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Boston Public Library’s February Literary Events and Black History Month Programs

Posted on February 1st, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases
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booksBoston Public Library’s February literary events and programming include lectures by authors whose works cover various genres, and the Library honors Black History Month with films, discussions, activities, story times, and more.

Author talks:

 

  • Stephen Puleo speaks about his book American Treasures: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Gettysburg Address on Wednesday, February 1, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Join Boston thriller writers Hank Phillippi Ryan and Peter Swanson for “Twists, Turns, and Double Crosses” on Thursday, February 2, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Margaret Fortier gives a lecture “Andiamo! Finding Your Italian Family” on Wednesday, February 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Therese Sellers, author of Alpha Is for Anthropos: an Ancient Greek Alphabet, will read from her book and lead participants in designing and painting medallions inspired by the beautiful illustrations on Wednesday, February 22, at 2 p.m. at the South End Branch. Located at 685 Tremont Street. Especially for children – tweens, ages 8-14.
  • Christina Baker Kline discusses Piece of the World, which explores the life of Christina Olson, a lifelong resident of Cushing, Maine, sufferer of polio, and an American icon as the subject of the Andrew Wyeth painting Christina’s World on Wednesday, February 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Join bestselling authors Eloisa James, Lauren Willig, and Sarah MacLean for a romance fiction panel to discuss their works on Tuesday, February 28, at 6:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

Black History Month programming:

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  • Passage at St. Augustine Screenings & Discussion: The award-winning documentary tells the story of those who fought the 18-month battle that led directly to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The discussions will be led by filmmaker Clennon L. King and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones.
  • Kids’ Art Club explores and responds to the contributions of artists such as the Gees Bend quilters, Faith Ringgold, and Jean Michel Basquiat on Tuesdays at 4:30 p.m. during the month of February at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street.
  • Celebrate Black History Month with stories about African Americans who have made their marks on history, music, and more on Saturday, February 4, at 11 a.m. and on Saturday, February 25 at 11 a.m. in the Central Library in Copley Square’s Children’s Library.
  • A showing of the film Selma and a discussion of how the past relates to the present takes place on Thursday, February 9, at 5 p.m. at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester.
  • Explore the BPL’s print and online resources to aid in researching African American history on Wednesday, February 15, at 2 p.m. in the Community Learning Center Classroom at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • On Tuesday, February 21, at 3 p.m., Michele Brooks leads an art workshop in which participants will make MLK Jr.-inspired peace and unity collages (for ages 5-12) at the Roslindale Branch, located at 4246 Washington Street. The same workshop takes place on Wednesday, February 22, at 11 a.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.
  • Celebrate Black History Month with Janice Allen on Tuesday, February 21, at 3:30 p.m. at the Central Library in Copley Square’s Children’s Library, located at 700 Boylston Street. Janice uses her melodic voice and percussion instruments to engage the audience in stories through song.
  • The film Men of Honor will be shown on Thursday, February 23, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. The film tells the story of Carl Brashear, the first African American U.S. Navy Diver, and the man who trained him. Part of the Never Too Late Series.
  • The Living Archive: African American Poetry, a series of panel discussions by poets and writers examining a range of topics that include the importance and significance of African American literature, takes place on Thursday, February 23, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • American storyteller and cultural lecturer Desiree Taylor gives a presentation “Dreams Deferred: Stories of Hope through an African American Lens” on Thursday, February 23, at 6:30 p.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.
  • A screening of Never Give Up: Ama’s Journey to Freedom on the Underground Railroad, followed by a discussion, takes place on Monday, February 27, at 3 p.m. for children in grades 5-10 at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street.
  • Children are invited to a jazzy story time on Tuesday, February 28, at 10:30 a.m. to celebrate the contributions of African American musicians to American culture at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library Celebrates Black History Month with “Black Is” Booklist

Posted on February 1st, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

black isBoston Public Library honors Black History Month with its annual “Black Is” booklist, a list of recent books concerning the African American experience compiled by staff librarians for all to enjoy. Categories of books include graphic, historical, international, mystery, and urban fiction, and biography/memoir, expressions, and history and contemporary issues in nonfiction. Copies of the booklist will be available at all library locations this week.

“Boston Public Library is proud to celebrate Black History Month by providing readers with a guide to the wealth of new literature that explores important topics related to the African American experience, and I am thankful to our booklist committee for their insightful recommendations and invite everyone to pick up these works ,” said Boston Public Library President David Leonard.

The list includes authors like Congressmen Cory Booker and John Lewis, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Marcus Samuelsson, Pat Cleveland, Phoebe Robinson, Rita Dove, and more.

Previous “Black Is” booklists can be found via www.bpl.org/research/adultbooklists/blackis.htm. Boston Public Library staff also celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with an annual “Latino Life” Booklist, and for the first time this year, will publish a “Pride Is” booklist in June.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Mayor’s Office of Arts and Culture Partners with Berklee College of Music to Host Boston Day of Reflection at the Boston Public Library

Posted on January 31st, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases
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On Saturday, February 4, 2017 the Mayor’s Office of Arts and Culture will join with the Berklee College of Music to present the Boston Day of Reflection: Creating a More Caring and Just Community in Rabb Hall at the Boston Public Library’s Central Library in Copley Square. This free, all-day event includes an expert panel on campus inclusiveness, a presentation and Q&A by Lesléa Newman, and a performance by noted singer/songwriter Melissa Ferrick.

Boston Day of Reflection: Creating a More Caring and Just Community will begin at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, February 4, 2017 at the Central Library. Refreshments will be served from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Julie Burros, Chief of Arts and Culture for the City of Boston, will offer welcoming remarks at 10:00 a.m.

The first panel, How to Create a More Inclusive College Community, will be presented by the Boston ProArts Consortium. Panelists include Brenda Bailey, Assistant Director of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at Massachusetts College of Art; Neil Donohoe, Dean of Theater, Boston Conservatory; Tamia Jordan, Director, Intercultural Student Affairs, Emerson College; Rene Pfister, Voice Faculty, Berklee; Daniel Soghomonian, Phonathon Manager, Berklee; and will be moderated by Kevin Johnson, Director, Office for Diversity and Inclusion, Berklee. The panel will take place from 10:15 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Lesléa Newman will present He Continues to Make a Difference: The Story of Matthew Shepard from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Newman is the author of 70 books for readers of all ages. She is the author of Heather Has Two Mommies, the first children’s book to portray lesbian families in a positive way. Newman is also the author of many books for adults that deal with lesbian identity, Jewish identity, and the intersection and collision between the two. Read more »

Boston Public Library’s 2017 Literacy Services Offerings

Posted on January 24th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases
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Boston Public Library begins 2017 with a full slate of literacy resources and opportunities for learners throughout Boston and the Commonwealth, including ESL classes and conversation groups, HiSet preparation classes, online tools, and immigrant information material. Visit www.bpl.org/research/literacy.htm for a complete list of offerings and services.

 

  • ESL Classes: ESL instruction is offered in a traditional classroom environment. Classes range from beginner – for people with little or no experience with English – to high-intermediate. Classes are free; however, registration is required. For more information and to register please call 617.859.2446 or email mmurray@bpl.org. Please visit bpl.org/branches/ESL_groups.pdf for the complete schedule.
  • ESL Conversation Groups: Practice speaking English in an informal and friendly group setting with other adult ESL students and new English speakers. Groups are led by a native English speaker. Please visit bpl.org/branches/ESL_groups.pdf for the complete schedule.
  • HiSet Preparation Classes: The HiSet test (High School Equivalency Test) is the new replacement to the GED test. Classes are offered on Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. through March 22 at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue, and on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 12 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. through March 23 at the Fields Corner Branch, located at 1520 Dorchester Avenue.
  • Immigrant Information Corners: Immigrant Information Corners, located at all 24 Boston Public Library locations, are a strategic collaboration between the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), Boston Public Library, and the City of Boston, as well as community partners.  They are meant to serve as information stations for Boston’s immigrants and refugees, giving access to citizenship and other immigration-related materials in multiple languages, information about citizenship preparation assistance, as well as information about financial empowerment resources.
  • Learn Online & Literacy Resources:
  • LearningExpress Library—Log on and practice for SAT, GED, HiSet, TOEFL, and other education tests. Learn-A-Test is interactive and is based on official tests that will help you improve your scores on academic, civil service, military, and professional licensing and certification exams. It provides immediate scoring, complete answer explanations, and individualized analysis of your score. All you need is your BPL card or eCard number.
  • Mango Languages—Mango Languages is a great online language learning program for both English and foreign languages.  For the English learning component, users can select their native language as the language through which they learn English.
  • Literacy Resources:

Research Guide: Literacy Resources for Adult ESL and ABE Educators

Research Guide: Literacy Resources for ABE and ESL Learners

  • Small Group Tutoring: Both English as a Second Language (ESL) and Adult Basic Education (ABE) skills instruction are offered.  ESL groups are composed of 2-4 participants and one native-English speaking tutor.  Participants have the chance to work on improving their conversational skills, as well as reading and writing.  ABE groups traditionally have less students and focus on improving basic reading and writing skills toward individual student goals.  For more information and to register please call 617.859.2446 or email mmurray@bpl.org.
  • Volunteer Opportunities: The Library seeks volunteers to work with either adult English as a Second Language (ESL) learners or adults who are in need of developing basic reading and writing skills towards their individual life goals.  For example, some volunteers may work with a small group of 2-4 ESL learners or facilitate a large drop-in group of 5 – 25 people who are looking to improve their conversational English. Other volunteers may work with an individual helping him or her to improve basic literacy skills for employment or for tests such as the HiSet. For more information please call 617.859.2446 or email mmurray@bpl.org.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library Announces January-May 2017 Author Talks, Lowell Lecture Series

Posted on January 10th, 2017 by rlavery in General

bpl-brochure-author-talks-wint-spring-2017-r12digitalopt-1Boston Public Library’s January – May 2017 Author Talks and Lowell Lecture Series begin this month, featuring an array of talented writers and topics, highlighted by award-winning and bestselling authors Neil Gaiman and Colum McCann. Hear authors read from their books, purchase a copy and have it signed, and learn about the creative process that gets such magnificent stories told. The 2016 – 2017 Lowell Lectures Series commemorates William Shakespeare in the 400th anniversary year of his death and features transformative coming-of-age authors. All talks and lectures are free and open to the public, and are held at the Central Library in Copley Square, 700 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116.

“We are extremely pleased to welcome so many notable authors in the first half of 2017 and are grateful to the Lowell Institute for their collaboration; we look forward to what promises to be a season of compelling and thoughtful talks and lectures,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

For full event descriptions, visit http://www.bpl.org/programs/author_series.htm.

Full schedule:

Tuesday, January 24 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Julie Rodriguez and Piotr Kaczmarek, author of Visualizing Financial Data

 

Thursday, January 26 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

David Grinspoon, author of Earth in Human Hands: Shaping Our Planet’s Future

 

Thursday, February 2 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Twists, Turns, and Double Crosses: Boston Thriller Writers Hank Phillippi Ryan and Peter Swanson

 

Wednesday, February 22 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Christina Baker Kline, author of Piece of the World  

 

Tuesday, February 28 ● 6:30 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Romance Fiction Panel with Eloisa James, Lauren Willig, and Sarah MacLean

Moderated by Caroline Linden, author of Six Degrees of Scandal

 

Thursday, March 2 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Joseph Luzzi: From Twain to Toni Morrison—A Literary Journey through America

 

Monday, March 6 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Nicole Galland: The Play’s the Thing—Shakespeare on Stage

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Thursday, March 16 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Kate Clifford Larson: Harriet Tubman, Mary Surratt, and Rosemary Kennedy

Wednesday, March 22 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Reginald Dwayne Betts: An Evening of Poetry

 

Tuesday, March 28 ● 6:30 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Noam Maggor, author of Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age

 

Tuesday, April 4 ● 6 p.m.
Rabb Hall, Central Library
Lowell Lecture Series – Neil Gaiman, author
Moderated by Jared Bowen, Executive Arts Editor for WGBH
*Requires event sign up

 

Thursday, April 6 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Marjorie Garber: Desperately Seeking Shakespeare

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Wednesday, April 12 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Colum McCann, author of Letters to a Young Writer

 

Wednesday, May 3 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Ken Ludwig, author of How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Thursday, May 11 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Richard Taylor, author of Martha’s Vineyard: Race, Property, and the Power of Place

 

Tuesday, May 16 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Dr. James O’Connell, author of Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor

 

About the LOWELL LECTURE SERIES

The Lowell Institute has sponsored free public lectures and other educational programs throughout the Boston area since its founding in 1836 by businessman John Lowell, Jr. Over the decades thousands of members of the Boston community have attended Lowell lectures on topics ranging from science to the arts to humanities, from literature to politics to world affairs. The Lowell Institute’s mission since its inception—to inform the populace regardless of gender, race or economic status—has led to the establishment of other great Boston institutions, including the Harvard Extension School and WGBH. Today, the Institute continues to pioneer education and fund innovative projects such as the current expansion of the Lowell Institute School at Northeastern, which was recently awarded a “First in the World” grant for innovative educational programming by the Department of Education. To this day, the Lowell Institute continues to provide a wide variety of free public lectures and educational programming throughout the city of Boston.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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