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/15/discussion-public-art-and-irish-influence-on-art-in-boston/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/15/discussion-public-art-and-irish-influence-on-art-in-boston/#comments Thu, 15 Sep 2016 17:16:17 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6526 Featuring artists Caoimhghin Ó Fraithile and Michael Dowling at the Central Library in Copley Square

On Sunday, September 18, at 2 p.m. Boston Public Library President David Leonard will welcome Caoimhghin Ó Fraithile (Ireland) and Michael Dowling (Boston-US/Ireland) to the Central Library in Copley Square for a discussion about public art, the Irish influence on art in Boston, and their work which is featured in the temporary public art project, Tír na nÓg, now on view in the Back Bay Fens.

“Over the past year, we’ve seen incredible energy around public art installations in Boston,” said Julie Burros, Chief of Arts and Culture for the City of Boston. “Projects like Tír na nÓg promote public discourse, bringing people together in conversation and helping us reach the goals of the Boston Creates Cultural Plan. We are thrilled to see it in the Fens and look forward to hearing from the artists.”

“The Boston Public Library is a supporter of arts and culture in the City of Boston and we’re thrilled to lead this conversation exploring themes of creativity, healing, public art, space, and inspiration with these two internationally acclaimed artists who are enlivening one of Boston’s beloved parks this summer and fall,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

Caoimhghin Ó Fraithile is a visual artist who creates drawings and large-scale temporary and permanent site-specific works that reflect the transient nature of the world, humanity, and our place within nature. His work is also featured as part of Hy-Brasil: Mapping a Mythical Island, an exhibition currently on display in the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library. For twenty five years, Michael Dowling has been harnessing his art and his artistic vision to create needed places for people to gather and to heal. He has served as the Artist in Residence at multiple organizations, most recently at Brandeis University.

Medicine Wheel Productions, a community-based arts organization in South Boston, is the lead organization for the Tír na nÓg  project and is working in collaboration with the Fenway Alliance, a non-profit membership service and advocacy organization dedicated to the prosperity and growth of the Fenway Cultural District. The two artists were commissioned by Medicine Wheel Productions under the curatorial support of MWP Chief Curator Kathleen Bitetti to create two site-specific artworks in the Back Bay Fens section of Boston’s Emerald Necklace Park System designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. Ó Fraithile’s floating piece, “South of Hy-Brasil,” and Michael Dowling’s piece, “Well House,” can both be viewed from the banks of the MFA Lagoon in the Back Bay Fens.

Tír na nÓg is part of Culture Ireland’s 2016 Centennial – a global initiative to mark the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising which set Ireland on it path for independence.

 

WHERE: Rabb Hall, Central Library in Copley Square, 700 Boylston Street, Boston

WHEN: Sunday, September 18, at 2 p.m.

WHO:

  • Boston Public Library President David Leonard
  • Caoimhghin Ó Fraithile
  • Michael Dowling
  • Stephanie Cyr, Assistant Curator of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library

 

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Michael Patrick MacDonald Kicks Off Fall Author Talk Series http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/14/michael-patrick-macdonald-kicks-off-fall-author-talk-series/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/09/14/michael-patrick-macdonald-kicks-off-fall-author-talk-series/#comments Wed, 14 Sep 2016 18:39:30 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6515 mpm_1Michael Patrick MacDonald, the author of All Souls and Easter Rising, spoke to a captivated audience that filled the newly renovated Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square last night. MacDonald spent the hour reading from his debut novel All Souls and exploring his emotional journey and experience in South Boston during the 1980s and 1990s. A slideshow of his family and the South Boston Old Colony Housing Project where he grew up played in the background, giving a quiet but powerful context to the memories MacDonald related.

The first reading included an ode to the time MacDonald spent at the Boston Public Library during his high school years. He described the library as his shelter and safe haven. He spent so much time at the library, he added, that he eventually got a job shelving books—an anecdote that garnered applause from the audience. Fond memories of the library segued into his relationship with the world of punk rock. MacDonald’s story of stalking the band Sex Pistols, who were staying at the Central Library’s neighbor the Lenox Hotel, illustrated his sense of living in two worlds: South Boston and the punk rock scene, which allowed him to escape the harsh realities of Southie life.

MacDonald also explored the tragedies that took the lives of four of his eleven siblings and informed the writing of All Souls. His grief over these losses manifested as physical ailments. After going to see doctors all over the city, MacDonald finally was recommended to a therapist, an experience that made him realize that what happened to his family and his circumstances in Southie were not “normal.” Even more importantly, it helped MacDonald acknowledge the tragic events in his life.

The night concluded with numerous questions from the audience. MacDonald talked about his community organizing and the importance of that work as a way for him to transform his pain into good. MacDonald’s new book, with the working title The Echoes, focuses on the heroin epidemic in South Boston and Charlestown in the 90s and is slated for release in 2017.

This talk is part of the Boston Public Library’s Lowell Lecture Series and is generously sponsored by the Lowell Institute, established in 1836 with the specific mission of making great ideas accessible to all people, free of charge.

The next  Author Talk is on Thursday, September 15, at 6 p.m. featuring Karin Tanabe, author of Gilded Years, and takes place in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square.

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Boston Public Library’s Read Your Way to Fenway Summer Essay Contest Winners Recognized at August 28 Red Sox Game http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/08/29/boston-public-librarys-read-your-way-to-fenway-summer-essay-contest-winners-recognized-at-august-28-red-sox-game/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/08/29/boston-public-librarys-read-your-way-to-fenway-summer-essay-contest-winners-recognized-at-august-28-red-sox-game/#comments Mon, 29 Aug 2016 18:17:13 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6511 IMG_0612 (2)Boston Public Library’s Read Your Way to Fenway summer essay contest winners enjoyed the magic of Fenway Park on Sunday, August 28 when the Red Sox took on the Kansas City Royals – celebrating the game and their reading accomplishments this summer.

Youth ages 5-17 were encouraged to read a minimum of three books and write an essay about their favorite for the chance to attend the game; 679 kids participated in the program and 473 winners were chosen. The on-field winners, who were part of a pre-game ceremony Sunday night, include Fatuma Mahdi Ahmed – Dudley Branch, Angelina Coral Hernandez – Charlestown Branch, Aayush Patel – Central Library, Zachary Riviello – Parker Hill Branch, Malik Cross – Grove Hall Branch, and Gabriel Custodio from the Uphams Corner Branch.

“I’m extremely proud of our young Bostonians for spending the summer reading and participating in Boston Public Library’s programs. Through their participation in library programs, they are well prepared to start the school year – and there is no better way to end the summer than by spending a night at Fenway Park with the Red Sox,” said Mayor Martin J. Walsh.

“We received hundreds of insightful essays from young people all across Boston and are thrilled to reward their accomplishments with this fun summer activity,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. “The support of the community and of our critical sponsors allows the Boston Public Library to offer programs supporting the reading and literacy skills our youth need to succeed in school and life.”

In addition to the Read Your Way to Fenway summer essay contest, youth and adults participated in summer reading programs throughout the Boston Public Library system from June through August, engaging in a variety of enriching skill-building programs.

Read Your Way to Fenway is sponsored by John Hancock, The Red Sox Foundation, and The Boston Public Library Foundation.

Pictured above (left to right): Boston Public Library President David Leonard, Boston Public Library Manager of Youth Services Farouqua Abuzeit, Executive Director of the Red Sox Foundation Gena Borson, winners Angelina Coral Hernandez, Aayush Patel, Zachary Riviello, Malik Cross, and Gabriel Custodio. Additional photos are available upon request.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY FOUNDATION

The Boston Public Library Foundation is a fundraising arm of the BPL, with a mission to raise private funds for library programs and special projects.  Working closely with the leadership team of the Library, as well as the Board of Trustees, the Foundation has made over 15 grants to the BPL in Fiscal Year 2016, ranging in size from $10,000 to $175,000, to support programs such as the Lowell Lecture Series, Concerts in the Courtyard, Read Your Way to Fenway, Community Learning Center programs, and the upcoming “Celebrating Shakespeare” initiative, among others.

 

 

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Boston Public Library September Literary Events and Programs http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/08/25/boston-public-library-september-literary-events-and-programs/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/08/25/boston-public-library-september-literary-events-and-programs/#comments Thu, 25 Aug 2016 16:22:13 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6508 collageBoston Public Library offers an abundance of author talks and programs across the city’s locations in September, including classes designed to build career skills by the Central Library’s newly renovated Kirstein Business Library and Innovation Center. Visit www.bpl.org/calendar for a complete list.

  • The library’s first Lowell Lecture of 2016 features Michael Patrick MacDonald, who details his memoir All Souls: A Family Story from Southie on Tuesday, September 13, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Lori Stokes debunks five myths about the Puritans on Wednesday, September 14, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Karin Tanabe speaks about her book The Gilded Years, which tells the story of Anita Hemmings, the first black woman to attend Vassar College by passing as a white woman, on Thursday, September 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Kim Kerrigan and Steven R. Wells discuss Get a Grip on Business Writing: Critical Skills for Success in Today’s Workplace and give tips for attendees on Thursday, September 15, at 6:30 p.m. at the West End Branch, located at 151 Cambridge Street.
  • The Friends of the Connolly Branch Library hold their annual book sale on Saturday, September 17, from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. at 433 Centre Street in Jamaica Plain.
  • Stacy Schiff, author of The Witches: Salem, 1692 examines the legal and social ramifications of the Salem Witch Trials, the truth about witchcraft, the adolescent mind, and how the events of 1692 shaped America’s future. Tuesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • In Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon, Larry Tye draws upon unpublished memoirs, unreleased government files, and 58 boxes of Bobby’s papers that had been under lock and key for the past forty years to peel away layers of myth and misconception to paint a complete portrait of him on Thursday, September 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Ted Reinstein, a native New Englander and local writer, shares stories from the history of New England and brings to life many of the fights, spats, and arguments that have, in many ways, shaped the region in Wicked Pissed: New England’s Most Famous Feuds. Tuesday, September 27, at 6 p.m. in the Abbey Room at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Stephen T. Moskey explores the intersection of wealth, celebrity, politics, gender, and race in Larz and Isabel Anderson: Wealth and Celebrity in the Gilded Age on Wednesday, September 28, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.

Kirstein Business Library & Innovation Center (KBLIC) September classes:

  • Gary Gekow: Interview Workshop: Participants role-play typical interview questions and learn how best to answer them in this interactive and informal question and answer session on Tuesday, September 6, at 6 p.m. in The Exchange, located on the Lower Level of the Central Library’s Johnson building at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Web Development Academy Orientation: Ryan Mitchell, author of Web Scraping with Python: Collecting Data from the Modern Web and Instant Web Scraping with Java teaches basic web design from September 12 – November 7 in The Exchange at the Kirstein Business Library & Innovation Center. Classes will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6-8 p.m. (excluding Columbus Day). An orientation session will be held on Wednesday, September 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street. Attendance at the orientation is required to register for the course.
  • Summer School Series 2: Digital Marketing Strategies: Hosted by General Assembly, this class covers the fundamentals of digital marketing and introduces attendees to the key channels, concepts, and metrics on Thursday, September 8, at 6:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Basics of 3D Printing: Students receive an overview of software and equipment available for 3D printing at KBLIC on Thursday, September 8, at 1 or 6 p.m., and on Thursday, September 29, at 1 or 6 p.m. in The Exchange, located on the Lower Level of the Central Library’s Johnson building at 700 Boylston Street.
  • SCORE Small Business Mentoring: Receive free one-hour business mentoring sessions for small business owners or people considering starting a small business on Saturday, September 10, at 1, 2, or 3 p.m. and Saturday, September 24, at 1, 2, or 3 p.m. in The Exchange, located on the Lower Level of the Central Library’s Johnson building at 700 Boylston Street. Preregistration is required; please call 617.565.5591 or visit https://scoreboston.org/KL.
  • Gary Gekow: Interview Workshop Part Two – Behavioral Interviewing: Find out how to answer scenario-based questions with a story-like response using the STAR style of interviewing on Tuesday, September 13, at 6 p.m. in The Exchange, located on the Lower Level of the Central Library’s Johnson building at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Navigating Photoshop: Learn basic techniques to navigate Photoshop, manipulate images, get an introduction to layers, and discover resources for further learning on Thursday, September 15, at 1 or 6 p.m. in The Exchange, located on the Lower Level of the Central Library’s Johnson building at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Gary Gekow: The Importance of LinkedIn: Gekow reviews best practices as they relate to online profile creation and managing one’s account. He also discusses the many additional usages of LinkedIn including the importance of joining groups and getting others to offer testimonials. Tuesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in The Exchange, located on the Lower Level of the Central Library’s Johnson building at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Create with Photoshop: Receive an overview of specialized tools and brushes for creating and editing images on Thursday, September 22, at 1 or 6 p.m. in The Exchange, located on the Lower Level of the Central Library’s Johnson building at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Budgeting Basics with Google Sheets: Learn how to create an inventory of your monthly expenses using Google Sheets. This workshop will help you keep your budget on track so you can save for future goals on Friday, September 23, at 2:30 p.m. in the Community Learning Center Classroom in the Johnson building on the Mezzanine Level at the Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Gary Gekow: Tell Me about Yourself: In this interactive workshop, learn new-found confidence in how to talk about yourself in interviews, including where to begin and when to end to make a compelling story on Tuesday, September 27, at 6 p.m. in The Exchange, located on the Lower Level of the Central Library’s Johnson building at 700 Boylston Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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A New Entrance: the Boylston & Exeter Streetscapes of the Central Library Renovation http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/08/03/a-new-entrance-the-boylston-exeter-streetscapes-of-the-central-library-renovation/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/08/03/a-new-entrance-the-boylston-exeter-streetscapes-of-the-central-library-renovation/#comments Wed, 03 Aug 2016 21:14:29 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6496 LandscapeThe Central Library Renovation starts at the curb. Guided by a philosophy of welcome, warmth, and engagement, once you set foot on the block your experience of the Boston Public Library begins.

At the Boylston Street entrance of the Central Library there is new space for community gathering that extends the library experience beyond its doors. Once intended for pedestrian movement alone and separated from the building by a series of granite screens or plinths, the sidewalk is now an inviting space that visitors can enjoy, thanks to a redesign by landscape architecture firm Reed Hilderbrand, working under the guidance of Willam Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc. A subtle row of eight Honey Locusts shade the sidewalk on the Boylston Street side, and Autumn Blaze Maples stand on Exeter Street, bringing a welcoming, colorful, and natural presence to the streetscape.

Visitors will now be able to take a seat, perch, or hold informal group meetings inside and outside the library, at an exterior group of benches or at the communal “Civic Table” with its differing heights for children and adults, providing a welcoming area for gathering and hanging out.

After dark, a system of catenary lights interspersing the tree line illuminates this “outdoor room” on Boylston Street. In addition to creating a community space, the Civic Table brings elements of the Library outside, inspired by the large tables inside the Central Library and wired to support digital access. The landscape also helps visually extend the Library onto the street, as the pavers form a pattern that mirrors those inside the new building entrance.

While this new streetscape meets the current needs of today’s Boston, it also preserves the history of the Johnson building by repurposing its materials. The granite plinths that once guarded the windows of the building and enclosed small inaccessible gardens have been reimagined as sidewalk pavers. In a nod to their past, one edge of the plinth pavers aligns with the outside edge of the former gardens. The square pavers that once marked the entrance to the Johnson building on Boylston Street have been re-laid in their original pattern, continuing a type of granite carpet from curb to interior.

Thanks to this new welcoming and warm landscape, the Central Library is now more intimately connected to the streetscape and the city of Boston.

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Color Boston Public Library’s Collections for National Coloring Book Day http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/08/02/color-boston-public-librarys-collections-for-national-coloring-book-day/ http://www.bpl.org/press/2016/08/02/color-boston-public-librarys-collections-for-national-coloring-book-day/#comments Tue, 02 Aug 2016 21:06:35 +0000 http://www.bpl.org/press/?p=6470 August 2 is National Coloring Book Day, and in celebration, we bring you four prints from our collections for you to color. To get started, click on the picture below to download a PDF of each image in coloring format. Then, print the image and color away!

Elephant

19th-Century American Trade Card for Lothrops, Farnham & Co. See the original here.

McKim Buildling

Boston Public Library Postcard from the Tichnor Brothers Collection. See the original here.

Philosophy Panel

Philosophy Mural Panel by Pierre Puvis de Chavannes at the Central Library in Copley Square.
See the original here.

ships

Set design drawing by Antonio Aquaroni. See the original here.

 

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