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Boston Public Library’s March Author Talks and Shakespeare Commemorative Programs

Posted on March 1st, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases
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marchBoston Public Library’s March author talks and programs include celebrations of poetry, Women’s History Month, Shakespeare, new works, and more:

  • Joseph Luzzi’s lecture “From Twain to Toni Morrison: A Literary Journey through America” leads participants through the fascinating world of American literature, revealing the character and conflicts of the American spirit on Thursday, March 2, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Ellen B. Alden discusses her work Your Faithfully, Florence Burke, the story of her great-great-grandfather’s struggle as an Irish immigrant in America, on Saturday, March 11, at 12 p.m. at the Fields Corner Branch, located at 1520 Dorchester Avenue, and on Monday, March 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street in Dorchester.
  • Stephen Kinzer reads from his new book True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire on Tuesday, March 14, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes Series.
  • In celebration of Women’s History Month, author and historian Kate Clifford Larson discusses the lives of Harriet Tubman, Mary Surratt, and Rosemary Kennedy, the subjects of her critically-acclaimed biographies on Thursday, March 16, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The Friends of the South Boston Branch hold a book sale on Saturday, March 18, at 10 a.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.
  • Stephen Kurkjian shares passages from Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled off the World’s Greatest Art Heist on Monday, March 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the East Boston Branch, located at 365 Bremen Street.
  • Reginald Dwayne Betts reads from his two critically-acclaimed collections of poetry, Shahid Reads His Own Palm and Bastards of the Reagan Era, discusses the power of language, and examines the important intersection of art and social justice on Wednesday, March 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Noam Maggor, author of Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age, discusses his work on Tuesday, March 28, at 6:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Gish Jen reads from her new book Girl at the Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap on Tuesday, March 28, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes series.

All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library commemorates the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. From September 2016 to June 2017, discover the Bard’s lasting legacy with dozens of programs system wide connecting audiences to theater and the dramatic arts.

March Shakespeare programs:

  • Shakespeare to Hip Hop: Hip hop poet and actor Marlon Carey and slam poetry champion and educator Regie Gibson team up with musicians to create an energetic literary performance combining poetry, spoken word, story, song, and rap on Friday, March 3, at 12 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Nicole Galland celebrates Shakespeare in her part lecture, part performance “The Play’s the Thing: Shakespeare on Stage” on Monday, March 6, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Erika Bailey, American Repertory Theater Institute Head of Voice and Speech, offers tips and tutorials for effective public speaking on Tuesday, March 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Tour the Library’s Shakespeare Unauthorized exhibition with Curator Jay Moschella on Thursday, March 9, at 2 p.m. and on Thursday, March 23, at 2 p.m. in the McKim Exhibition Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. The exhibition is on view through March 31.
  • Visit the Children’s Library for activity stations that celebrate Shakespeare’s work on Saturday, March 11, at 3 p.m. in the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Marlon Carey and Regie Gibson perform Shakespeare’s sonnets and soliloquies for all ages on Tuesday, March 14, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Children make various styles of masks over the course of a three-week workshop with Boston Puppeteers Cooperative for ages 6 and older beginning Thursday, March 16, at 3:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Megan Hinckley, American Repertory Theater Director of Development, discusses the process of fundraising for nonprofit theater organizations on Tuesday, March 21, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Gnomeo and Juliet will be shown on Sunday, March 26, at 2 p.m.in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Seven Times Salt performs “Easy as Lying: Music of Shakespeare’s” on Sunday, March 26, at 2:30 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Children ages 8 and older discuss Unstoppable Octobia May on Friday, March 31, at 3:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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A Message from President David Leonard

Posted on February 10th, 2017 by rlavery in General

To the Boston Public Library Community:

During this time of uncertainty the Boston Public Library remains a constant for our community, as it has since its founding in 1848.

Dedicated to the advancement of learning, the Boston Public Library serves “to educate the people as the safeguard of order and liberty.” That conviction and our promise to be Free to All are carved into the façade of the McKim building at the Central Library in Copley Square and illustrate our commitment to providing all Bostonians, Massachusetts residents, and visitors with library services.

Each day when we open our doors we pledge to offer our communities reading and literacy services, stimulating and relevant programs, welcoming spaces, access to information and technology, and engagement with our cultural heritage.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh is resolute that Boston is and will remain a city of inclusion. The American Library Association and the Association of Research Libraries, to name two of the affiliations we hold close, have made affirming declarations of their commitments to equity, diversity, inclusion, and access. Boston Public Library and the 480+ staff members who serve our 26 locations are proud to stand with the Mayor and our library affiliates to reassert that we are Free to All and here to welcome everyone equally regardless of gender, race, national origin, sexual orientation, faith, or economic status.

Our library services must remain available to all, without fear of discrimination. We work to help our users navigate the world. Whether they seek Boston Public Library services for intellectual growth, self-inquiry, academic support, or a multitude of other reasons, we serve as advocates for personal advancement and for clarifying the pathways to that achievement. And we will always protect our users’ rights to privacy in so doing.

It is in times of uncertainty when we as an institution must reflect on and recommit to our founding principles—preserved in granite—that are the foundation from which every patron interaction originates.

 

David Leonard

President, Boston Public Library.

 

 

Boston Public Library and February School Vacation Week Programming

Posted on February 6th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library is offering engaging programming for children and teens during February school vacation week from February 18-24, sponsored by the Highland Street Foundation and with support from Boston Public Library Foundation donors. For a complete list of offerings at locations across the city this week, visit www.bpl.org/calendar.

“We are grateful to the Highland Street Foundation for their ongoing support and for ensuring we can continue to providing youth and their caregivers fun, educational, and entertaining programming this week,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

Schedule:

Hansel and Gretel with the Boston Lyric Opera

Join Boston Lyric Opera to learn how to bring the story of Hansel and Gretel to life through music, acting, and movement. Two professional singers, a pianist, and a teaching artist will engage audiences in this interactive introduction to opera through a one-hour retelling of the Brothers Grimm classic fairytale.  Ideal for youth ages 6-12. Younger children are welcome with supervision.

Saturday, February 18 ● 11 a.m. ● Central Library – Children’s Library

Tuesday, February 21 ● 11 a.m. ● Dudley Branch

Tuesday, February 21 ● 2 p.m. ● Egleston Square Branch

Wednesday, February 22 ● 1:30 p.m. ● West End Branch (pre-registration required, contact branch)

Thursday, February 23 ● 2 p.m. ● Faneuil Branch

Friday, February 24 ● 2 p.m. ● Adams Street Branch

 

The Pineapple Project

Please join us for the Pineapple Project, an original play about gender, creativity, and each child’s freedom to be who they are. The Pineapple Project was born during a moment of play between actor Mal Malme and her niece in which her niece said “Boys Can’t Be Princesses!” As a gender non-conforming person and theater artist, Mal couldn’t ignore this statement. This led Mal and colleagues Becca A. Lewis and Renee Farster-Degenhardt to create a theatre piece for children ages 3-8 to broaden the gender conversation and validate each child’s identity.

Tuesday, February 21 ● 10:30 a.m. ● Uphams Corner Branch

Tuesday, February 21 ● 2 p.m. ● Brighton Branch

Wednesday, February 22 ● 10:30 a.m. ● Fields Corner Branch

Wednesday, February 22 ● 3:30 p.m. ● Honan-Allston Branch

Thursday, February 23 ● 10:30 a.m. ● Connolly Branch

Thursday, February 23 ● 3 p.m. ● Charlestown Branch

Friday, February 24 ● 10:30 a.m. ● North End Branch

Friday, February 24 ● 2:30 p.m. ● East Boston Branch

 

Youth Concert Series with Judy Pancoast

Join Grammy nominee Judy Pancoast for a “Cabin Fever Reliever” concert where we’ll dance, sing, and chase away the winter blues!

Tuesday, February 21 ● 10:30 a.m. ● Lower Mills Branch

Thursday, February 23 ● 10:30 a.m. ● Central Library – Children’s Library

Thursday, February 23 ● 1 p.m. ● South Boston Branch

Friday, February 24 ● 11 a.m. ● West Roxbury Branch

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library Announces Wedding Ceremony Giveaway

Posted on February 6th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases
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weddingSix lucky couples to exchange vows in the courtyard of one of Boston’s most historic institutions this June for free

Boston Public Library is offering six couples the chance to exchange vows surrounded by thousands of love stories on Sunday, June 11, 2017 in the iconic Italianate courtyard at the Central Library. Beginning Monday, February 6 through Sunday, March 12, 2017 an online lottery will be available via www.bpl.org/ceremonygiveaway. Couples will be randomly selected and notified no later than Monday, March 13, 2017.

“Long a much sought-after wedding venue, this initiative offers everyone regardless of economic capacity a chance to have Boston Public Library be a part of their lives on this special occasion, and we hope to see many applicants with a strong Boston or Massachusetts connection apply,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. “I extend my thanks to our sponsors whose efforts will enhance these ceremonies and provide lasting memories for the newlyweds.”

Each of the selected couples will be invited to the Boston Public Library’s Central Library for a morning wedding ceremony while the building is closed to the public. Included in the package are pre-ceremony light breakfast and beverages compliments of The Catered Affair, bouquets and boutonnieres provided by Artistic Blossoms, ceremony music performed by Anima of Music Management, ceremony and mini-session photography provided by Angelina Rose Photography, commemorative takeaway gifts compliments of the Boston Public Library and The Catered Affair, and ceremonies officiated by Thomas A. Welch. Read more »

Boston Public Library’s February Literary Events and Black History Month Programs

Posted on February 1st, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases
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booksBoston Public Library’s February literary events and programming include lectures by authors whose works cover various genres, and the Library honors Black History Month with films, discussions, activities, story times, and more.

Author talks:

 

  • Stephen Puleo speaks about his book American Treasures: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Gettysburg Address on Wednesday, February 1, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Join Boston thriller writers Hank Phillippi Ryan and Peter Swanson for “Twists, Turns, and Double Crosses” on Thursday, February 2, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Margaret Fortier gives a lecture “Andiamo! Finding Your Italian Family” on Wednesday, February 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Therese Sellers, author of Alpha Is for Anthropos: an Ancient Greek Alphabet, will read from her book and lead participants in designing and painting medallions inspired by the beautiful illustrations on Wednesday, February 22, at 2 p.m. at the South End Branch. Located at 685 Tremont Street. Especially for children – tweens, ages 8-14.
  • Christina Baker Kline discusses Piece of the World, which explores the life of Christina Olson, a lifelong resident of Cushing, Maine, sufferer of polio, and an American icon as the subject of the Andrew Wyeth painting Christina’s World on Wednesday, February 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Join bestselling authors Eloisa James, Lauren Willig, and Sarah MacLean for a romance fiction panel to discuss their works on Tuesday, February 28, at 6:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

Black History Month programming:

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  • Passage at St. Augustine Screenings & Discussion: The award-winning documentary tells the story of those who fought the 18-month battle that led directly to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The discussions will be led by filmmaker Clennon L. King and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones.
  • Kids’ Art Club explores and responds to the contributions of artists such as the Gees Bend quilters, Faith Ringgold, and Jean Michel Basquiat on Tuesdays at 4:30 p.m. during the month of February at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street.
  • Celebrate Black History Month with stories about African Americans who have made their marks on history, music, and more on Saturday, February 4, at 11 a.m. and on Saturday, February 25 at 11 a.m. in the Central Library in Copley Square’s Children’s Library.
  • A showing of the film Selma and a discussion of how the past relates to the present takes place on Thursday, February 9, at 5 p.m. at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester.
  • Explore the BPL’s print and online resources to aid in researching African American history on Wednesday, February 15, at 2 p.m. in the Community Learning Center Classroom at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • On Tuesday, February 21, at 3 p.m., Michele Brooks leads an art workshop in which participants will make MLK Jr.-inspired peace and unity collages (for ages 5-12) at the Roslindale Branch, located at 4246 Washington Street. The same workshop takes place on Wednesday, February 22, at 11 a.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.
  • Celebrate Black History Month with Janice Allen on Tuesday, February 21, at 3:30 p.m. at the Central Library in Copley Square’s Children’s Library, located at 700 Boylston Street. Janice uses her melodic voice and percussion instruments to engage the audience in stories through song.
  • The film Men of Honor will be shown on Thursday, February 23, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. The film tells the story of Carl Brashear, the first African American U.S. Navy Diver, and the man who trained him. Part of the Never Too Late Series.
  • The Living Archive: African American Poetry, a series of panel discussions by poets and writers examining a range of topics that include the importance and significance of African American literature, takes place on Thursday, February 23, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • American storyteller and cultural lecturer Desiree Taylor gives a presentation “Dreams Deferred: Stories of Hope through an African American Lens” on Thursday, February 23, at 6:30 p.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.
  • A screening of Never Give Up: Ama’s Journey to Freedom on the Underground Railroad, followed by a discussion, takes place on Monday, February 27, at 3 p.m. for children in grades 5-10 at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street.
  • Children are invited to a jazzy story time on Tuesday, February 28, at 10:30 a.m. to celebrate the contributions of African American musicians to American culture at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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