Press Room

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and the Boston Public Library Host First Community Meeting on Design for Roslindale Branch Renovation

Posted on October 5th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Under the leadership of Mayor Martin J. Walsh, the Boston Public Library will host the first community advisory committee meeting to discuss the design for the estimated $6.4 million renovation of the Roslindale Branch on Tuesday, October 17, at 6 p.m. at the branch’s location at 4246 Washington Street. The renovation is a capital project collaboration between the Boston Public Library and the City of Boston’s Public Facilities Department. Leers Weinzapfel Associates is the architecture firm selected for the project and will reconfigure the layout of the interior of the building utilizing the existing planning study as a starting point, completed with the community in 2013, which the firm also lead. All are invited.

“The first design meeting offers community members a key opportunity to provide input on how they envision the Roslindale Branch best serving its patrons for the future, and we welcome all ideas and feedback as we take this significant step together to reimagine and update the library’s space and services,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. Read more »

Boston Public Library and Boston Philharmonic Orchestra: A New Overture

Posted on September 29th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Ben Zander headshot 2 )Boston Public Library (BPL) and Boston Philharmonic Orchestra (BPO) will offer free performances across the city in a new collaborative venture beginning on Saturday, September 30, at 10 a.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, with one of Maestro Benjamin Zander’s world-renowned interpretation classes, Interpretations of Music: Lessons for Life. The partnership program also includes additional concerts in Rabb Hall, several Concerts in the Courtyard in summer 2018, and educational concerts in up to 12 branch libraries through May 12, 2018. All classes are open to the public. The first Interpretation Class features works by J.S. Bach, Mahler, and Cassado.

“This unique collaboration with Boston Philharmonic Orchestra furthers Boston Public Library’s commitment to bringing its collections and spaces to life, with a wide range of cultural programs, and celebrates the work of talented musicians and strong partners such as the BPO,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. “We hope this is the first of many opportunities in the music and performance space, continuing to bring the library and its collections to life.”

“I am very excited about the first class in the series at the Boston Public Library this Saturday at 10 a.m.,” adds Benjamin Zander, founder and conductor of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra and Boston Philharmonic Youth Orchestra. “We will work on a movement of one of the Bach cello suites for viola, two heavenly Mahler songs, and a brilliant show piece for cello with three fabulously gifted young performers.  I guarantee that we will all walk out at 12 with our spirits lifted and our hearts opened, in the way that only great music can.  Bring a youngster, so that we can reveal the magical world of classical music.” Read more »

GrubStreet and Boston Public Library to Offer Free Creative Writing Classes in Egleston Square and Mattapan

Posted on September 28th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

GrubStreet, one of the nation’s leading creative writing centers, and Boston Public Library (BPL) have announced the relaunch of their neighborhood writing program, Write Down the Street. Together, the organizations will offer free creative writing workshops at BPL’s Egleston Square and Mattapan branches. This fall marks the second year of the program.

Participants can choose from low-commitment drop-in classes or a six-week bilingual writing workshop. Each drop-in session focuses on a unique theme, including natural disasters, immigration stories, and food.

The fall term of Write Down the Street will launch on Friday, October 6 with a six-week bilingual writing workshop at the Egleston Square Branch of the Boston Public Library, followed by drop-in classes at the Mattapan Branch of the Boston Public Library, beginning Tuesday, October 17.  BPL’s Teen Central at the Central Library and GrubStreet will also offer free teen classes, starting with a podcasting series that begins October 3.

“No matter your writing experience, these workshops are a great way to do fun exercises, get inspired by other writers, and receive feedback from classmates, if you choose to share your work,” says Denise Delgado, Write Down the Street instructor and GrubStreet Program Fellow.

Write Down the Street workshops not only provide free writing opportunities but also create inclusive spaces for writers. Workshop readings highlight literature by international writers and authors of color. The program also provides flexibility for caretakers, allowing participants to bring their families to drop-in sessions. With funding from the Calderwood Foundation, GrubStreet and the BPL will be expanding to offer free drop-in workshops for teens in the near future.

“The goal of Write Down the Street is to ensure that everyone in the city who wants to participate in the literary arts has access to great instruction and community,” says GrubStreet’s Executive Director, Eve Bridburg. “We believe in creating opportunity for communities currently underrepresented in publishing. Our hope is to help a diverse range of writers get inspired, hone their work and find audiences.”

“Boston Public Library is excited to collaborate once again with GrubStreet on the Write Down the Street program,” says David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. “We had a great turnout last year at our Egleston Square and Grove Hall branches. This fall we look forward to engaging members of the Egleston Square and Mattapan writing communities, welcoming teens into the program, and we hope to expand this program to even more locations in the future.”

To learn more about these classes and for program updates, visit https://grubstreet.org/programs/neighborhood-classes/.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

About GRUBSTREET

Founded in 1997, GrubStreet has grown into the nation’s largest independent creative writing center. By rigorously developing voices of every type and talent and by removing barriers to entry, GrubStreet fosters the creation of meaningful stories and ensures that excellent writing remains vital and relevant. We offer over five hundred classes and events a year for writers of all genres and ambitions—from first-time poets or fledgling memoirists to MFA graduates and published novelists. Our flagship conference, The Muse and the Marketplace, was recently named “the #1 writing conference in North America” by The Writer Magazine, and attracts more than 800 attendees every year in Boston for three days of interactive sessions, meetings, and events.  For more information, please visit www.grubstreet.org and http://museandthemarketplace.com.

 

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Boston Public Library’s October Author Talks & Lectures

Posted on September 25th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s October author talks and lectures feature a range of authors and topics, including public art, libraries and the digital age, health policy, Boston’s immigration history, southern food & civil rights, and more:

  • The South Boston Historical Society presents an author talk with Jim Lynch, who discusses the lives of three generations making a living on Boston’s waterfront in his novel The Longshoremen: Life on the Waterfront on Monday, October 2, at 6:30 p.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.
  • Margaret Newell, author and vice chair of the History Department at Ohio State University, explores the stories of Indians enslaved by English colonists in New England and shows how they influenced New England society in crucial ways, including by exposing their captors to Native religion, foods, and technology and fighting for citizenship in cases that had implications for all enslaved peoples in 18th-century America. Wednesday, October 4, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The Boston University Center for the Humanities forum “Recording Lives: Libraries and Archives in the Digital Age” features Robert Darnton, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor, Emeritus & University Librarian, Emeritus, Harvard University on Thursday, October 5, at 5:30 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Westy Egmont and Alvaro Lima unpack the stories behind the maps in the Leventhal Map Center’s exhibition, Who We Are: Boston Immigration Then and Now. Lima examines how transnationalism pushes the boundaries of traditional nation-state rules for citizenship, political rights, and migration, and Egmont discusses how diversity can foster a pluralistic world view and secure communities. After the talk, audience members will be invited to re-examine Who We Are. Thursday, October 5, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Dan Logan speaks about his first book The Dance Dragon, in which he overcomes his fear of dancing and puts forth the effort to learn on Thursday, October 5, at 6:30 p.m. at the West End Branch, located at 151 Cambridge Street.
  • Pediatrician Dr. Laura Gold reads from The Silenced Child, which describes the importance of listening in parent/child and doctor/patient relationships on Tuesday, October 10, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes series.
  • In The Health of Newcomers, Wendy E. Parmet and Patricia Illingworth draw on rigorous legal and ethical arguments and empirical studies, as well as personal stories of immigrant struggles, to make the compelling case that global phenomena such as poverty, the medical brain drain, organ tourism, and climate change ought to inform the health policy we craft for newcomers and natives alike. Thursday, October 12, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Kevin Devlin discusses The Southie Pact, which describes the damage that drugs do to ordinary people and to their community on Saturday, October 14,at  11 a.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.
  • Claire McMillan, author of The Necklace, and Denise Kiernan, author of The Last Castle: The Epic Story of Love, Loss, and American Royalty in the Nation’s Largest Home speak about their respective books on Saturday, October 14, at 12:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Nancy Schön, best-known for her iconic Make Way for Ducklings sculpture in Boston’s Public Garden, explores her major public projects and commissions, what inspired them, and what goes into making a beautiful and tactile work of public art in Make Way for Nancy on Thursday, October 19, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Schön will be interviewed by Anita Diamant, author of The Red Tent and The Boston Girl.
  • Frederick Douglass Opie, author of Southern Food and Civil Rights: Feeding the Revolution shares the ways southern food nourished the fight for freedom going back ages along with cherished recipes associated with the era. Monday, October 23, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Lisa Berenson, director of Educational Programming and Development at the Jewish Cemetery Association of Massachusetts, discusses an ambitious initiative to transform and restore a former Jewish mortuary chapel in East Boston into a state-of-the-art exhibit hall on the history of immigration in the Boston area. Wednesday, October 25, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Erica Ferencik details The River at Night, set against the harsh beauty of the Maine wilderness, which charts the journey of four friends as they fight to survive the aftermath of a white water rafting accident on Thursday, October 26, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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BPL Bingo: A Chat with a Winner

Posted on September 18th, 2017 by awilliams in General

BingoThis summer, adults across Boston had as much fun with summer reading as kids, thanks to BPL Bingo. Adults picked up or downloaded a BPL Bingo card and read various books and completed activities for a chance to win prizes, including Duck Boat tickets, BPL totes, pens, and mugs, Barnes & Noble gift cards, and more. The Adams Street Branch winner, Boston Public Schools teacher Mary O’Brien, chats with us about her experience playing BPL Bingo.

How many books/activities did you read/do as part of BPL Bingo?
I completed roughly 20.

What was your favorite book you read?
The Little Old Lady Who Broke All the Rules by Catharina Ingelman-Sundberg – a librarian I work with gave it to me as a gift. It was very funny, and I listed it under the “recommended by a librarian” box.

BPLBingoDid you read a book/genre for BPL Bingo that you normally wouldn’t have read?
I read last year’s Newbery Award winner, The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill, to fulfill the childhood classic category. I am not a fan of fantasy, so I was surprised that I enjoyed it!

Which of the activities did you complete?
I visited several of the new branches of the BPL – East Boston, Mattapan, and Jamaica Plain.

What was your overall experience? Will you do it again next year?
Yes! I teach 2nd grade in BPS, so summer is my free time to read and catch up. I’m hoping next year has new reading categories to choose from!

Look out for BPL Bingo to come back next summer, with more great reading categories, activities, and prizes!