Press Room

Boston Public Library Announces Workshop Collaboration with American Repertory Theater

Posted on December 20th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s Kirstein Business Library and Innovation Center announces its collaborative workshop series with the American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.) in conjunction with its All the City’s a Stage initiative. All workshops take place at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square:

  • Digital Advertising on a Shoestring Budget: Tuesday December 20, 2016 at 6 p.m.

Led by Grace Geller, A.R.T. Assistant Director of Marketing and Communications

Digital advertising and marketing allow companies to easily evaluate the success of different tactics and offer a more flexible approach to marketing in today’s world. However, many smaller budget companies often do not have the financial ability to invest in hiring an outside firm to implement an elaborate digital strategy. This session focuses on some of the ways smaller budget companies can benefit from the increasingly digital marketplace and begin to internalize digital advertising.

  • How It’s Made: Producing for Theater: Tuesday January 3, 2017 at 6 p.m.

Led by Mark Lunsford, A.R.T. Line Producer & Ari Barbanell, former A.R.T. Director of Special Projects and Associate Producer at OBERON

The presenters discuss the process and challenges of producing at a nonprofit theater and the opportunities for producing plays in Boston.

  • Hitting Your Mark: An Intro to Performing Arts Branding: Tuesday January 17, 2017 at 6 p.m.

Led by Joel Zayac, A.R.T. Senior Graphic Designer & Robert Duffley, A.R.T. Publications and Artistic Programs Associate

How do arts organizations develop a distinctive visual identity? How do you tell potential audiences what to expect at your show without giving away the ending? Drawing from a range of historical and contemporary examples, this seminar offers a number of different strategies for performing arts brand formation. Participants will learn what goes into creating a strong graphic identity representative of an artistic mission.

  • Public Speaking Tutorial: Strengthening Your Vocal and Physical Presentation Skills: Tuesday March 7, 2017 at 6 p.m.

Led by Erika Bailey, A.R.T. Institute Head of Voice and Speech

This workshop offers tips and tutorials for effective public speaking.

  • Fundraising for Theater: Tuesday March 21, 2017 at 6 p.m.

Led by Megan Hinckley, A.R.T. Director of Development

Discuss the process of fundraising for nonprofit theater organizations.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

The American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.) is one of the country’s most celebrated resident theaters and the winner of numerous awards including multiple Tony Awards, the Pulitzer Prize and regional Elliot Norton and I.R.N.E. Awards, and named one of the top three regional theaters in the country by Time magazine.  Under the leadership of Artistic Director Diane Paulus the A.R.T. programs its season to fulfill the theater’s mission to “expand the boundaries of theater,” broadening its focus to include the audience’s total experience and providing them with a sense of ownership in the theatrical event. The A.R.T.’s club theater OBERON, which Paulus calls a “second stage for the 21st century,” is an example of one initiative that has not only become an incubator for local artists but also has attracted national attention as a groundbreaking model for programming. Through all of its work, the A.R.T. is committed to building a community of artists, designers, technicians, administrators and audience. Critics and audiences have embraced the immersive environments that have become hallmarks of A.R.T. productions.

 

 

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Boston Public Library Announces Top Borrowed Titles of 2016

Posted on December 14th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

borrowedThe ten most frequently borrowed books from Boston Public Library locations in 2016 took patrons from a modern day train in England to early twentieth-century Boston and to many places in between. It’s not too late to read one or more of these great titles before the end of the year. Stop by and borrow one today or reserve your copy online at www.bpl.org.

 

  • All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr: Set during WWII and told from the perspectives of a young French girl and German soldier, demand for this 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction winner carried over into 2016.
  • The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins: In this suspenseful thriller, nothing is as it appears.
  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever by Jeff Kinney:  Greg Heffley may be wimpy, but demand for this series is not. The other books in the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series were also heavily borrowed in 2016.
  • Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff: The story of a seemingly-charmed marriage told from two very different perspectives.
  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates: In this memoir written for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates shares his experience with racism as a black man in America and hopes for the future.
  • My Brilliant Friend Book One: Childhood, Adolescence by Elena Ferrante: Told in a vibrant and descriptive setting, the mystery surrounding the real identity of Elena Ferrante kept this story of friendship on patron’s minds.
  • Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee: Set twenty years after To Kill a Mockingbird, this ‘lost’ early novel by Harper Lee features an adult Scout returning to Maycomb at a time of radical change.
  • Wonder by R.J. Palacio: This children’s book about a boy with a facial deformity attending school for the first time was a staple on summer reading lists throughout the city in 2016.
  • The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant: The story of a young immigrant growing up in early twentieth-century Boston.
  • Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll: A dark psychological thriller about a woman who appears to have the perfect life, but has a past full of tragedy and secrets.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library’s Festive December Programs

Posted on November 28th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases
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Celebrate the winter and holiday season at the Boston Public Library through a variety of performances, crafts, films, and open houses:

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Boston Public Library Receives Library Services and Technology Act Grant from Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners

Posted on November 10th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases
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Teen Central at Boston Public Library’s Central Library in Copley Square was awarded a Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant for $7,500 from the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners (MBLC), and is partnering with the John D. O’Bryant School of Math and Science and the South End Technology Center to develop engineering programs for 7th and 8th grade students.

The programs are offered to 300 7th and 8th graders and take place twice monthly at the South End Technology Center, Teen Central at the Central Library in Copley Square, and/or at the John D. O’Bryant School of Math and Science. Youth will work with Raspberry Pi, Scratch, Little Bits, Minecraft, and Python programming language. The grant runs from October 2016 through September 2017.

“I am excited about this grant because it networks several institutions critical to advancing student preparation and youth development – Boston Public Library, Boston Public Schools, and a powerful community-based organization in the South End Technology Center,” said Rahn Dorsey, Chief of Education for the City of Boston. “This is what learning should look like for our young people.  Learning in Boston should take full advantage of the city’s assets, should extend beyond traditional classrooms, and should incorporate technology and the modern tools needed to prepare the city’s young people for thriving futures.”

“We are grateful to the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners for this grant and are confident teens will explore engineering concepts in a supportive environment, while learning from their peers and working hands-on with tools to broaden their understanding of engineering and technology,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. Read more »

Boston Public Library Collaborates with The Brattle Theatre for Shakespeare Out of the Box

Posted on November 7th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases
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In conjunction with the initiative All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library, The Brattle Theatre and Boston Public Library present a Shakespeare Out of the Box film series running Monday, November 14 – Monday, December 19 at the Central Library in Copley Square. The Monday, December 5 showing of Titus will be followed by a Q&A with Academy-award nominated director Julie Taymor.

The series features some of the more outside of the box adaptations of the Bard’s many great works. From musicals to science fiction and from U.S. high schools to the African savannah, these selections prove that Shakespeare’s narratives are truly universal. All films screen in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Read more »