Press Room

Mayor’s Office of Arts and Culture Partners with Berklee College of Music to Host Boston Day of Reflection at the Boston Public Library

Posted on January 31st, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases
Tags: ,

On Saturday, February 4, 2017 the Mayor’s Office of Arts and Culture will join with the Berklee College of Music to present the Boston Day of Reflection: Creating a More Caring and Just Community in Rabb Hall at the Boston Public Library’s Central Library in Copley Square. This free, all-day event includes an expert panel on campus inclusiveness, a presentation and Q&A by Lesléa Newman, and a performance by noted singer/songwriter Melissa Ferrick.

Boston Day of Reflection: Creating a More Caring and Just Community will begin at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, February 4, 2017 at the Central Library. Refreshments will be served from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Julie Burros, Chief of Arts and Culture for the City of Boston, will offer welcoming remarks at 10:00 a.m.

The first panel, How to Create a More Inclusive College Community, will be presented by the Boston ProArts Consortium. Panelists include Brenda Bailey, Assistant Director of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at Massachusetts College of Art; Neil Donohoe, Dean of Theater, Boston Conservatory; Tamia Jordan, Director, Intercultural Student Affairs, Emerson College; Rene Pfister, Voice Faculty, Berklee; Daniel Soghomonian, Phonathon Manager, Berklee; and will be moderated by Kevin Johnson, Director, Office for Diversity and Inclusion, Berklee. The panel will take place from 10:15 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Lesléa Newman will present He Continues to Make a Difference: The Story of Matthew Shepard from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Newman is the author of 70 books for readers of all ages. She is the author of Heather Has Two Mommies, the first children’s book to portray lesbian families in a positive way. Newman is also the author of many books for adults that deal with lesbian identity, Jewish identity, and the intersection and collision between the two. Read more »

Boston Public Library’s 2017 Literacy Services Offerings

Posted on January 24th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases
Tags: , ,

Boston Public Library begins 2017 with a full slate of literacy resources and opportunities for learners throughout Boston and the Commonwealth, including ESL classes and conversation groups, HiSet preparation classes, online tools, and immigrant information material. Visit www.bpl.org/research/literacy.htm for a complete list of offerings and services.

 

  • ESL Classes: ESL instruction is offered in a traditional classroom environment. Classes range from beginner – for people with little or no experience with English – to high-intermediate. Classes are free; however, registration is required. For more information and to register please call 617.859.2446 or email mmurray@bpl.org. Please visit bpl.org/branches/ESL_groups.pdf for the complete schedule.
  • ESL Conversation Groups: Practice speaking English in an informal and friendly group setting with other adult ESL students and new English speakers. Groups are led by a native English speaker. Please visit bpl.org/branches/ESL_groups.pdf for the complete schedule.
  • HiSet Preparation Classes: The HiSet test (High School Equivalency Test) is the new replacement to the GED test. Classes are offered on Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. through March 22 at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 12 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. through March 23 at the Fields Corner Branch, located at 1520 Dorchester Avenue.
  • Immigrant Information Corners: Immigrant Information Corners, located at all 24 Boston Public Library locations, are a strategic collaboration between the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), Boston Public Library, and the City of Boston, as well as community partners.  They are meant to serve as information stations for Boston’s immigrants and refugees, giving access to citizenship and other immigration-related materials in multiple languages, information about citizenship preparation assistance, as well as information about financial empowerment resources.
  • Learn Online & Literacy Resources:
  • LearningExpress Library—Log on and practice for SAT, GED, HiSet, TOEFL, and other education tests. Learn-A-Test is interactive and is based on official tests that will help you improve your scores on academic, civil service, military, and professional licensing and certification exams. It provides immediate scoring, complete answer explanations, and individualized analysis of your score. All you need is your BPL card or eCard number.
  • Mango Languages—Mango Languages is a great online language learning program for both English and foreign languages.  For the English learning component, users can select their native language as the language through which they learn English.
  • Literacy Resources:

Research Guide: Literacy Resources for Adult ESL and ABE Educators

Research Guide: Literacy Resources for ABE and ESL Learners

  • Small Group Tutoring: Both English as a Second Language (ESL) and Adult Basic Education (ABE) skills instruction are offered.  ESL groups are composed of 2-4 participants and one native-English speaking tutor.  Participants have the chance to work on improving their conversational skills, as well as reading and writing.  ABE groups traditionally have less students and focus on improving basic reading and writing skills toward individual student goals.  For more information and to register please call 617.859.2446 or email mmurray@bpl.org.
  • Volunteer Opportunities: The Library seeks volunteers to work with either adult English as a Second Language (ESL) learners or adults who are in need of developing basic reading and writing skills towards their individual life goals.  For example, some volunteers may work with a small group of 2-4 ESL learners or facilitate a large drop-in group of 5 – 25 people who are looking to improve their conversational English. Other volunteers may work with an individual helping him or her to improve basic literacy skills for employment or for tests such as the HiSet. For more information please call 617.859.2446 or email mmurray@bpl.org.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

# # #

 

Boston Public Library Announces January-May 2017 Author Talks, Lowell Lecture Series

Posted on January 10th, 2017 by rlavery in General

bpl-brochure-author-talks-wint-spring-2017-r12digitalopt-1Boston Public Library’s January – May 2017 Author Talks and Lowell Lecture Series begin this month, featuring an array of talented writers and topics, highlighted by award-winning and bestselling authors Neil Gaiman and Colum McCann. Hear authors read from their books, purchase a copy and have it signed, and learn about the creative process that gets such magnificent stories told. The 2016 – 2017 Lowell Lectures Series commemorates William Shakespeare in the 400th anniversary year of his death and features transformative coming-of-age authors. All talks and lectures are free and open to the public, and are held at the Central Library in Copley Square, 700 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116.

“We are extremely pleased to welcome so many notable authors in the first half of 2017 and are grateful to the Lowell Institute for their collaboration; we look forward to what promises to be a season of compelling and thoughtful talks and lectures,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

For full event descriptions, visit http://www.bpl.org/programs/author_series.htm.

Full schedule:

Tuesday, January 24 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Julie Rodriguez and Piotr Kaczmarek, author of Visualizing Financial Data

 

Thursday, January 26 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

David Grinspoon, author of Earth in Human Hands: Shaping Our Planet’s Future

 

Thursday, February 2 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Twists, Turns, and Double Crosses: Boston Thriller Writers Hank Phillippi Ryan and Peter Swanson

 

Wednesday, February 22 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Christina Baker Kline, author of Piece of the World  

 

Tuesday, February 28 ● 6:30 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Romance Fiction Panel with Eloisa James, Lauren Willig, and Sarah MacLean

Moderated by Caroline Linden, author of Six Degrees of Scandal

 

Thursday, March 2 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Joseph Luzzi: From Twain to Toni Morrison—A Literary Journey through America

 

Monday, March 6 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Nicole Galland: The Play’s the Thing—Shakespeare on Stage

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Thursday, March 16 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Kate Clifford Larson: Harriet Tubman, Mary Surratt, and Rosemary Kennedy

Wednesday, March 22 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Reginald Dwayne Betts: An Evening of Poetry

 

Tuesday, March 28 ● 6:30 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Noam Maggor, author of Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age

 

Tuesday, April 4 ● 6 p.m.
Rabb Hall, Central Library
Lowell Lecture Series – Neil Gaiman, author
Moderated by Jared Bowen, Executive Arts Editor for WGBH
*Requires event sign up

 

Thursday, April 6 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Marjorie Garber: Desperately Seeking Shakespeare

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Wednesday, April 12 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Colum McCann, author of Letters to a Young Writer

 

Wednesday, May 3 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Ken Ludwig, author of How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Thursday, May 11 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Richard Taylor, author of Martha’s Vineyard: Race, Property, and the Power of Place

 

Tuesday, May 16 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Dr. James O’Connell, author of Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor

 

About the LOWELL LECTURE SERIES

The Lowell Institute has sponsored free public lectures and other educational programs throughout the Boston area since its founding in 1836 by businessman John Lowell, Jr. Over the decades thousands of members of the Boston community have attended Lowell lectures on topics ranging from science to the arts to humanities, from literature to politics to world affairs. The Lowell Institute’s mission since its inception—to inform the populace regardless of gender, race or economic status—has led to the establishment of other great Boston institutions, including the Harvard Extension School and WGBH. Today, the Institute continues to pioneer education and fund innovative projects such as the current expansion of the Lowell Institute School at Northeastern, which was recently awarded a “First in the World” grant for innovative educational programming by the Department of Education. To this day, the Lowell Institute continues to provide a wide variety of free public lectures and educational programming throughout the city of Boston.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

# # #

City of Boston Achieves Energy Efficiency Gains with Capital Improvements to Its Iconic Buildings

Posted on January 10th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Mayor Martin J. Walsh today announced recent capital improvements to three of its iconic buildings completed by City of Boston Public Facilities Department will yield nearly $50,000 in annual utility savings for the lifetime of the installed improvements at the Central Library in Copley Square, City Hall and 26 Court Street. The project will also eliminate over 140 tons of greenhouse gas emissions each year, which is equivalent to removing more than 40 cars from the road for a year.

“I am proud Boston is leading by example in pursuing environmentally-friendly, sustainable and cost-saving options for our improvement projects,” said Mayor Walsh. “These improvements are a win-win effort, and I look forward to continuing our collaborative efforts with utility partners to continue making progress towards becoming a more energy efficient city.”

Boston’s Public Facilities Department partnered with Eversource on the comprehensive building infrastructure and energy efficiency upgrade projects, with Eversource providing technical expertise and helping the City secure Mass Save program incentives to offset the overall cost of the upgrades to the three buildings. Read more »

Boston Public Library Announces January – May 2017 Local & Family History Series

Posted on January 4th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s January – May 2017 Local and Family History Series shares information about the history of Boston and its diverse neighborhoods, along with tips and guides for those beginning their own genealogical research. Visit www.bpl.org/programs/local_family_history_series.htm to learn more. The Series features a wealth of topics, from New England population shifts and finding your Italian family to Boston’s women shipbuilders for the Navy and the history of Ellis Island:

Wednesday, January 18 • 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon

Migrations out of New England

Christopher Child, Senior Genealogist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society’s Newbury Street Press, explores how to take into account New England’s population shifts, movement, and migration when researching your ancestors.

­­­­­­­­­­

Wednesday, February 1 • 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon

Stephen Puleo, author of American Treasures: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Gettysburg Address

Stephen Puleo’s American Treasures charts the creation and journeys of priceless American documents and shows how their ideas embody fundamental values of liberty and equality.

Wednesday, February 15 • 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon

Andiamo! Finding Your Italian Family

Genealogical researcher Margaret Fortier explores why Italians immigrated to America, what they found when they arrived, and Italian family naming patterns.

Wednesday, March 15 • 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon

Finding Your Revolutionary War Ancestors at the Massachusetts Archives

John Hannigan, Head of Reference Services at the Massachusetts Archives, highlights resources available to help researchers reconstruct the military experiences of Revolutionary soldiers from Massachusetts.

Wednesday, March 29 • 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon

Boston’s Women Shipbuilders for the Navy, 1942‒1945

Polly Kienle from the Interpretation Division at Boston National Historical Park discusses the impact of the approximately 8,000 women who worked at Charlestown Navy Yard during World War II.

Wednesday, April 5 • 6 p.m.

Abbey Room

Boston and the American Revolution

Professor Robert Allison of Suffolk University examines why the Revolution began and why Bostonians were more rebellious than other British subjects in North America.

Wednesday, April 19 • 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon

Vincent Cannato, author of American Passage: The History of Ellis Island

Vincent Cannato, history lecturer at University of Massachusetts Boston, discusses Ellis Island’s history, from immigration and deportation center to icon.

Wednesday, May 10 • 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon

Oral Interviews: Connect with the Living Past

Genealogical speaker Lori Lyn Price gives you tips for capturing genealogical information and family stories by conducting oral interviews.

Wednesday, May 24 • 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon

Using Historical Urban Atlases for Family History Research

Evan Thornberry, Cartographic Reference Librarian at the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library, explores how urban maps can help you determine where your ancestors lived along with details such as house and block numbers and building materials.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

# # #