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Posts Tagged ‘Around the BPL’

Boston Public Library’s Festive December Programs

Posted on November 28th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

Celebrate the winter and holiday season at the Boston Public Library through a variety of performances, crafts, films, and open houses:

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Boston Public Library’s Homework Help Begins at Locations Across the City

Posted on November 2nd, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s free Homework Help program is underway and runs through May 25, 2017, offering free afterschool help and mentorship provided by high-achieving high school students. The program, offered Monday through Thursday from 3:30 -5:30 p.m. is open to students in grades K-8; no registration required. Boston Teacher’s Union tutors are also available during select weekdays from 4-6 p.m. for students in grades K-12. Visit www.bpl.org/homework for complete information.

“Homework Help is an essential resource offered to Boston’s youth to encourage learning in a safe, welcoming environment, and we are immensely grateful to Harvard University for their training support of the high school mentors who implement the program throughout our locations,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

Boston Public Library began collaborating with Harvard University to provide SmartTALK training to Homework Help mentors in 2014. Since its launch in 2008, SmartTALK has worked to help adequately prepare and train educators and mentors in Cambridge and Boston to help children of all ages develop strong academic and social skills outside of school hours.

“Homework help gives students the confidence they need to become critical thinkers and to develop their skills in a supportive setting, and libraries will always be a place that children can turn to for educational assistance,” said Farouqua Abuzeit, Manager of Youth Services for the Boston Public Library.

Online help is also available through LearningExpress Library, which can help students from grade school through college improve their skills by taking practice tests, completing exercises, and reading e-books. LearningExpress can also help college-bound students prepare for the ACT, SAT, and other standardized tests. Students may also search for articles and use books online with student electronic resources, and look for book, CDs, movies, and more in the BPL catalog.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library’s Summer Reading Program for All Ages Begins

Posted on June 27th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

readBoston Public Library’s annual free summer reading program (www.bpl.org/summer) begins this month, offering educational experiences for youth and adults throughout the City of Boston through August.

“We are very happy to see our summer reading program also expand to adults this year, offering everyone an opportunity to exercise their minds through reading regardless of age,” said Boston Public Library President David Leonard. “We are as always grateful to our sponsors for their commitment to our library users.”

“Summer reading offers a variety of programs and reading opportunities, giving youth a safe and fun environment in which to learn, explore, and grow during out of school time,” said Farouqua Abuzeit, Manager of Youth Services.

The children’s theme this year is “On Your Mark, Get Set…Read!” All locations throughout the system will receive visits from the Museum of Science, Historic New England, New England Aquarium, and the ReadBoston Storymobile, in addition to story times, crafts, and additional programming at locations. (more…)

Boston Public Library June Literary Events at Locations Across the City

Posted on May 24th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

Downloads3Boston Public Library offers a wealth of author talks and book sales throughout the month of June; visit www.bpl.org/calendar for a complete list.

  • The Brighton Branch, located at 40 Academy Hill Road, holds a book sale on Friday, June 3, and Saturday, June 4, from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • The Central Library, located at 700 Boylston Street, hosts a book sale in the McKim building’s Cushman Room on Saturday, June 4, from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Caldecott Medal-winning author and illustrator E.B. Lewis speaks to children about how picture books are created on Tuesday, June 7, at 4 p.m. at the Faneuil Branch, located at 419 Faneuil Street in Brighton.
  • The Parker Hill Branch hosts a book sale on Thursday, June 9, from 4-7:30 p.m. at 1497 Tremont Street in Roxbury.
  • Anthony M. Sammarco gives a slide show presentation and talk about his book Lost Boston, which details Boston’s fascinating lost architectural heritage on Thursday, June 9, at 6:30 p.m. at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street in Dorchester.
  • Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor offers profound insights in her in-depth look at the political landscape that gave birth to Black Lives Matter, discussing From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation on Saturday, June 11, at 12 p.m. and on Saturday, June 25, at 12 p.m. at the Dudley Branch, located at 65 Warren Street.
  • Local author Myra Love speaks about her new book, My Life as a Poet: Minerva’s Story, which details Minerva’s senior year in high school, in which she resists others’ efforts to define her, even when illness and violence intrude. Monday, June 13, at 6:30 p.m. at the Connolly Branch, located at 433 Centre Street in Jamaica Plain.
  • Join biologist Nathan H. Lents for a discussion of his book Not So Different: Finding Human Nature in Animals; through a mix of colorful reporting and rigorous scientific research, Lents describes the exciting strides scientists have made in decoding animal behavior. Thursday, June 16, at 6 p.m. at the East Boston Branch, located at 365 Bremen Street.
  • Local author Kenneth Turino speaks about his book Haymarket, as the Boston market district has changed dramatically but continues to serve a constant stream of students and tourists, longtime residents, and newly arrived immigrant families. Thursday, June 16, at 6:30 p.m. at the West End Branch, located at 151 Cambridge Street.
  • Stop by the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street, for a book sale on Saturday, June 18, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • The South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway, holds a book sale on Saturday, June 18, from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
  • Jenna Blum reads from her book Those Who Save Us, which combines a love story and mother-daughter drama on Tuesday, June 28, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street.
  • Bob Backlund, WWE Hall of Fame member, discusses his book Backlund: From All-American Boy to Professional Wrestling’s World Champion on Thursday, June 30, at 6 p.m. at the West End Branch, located at 151 Cambridge Street.

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Bee Panel at the Central Library in Copley Square

Posted on May 18th, 2016 by awilliams in General

BeesBees were the theme for the final Boston Public Library Author Talk of the spring, with guests Olivia Messigner Carril, co-author of The Bees in Your Backyard: A Guide to North America’s Bees, and Thomas Seeley, author of Following the Wild Bees: The Craft and Science of Bee Hunting. The bee experts provided the audience with an overview of the different ways to observe and track the wild bees that live around us.

Seeley led off with an exploration of the art of bee hunting, which involves tracking bees to their nest through a process of luring and following them. To begin, a hunter catches a bee in a box designed specifically for bee hunting that contains a sugar water comb. When the bee is released it will return with its nest mates, allowing the bee hunter to see the “beeline,” or the direction in which the bees are flying. The hunter then moves further down the beeline with the box of bees, following the bees’ path as they again are released and return to the box with the food source. Eventually, the hunter will be able to follow them home to their nest. Seeley says the joy of bee hunting lies in observing the bees and locating their home. A bee hunter doesn’t have to be immersed in nature to go on a bee hunt; Seeley has conducted bee hunts everywhere from Harvard Yard to Central Park in New York City.

Messinger Carril followed with an overview of the wide variety of bee species – four thousand in the United States and Canada alone – and how to find and identify them. The solitary bee can make its home in everything from sand to pine cones and snail shells. Some bees even build beautiful nests out of flower petals. When encountering a wild bee, she said, an observer can use a camera phone to take pictures from a few different angles in order to identify the species later. To help illustrate the wide diversity of bees, she brought along a box of bee samples that showcased a range of bee types and sizes.

The authors concluded by taking questions from the engaged audience members who were eager to know more about bee populations and species. In response to one attendee’s question on how to support wild bees, Messinger Carril emphasized that it’s important to provide them with an undisturbed place to nest and to grow native plants that are not highly cultivated.

Thank you to all who attended our spring Author Talks. Boston Public Library’s Author Talks Series will return in the fall.