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Posts Tagged ‘Children and Teens’

Boston Public Library’s Festive December Programs

Posted on November 28th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

Celebrate the winter and holiday season at the Boston Public Library through a variety of performances, crafts, films, and open houses:

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Boston Public Library’s Homework Help Begins at Locations Across the City

Posted on November 2nd, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s free Homework Help program is underway and runs through May 25, 2017, offering free afterschool help and mentorship provided by high-achieving high school students. The program, offered Monday through Thursday from 3:30 -5:30 p.m. is open to students in grades K-8; no registration required. Boston Teacher’s Union tutors are also available during select weekdays from 4-6 p.m. for students in grades K-12. Visit www.bpl.org/homework for complete information.

“Homework Help is an essential resource offered to Boston’s youth to encourage learning in a safe, welcoming environment, and we are immensely grateful to Harvard University for their training support of the high school mentors who implement the program throughout our locations,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

Boston Public Library began collaborating with Harvard University to provide SmartTALK training to Homework Help mentors in 2014. Since its launch in 2008, SmartTALK has worked to help adequately prepare and train educators and mentors in Cambridge and Boston to help children of all ages develop strong academic and social skills outside of school hours.

“Homework help gives students the confidence they need to become critical thinkers and to develop their skills in a supportive setting, and libraries will always be a place that children can turn to for educational assistance,” said Farouqua Abuzeit, Manager of Youth Services for the Boston Public Library.

Online help is also available through LearningExpress Library, which can help students from grade school through college improve their skills by taking practice tests, completing exercises, and reading e-books. LearningExpress can also help college-bound students prepare for the ACT, SAT, and other standardized tests. Students may also search for articles and use books online with student electronic resources, and look for book, CDs, movies, and more in the BPL catalog.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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A Tuesday in the Children’s Library

Posted on October 19th, 2015 by awilliams in General

No two days of the week are alike at the Central Library in Copley Square’s new Children’s Library. With an early literacy area ToddleTown, a StoryScape space for reading and imaginative play, an area just for tweens, and a wide range of offered programs, kids of all ages and interests are sure to find an activity to enjoy at the Children’s Library.

IMG_7430Tuesdays in the Children’s Library begin with Tinker Tots at 10:30 a.m. The program is aimed at young children and explores a STEM concept through stories and activities. The theme for the October 6 Tinker Tots is “fall.” Toddlers and their caregivers gather in the StoryScape area, where Children’s Librarian Laura Koenig reads autumn-themed picture books and leads the group in interactive seasonal songs. Participants then move to the sunny and spacious Margret and H. A. Rey Program Room to explore various fall-focused exploration stations, including a leaf-print craft, a sensory box of nature items including acorns and pine cones, and a table with magnifying glasses for examining leaves.

IMG_7433Next on the schedule is LEGO Club in the Rey Program Room at 3:30 p.m. LEGOs of all shapes, sizes, and colors are on hand to encourage young children supervised by caregivers to build, create, and interact with one another. One young girl shows Early Literacy Librarian Theresa Furbish the flying machine she made, and a little boy works on building a boat. DUPLO bricks are also available for the youngest participants.

At 5 p.m., Children’s Librarian Maggie Levine leads Tween Tuesdays, a club in which tweens (kids ages 9-13) work on projects using the technology available in Teen Central’s digital lab and participate in art- and writing-focused activities, among others. On this Tuesday, the kids continue work on a commercial promoting all the benefits of the Boston Public Library. They review the previous week’s footage and then pick which scenes they still need to shoot. They will eventually use software in Teen Central’s Lab to edit the footage together to create the final product. Club member David, age 10, says that his favorite thing about Tween Tuesdays is “doing all the cool stuff with technology.”

“With such a wide variety of programs and visitors, every day in the Children’s Library is a new adventure. The staff here loves helping children and caregivers IMG_05460explore this exciting space, choose their next great read, and enjoy our many programs. This is a special place, and it’s an honor to share it with children from Boston and beyond,” says Laura Koenig, Team Leader of Central Library Children’s Services.

In August, over 3,900 children attended programs in the Children’s Library, including story times, arts and crafts, music events, and book-themed parties. In between programs, the Children’s Library buzzes with children exploring the early literacy area’s interactive sensory wall featuring visual, auditory, and tactile panels; reading and playing in the StoryScape space; using the computers in the tween area; and browsing books, audiobooks, and DVDs to check out and take home.

For Children’s Library hours, visit http://bit.ly/1jhWCON, and find the full schedule of programs via www.bpl.org/calendar.

Mayor Walsh Celebrates Groundbreaking on Renovations to Jamaica Plain Branch of the Boston Public Library

Posted on September 25th, 2015 by rlavery in Media Releases

Today Mayor Martin J. Walsh, the Boston Public Library and its Board of Trustees, the City of Boston’s Property and Construction Management Department, and the Jamaica Plain community, celebrated a groundbreaking for a major renovation project for the Jamaica Plain Branch of the Boston Public Library located at 12 Sedgwick Street. The renovations to the building, constructed in 1911, will provide more than a 20% increase in space for the community to read, browse the book collection, access computers, attend and host meetings, and participate in programming.

“Libraries are at the heart of every Boston neighborhood, and the Jamaica Plain community is passionate about their community,” said Mayor Walsh. “This investment in the Jamaica Plain Branch of the Boston Public Library will provide new opportunities for learning to children, teens, and adults, and serve as a meeting place for neighbors.”

“Investing in our neighborhood libraries, and expanding learning and opportunity to all corners of the City, is core to the Boston Public Library’s mission,” said John Hailer, Interim Chair of the Boston Public Library Board of Trustees. “Thank you to Mayor Walsh for making this commitment to the Jamaica Plain Branch, and I look forward to gathering here again for the ribbon cutting.”

“The JP community has been advocating for these renovations for many years. Thanks to a great collaboration between neighbors, City Hall, and the BPL, this project is moving forward, and the new features of the Jamaica Plain Branch will be truly reflective of the needs of this diverse community,” said David Leonard, Interim President of the Boston Public Library.

The $10 million renovation includes: a 700-square foot addition facing South Street that will serve as a community reading lounge; a terrace along Sedgwick street where residents can read and mingle; multiple meeting spaces; improved and more flexible space for children, teens and adults; and a refreshed collection of 30,000 books. Technology improvements include 15 new desktop and 20 laptop computers, free WiFi, additional self-checkout stations, and a creative suite of software in the new digital maker-space. Other features include an elevator for full ADA accessibility to all levels, new and more efficient mechanical systems, parking for over 20 bikes, and new exterior landscaping.

To determine priorities in the building redesign, the Boston Public Library, the City of Boston’s Property and Construction Management team, and Utile, Inc. Architecture & Planning, the design firm for the project, collaborated closely with the Friends of the Jamaica Plain Branch Library and the community at-large. The general contractor for the project is Colantonio, Inc.

The Jamaica Plain Branch of the BPL will be closed throughout the renovation and is anticipated to re-open in spring 2017. During the construction Jamaica Plain residents are encouraged to use the nearby Connolly Branch of the BPL located at 433 Centre St, and the Egleston Square Branch of the BPL, located at 2044 Columbus Avenue.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

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Central Library Renovation Profiles: Angie Ortiz, Teen Central’s 2015 Summer Intern

Posted on August 26th, 2015 by awilliams in General

IMG_6614Angie Ortiz, 18, is a recent graduate of Boston Arts Academy. This summer she worked as Teen Central’s Boston Youth Fund Summer Intern. Here, she reflects on her experience.

What was your role at Teen Central?

As Teen Central’s BYF Summer Intern, I assisted with classes in the digital lab. I really liked to help with animation and iMovie programs and to show teens how to make storybooks for animation or trailers. It was cool for me to see them apply what they learned into something that they enjoyed making. I also assisted with shelving and pulling books, and I blogged about video games. I also helped with expanding our technology and media lounge. For instance, I had teens vote on what games they’d like to see added to our game collection.

IMG_05460How long have you been visiting Teen Central?

I’ve been coming to the Boston Public Library for a long time with my mom.* I’d hang out in the Teen Room before it was renovated. When I got a little older, I stopped coming, but when I heard about the renovations I had to come back to see what it was like. I thought Teen Central was so cool, and I wanted to work there. I was president and founder of my high school’s gamers club, and when I saw all the awesome resources in Teen Central’s Lounge, I brought the club there for our meetings. They really liked it, and a lot of the kids started hanging out in Teen Central on their own.

When you weren’t working, what did you like to do in Teen Central?

I liked to hang out in the Lounge, but I also liked to use the programs in the Lab. I used Photoshop to illustrate, paint, and animate GIFs. I met with friends here, and we played board games and card games. I also checked out books here.

How does this renovation benefit you and other teens?

It’s a friendly, expansive space that is welcoming to teenagers. It’s a safe space. The librarians are very helpful, and always have been. One of my favorite parts of the renovation is the addition of technology. That’s a big deal, as most occupations now require computer knowledge. There are still some teens who don’t know how to use computers, and a library is a great space for them to learn how to do that.

IMG_005536What are your plans now that you’ve graduated high school?

I’ll be attending Lesley University on a full scholarship to study animation in the fall. I want to go into game animation. There’s a huge gap of women in the video game industry, and I want to create more female protagonists and stronger representation for women in games.

What books would you recommend to other teens?

The Blood of Olympus by Rick Riordan. It’s part of the Heroes of Olympus series, a sequel to the Percy Jackson novels that I read when I was young. The books are about a boy who doesn’t fit in at school but found a place where he belonged and was a hero. I was having a hard time at school, and the Percy Jackson books inspired me to go to Boston Arts Academy, where I founded the gamers club and made a lot of friends. The main characters are funny, regular teens, too.

*Angie’s mom is BPL Board of Trustees Vice Chair Evelyn Arana-Ortiz.