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Posts Tagged ‘Center of Knowledge’

Meet Paul Cho, Special Library Assistant

Posted on November 17th, 2014 by admin in General

IMG_4568Paul Cho works with library users at the Honan-Allston Branch of the Boston Public Library. He has worked at the library for more than 25 years; working at the Charlestown Branch and the Central Library previously. His work supports the Community Gathering principle of the Compass Strategic plan through linking community members with to library programs and services within and beyond the BPL system.

Why do you enjoy working for the BPL?

All staff have the opportunity to increase their work knowledge through trainings provided. Working for the library is a very rewarding experience; I get a lot of satisfaction in helping patrons achieve their goals.

How do you assist users in using digital services?

I explain all of the options they have for using a certain service, such as the streaming media service hoopla. You don’t have to worry about expiration dates, patrons can browse music or TV shows, and hoopla is compatible  with a number of devices. I love using hoopla for music and it is very popular with users as well. I also let patrons know we have Zinio, a digital magazine service. People are surprised to know they can check out an unlimited number of magazines. We  have a lot of electronic databases that users may not know about that I also promote.

How does technology enhance library service?

It helps bring people in to the library. A lot of people in the Allston-Brighton neighborhood come in to use the computers, check out DVDs, or browse the online catalog. It’s very easy for the patron to find information in today’s world.

What is an aspect of your role that people may not know about?

I am able to assist people who speak languages other than English; I am fluent in Mandarin and Cantonese Chinese.

Meet Jazmin Idakaar, Generalist Librarian

Posted on October 31st, 2014 by admin in General

jazminJazmin, who joined the library staff in 2014, works at the Mattapan Branch of the Boston Public Library with people of all ages. Supporting the Center of Knowledge principle of the Compass Strategic plan, she works to support the technical literacy of library users through working with other staff members to facilitate technology classes at the branch.

Why do you enjoy working for the library?

I love building new connections with library users; I have some regulars who come in now and we know each other’s names. I get to know what their needs or challenges are and build upon them.

Describe your experience teaching the laptop classes.

Each seasonal session, we offer the same basic classes to help beginners build their skills - navigating the web, word processing, social media, etc. Occasionally we get a guest speaker; we recently had a cyber security class for seniors. I walk around, make sure everyone is on the same page, and dialogue and review with everyone. I get the chance to demonstrate and explain things on the fly frequently when participants bring up new questions, which is stimulating. Regardless of the challenge of the day, it is exciting to help people acquire new skills.

How do you see users interacting with technology?

Technology has become a necessity, especially with job applications. I assist people looking for jobs via the Internet and I help guide them to sites and resources that are helpful. A large number of people who come in go straight to Bing or Google and not the BPL webpage, so I like to mention at least a few services we provide directly from our own site. Users come in with e-readers and that is my opportunity to tell them about BPL services specific to devices, for example, OverDrive.

What is your favorite service offered by the BPL?

I’d have to say OverDrive; some of my favorite audiobooks are on there. It’s nice to borrow them first and then if I like them, I might buy a few.

What Type of Library User Are You?

Posted on September 17th, 2014 by admin in General

The Pew Research Center has focused some of their work on studying on the internet, technology, and libraries recently, particularly in relation to library users’ habits, engagement, and experiences. Below are just a few highlights from their research:

  • 72% of all Americans ages 16 and older have either used a public library (in person or via website) in the past 12 months or live in a household where another family member or a child is an active recent user of the library.
  • 80% of Americans under age 30 say that librarians are a “very important” resource for libraries to have.
  • Almost one in five (18%) Americans ages 16-29 have used a mobile device to visit a public library’s website or access library resources in the past 12 months, compared with 12% of those ages 30 and older.
  • 71% of city dwellers say the library is important to them and 59% have library cards — and 69% of suburban residents say the library is important and 61% have library cards.
  • Family and friends are the primary source of book discovery for Americans 16 and older, especially so for suburban (66%) and urban residents (66%). Some 60% of rural residents say they get book recommendations from family and friends. Similarly, city dwellers (25%) and suburbanites (24%) are more likely than rural residents (18%) to have received recommendations from book stores they visit. Residents of all three kinds of communities are equally likely to say librarians and library websites are sources of book recommendations.

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To see more of Pew’s research, visit pewresearch.org/topics/libraries/. To learn how to sign-up for a Boston Public Library card, visit bit.ly/BPLgetcarded. September is national library card sign-up month. Anyone who lives, works, or goes to school in Massachusetts can have a Boston Public Library card.

Boston Public Library Celebrates National Library Card Sign-up Month

Posted on August 28th, 2014 by admin in Media Releases

Cardholders gain instant access to a world of free resourcescarded

Boston Public Library celebrates Library Card Sign-up Month in September, a time when libraries across the country remind children, teens, and adults about the power of their library card.

“Our libraries are invaluable resources for community members and play a critical role in furthering the education of our residents,” said Mayor Martin J. Walsh. “I encourage Bostonians to take advantage of the free services the library system provides and sign up for a card.”

Sign up for a Boston Public Library card can be done in person at Boston Public Library locations across the city with a photo ID and proof of current residence. For immediate access to the library’s digital resources, many people start with a Boston Public Library e-card via www.bpl.org/ecard. An e-card opens the door to free e-books and audiobooks; streaming music, television, and video; digital magazines, online language learning programs, career resources, and more. (more…)

Digital Projects Manager Tom Blake Named to Library Journal’s “Movers & Shakers” List

Posted on March 17th, 2014 by admin in General

tomBoston Public Library’s Digital Projects Manager Tom Blake was recently named one of Library Journal’s 2014 ”Movers & Shakers” alongside library industry professionals for their advancement of the field and commitment to their communities.  Blake has steadily grown the library’s Digital Services department since its creation in 2005, which today includes two state-of-the-art digitization studios and a digital repository, complete with the infrastructure and collaborative partnerships necessary to optimize access to its materials. Tom’s profile can be viewed on LibraryJournal.com.

The library’s Digital Services department is responsible for digitizing and providing online access to the library’s collections. The work is done at two state-of-the-art digitization labs, using high-end digital cameras and flatbed scanners, in the Central Library in Copley Square. The digitized collections can be found under the “online collections” tab of the BPL home page. The department works to not only increase awareness of and access to collections and materials but also to partner with local communities to help share their stories.