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Boston Public Library’s March Author Talks and Shakespeare Commemorative Programs

Posted on March 1st, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

marchBoston Public Library’s March author talks and programs include celebrations of poetry, Women’s History Month, Shakespeare, new works, and more:

  • Joseph Luzzi’s lecture “From Twain to Toni Morrison: A Literary Journey through America” leads participants through the fascinating world of American literature, revealing the character and conflicts of the American spirit on Thursday, March 2, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Ellen B. Alden discusses her work Your Faithfully, Florence Burke, the story of her great-great-grandfather’s struggle as an Irish immigrant in America, on Saturday, March 11, at 12 p.m. at the Fields Corner Branch, located at 1520 Dorchester Avenue, and on Monday, March 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street in Dorchester.
  • Stephen Kinzer reads from his new book True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire on Tuesday, March 14, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes Series.
  • In celebration of Women’s History Month, author and historian Kate Clifford Larson discusses the lives of Harriet Tubman, Mary Surratt, and Rosemary Kennedy, the subjects of her critically-acclaimed biographies on Thursday, March 16, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The Friends of the South Boston Branch hold a book sale on Saturday, March 18, at 10 a.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.
  • Stephen Kurkjian shares passages from Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled off the World’s Greatest Art Heist on Monday, March 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the East Boston Branch, located at 365 Bremen Street.
  • Reginald Dwayne Betts reads from his two critically-acclaimed collections of poetry, Shahid Reads His Own Palm and Bastards of the Reagan Era, discusses the power of language, and examines the important intersection of art and social justice on Wednesday, March 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Noam Maggor, author of Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age, discusses his work on Tuesday, March 28, at 6:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Gish Jen reads from her new book Girl at the Baggage Claim: Explaining the East-West Culture Gap on Tuesday, March 28, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes series.

All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library commemorates the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death. From September 2016 to June 2017, discover the Bard’s lasting legacy with dozens of programs system wide connecting audiences to theater and the dramatic arts.

March Shakespeare programs:

  • Shakespeare to Hip Hop: Hip hop poet and actor Marlon Carey and slam poetry champion and educator Regie Gibson team up with musicians to create an energetic literary performance combining poetry, spoken word, story, song, and rap on Friday, March 3, at 12 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Nicole Galland celebrates Shakespeare in her part lecture, part performance “The Play’s the Thing: Shakespeare on Stage” on Monday, March 6, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lectures Series.
  • Erika Bailey, American Repertory Theater Institute Head of Voice and Speech, offers tips and tutorials for effective public speaking on Tuesday, March 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Tour the Library’s Shakespeare Unauthorized exhibition with Curator Jay Moschella on Thursday, March 9, at 2 p.m. and on Thursday, March 23, at 2 p.m. in the McKim Exhibition Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. The exhibition is on view through March 31.
  • Visit the Children’s Library for activity stations that celebrate Shakespeare’s work on Saturday, March 11, at 3 p.m. in the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Marlon Carey and Regie Gibson perform Shakespeare’s sonnets and soliloquies for all ages on Tuesday, March 14, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Children make various styles of masks over the course of a three-week workshop with Boston Puppeteers Cooperative for ages 6 and older beginning Thursday, March 16, at 3:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Megan Hinckley, American Repertory Theater Director of Development, discusses the process of fundraising for nonprofit theater organizations on Tuesday, March 21, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Gnomeo and Juliet will be shown on Sunday, March 26, at 2 p.m.in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Seven Times Salt performs “Easy as Lying: Music of Shakespeare’s” on Sunday, March 26, at 2:30 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Children ages 8 and older discuss Unstoppable Octobia May on Friday, March 31, at 3:30 p.m. in the Children’s Library at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library’s February Literary Events and Black History Month Programs

Posted on February 1st, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

booksBoston Public Library’s February literary events and programming include lectures by authors whose works cover various genres, and the Library honors Black History Month with films, discussions, activities, story times, and more.

Author talks:

 

  • Stephen Puleo speaks about his book American Treasures: The Secret Efforts to Save the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Gettysburg Address on Wednesday, February 1, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Join Boston thriller writers Hank Phillippi Ryan and Peter Swanson for “Twists, Turns, and Double Crosses” on Thursday, February 2, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Margaret Fortier gives a lecture “Andiamo! Finding Your Italian Family” on Wednesday, February 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Therese Sellers, author of Alpha Is for Anthropos: an Ancient Greek Alphabet, will read from her book and lead participants in designing and painting medallions inspired by the beautiful illustrations on Wednesday, February 22, at 2 p.m. at the South End Branch. Located at 685 Tremont Street. Especially for children – tweens, ages 8-14.
  • Christina Baker Kline discusses Piece of the World, which explores the life of Christina Olson, a lifelong resident of Cushing, Maine, sufferer of polio, and an American icon as the subject of the Andrew Wyeth painting Christina’s World on Wednesday, February 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Join bestselling authors Eloisa James, Lauren Willig, and Sarah MacLean for a romance fiction panel to discuss their works on Tuesday, February 28, at 6:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

Black History Month programming:

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  • Passage at St. Augustine Screenings & Discussion: The award-winning documentary tells the story of those who fought the 18-month battle that led directly to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The discussions will be led by filmmaker Clennon L. King and Civil Rights veteran Mimi Jones.
  • Kids’ Art Club explores and responds to the contributions of artists such as the Gees Bend quilters, Faith Ringgold, and Jean Michel Basquiat on Tuesdays at 4:30 p.m. during the month of February at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street.
  • Celebrate Black History Month with stories about African Americans who have made their marks on history, music, and more on Saturday, February 4, at 11 a.m. and on Saturday, February 25 at 11 a.m. in the Central Library in Copley Square’s Children’s Library.
  • A showing of the film Selma and a discussion of how the past relates to the present takes place on Thursday, February 9, at 5 p.m. at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester.
  • Explore the BPL’s print and online resources to aid in researching African American history on Wednesday, February 15, at 2 p.m. in the Community Learning Center Classroom at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • On Tuesday, February 21, at 3 p.m., Michele Brooks leads an art workshop in which participants will make MLK Jr.-inspired peace and unity collages (for ages 5-12) at the Roslindale Branch, located at 4246 Washington Street. The same workshop takes place on Wednesday, February 22, at 11 a.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.
  • Celebrate Black History Month with Janice Allen on Tuesday, February 21, at 3:30 p.m. at the Central Library in Copley Square’s Children’s Library, located at 700 Boylston Street. Janice uses her melodic voice and percussion instruments to engage the audience in stories through song.
  • The film Men of Honor will be shown on Thursday, February 23, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. The film tells the story of Carl Brashear, the first African American U.S. Navy Diver, and the man who trained him. Part of the Never Too Late Series.
  • The Living Archive: African American Poetry, a series of panel discussions by poets and writers examining a range of topics that include the importance and significance of African American literature, takes place on Thursday, February 23, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • American storyteller and cultural lecturer Desiree Taylor gives a presentation “Dreams Deferred: Stories of Hope through an African American Lens” on Thursday, February 23, at 6:30 p.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.
  • A screening of Never Give Up: Ama’s Journey to Freedom on the Underground Railroad, followed by a discussion, takes place on Monday, February 27, at 3 p.m. for children in grades 5-10 at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street.
  • Children are invited to a jazzy story time on Tuesday, February 28, at 10:30 a.m. to celebrate the contributions of African American musicians to American culture at the Lower Mills Branch, located at 27 Richmond Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library’s November Author Talks and Shakespeare Programs

Posted on October 26th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

downloads14-001Boston Public Library’s November author talks and literary events feature a variety of topics, including the history of dining in Boston, Shakespeare & cocktails, and improving reading in children. The Shakespeare initiative “All the City’s A Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library” continues this month with programs available across the system.

  • Justin Goodstein explores the history of Haymarket, from its beginnings as an expansion of Quincy Market in the first half of the nineteenth century to its current incarnation as a host of an ever-changing and diverse population on Wednesday, November 2, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square.
  • Hundred Year Retroactive Book Award of 1916: Three bestselling books of 1916; Robert Frost’s Mountain Interval, Albert Einstein’s Relativity, and Margaret Sanger’s What Every Girl Should Know, will be defended by Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky, MIT professor Alan Lightman, and WGBH’s Margery Eagan. Author Stona Fitch will moderate the debate on Thursday, November 3, at 6:30 p.m. in the Abbey Room at the Central Library in Copley Square. Presented by the Associates of the Boston Public Library.
  • City of Boston Poet Laureate Danielle Legros Georges visits the South Boston Branch at 646 East Broadway on Saturday, November 5, from 2-4 p.m. to meet with aspiring poets and provide feedback on their works.
  • Reading Specialist Lorna Kaufman, Ph.D. will discuss her book Smart Kid, Can’t Read, which reveals the five steps to help improve children’s reading ability on Tuesday, November 8, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street.
  • Jenna Russell, coauthor of Long Mile Home, an account of the Boston Marathon bombing, talks about her book and her work as a Spotlight investigative reporter for The Boston Globe on Saturday, November 12, at 2 p.m. at the Brighton Branch, located at 40 Academy Hill Road in Brighton.
  • James C. O’Connell reveals a unique history of dining in Boston, sharing stories of the most-beloved Boston restaurants of yesterday and today as he discusses Dining out in Boston: A Culinary History on Wednesday, November 16, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square.
  • Caroline Bicks and Michelle Ephraim, established Shakespeare professors and humor writers, discuss their irreverent cocktail book Shakespeare, Not Stirred: Cocktails for Your Everyday Dramas that adds a Shakespearean twist to life’s everyday highs and lows on Thursday, November 17, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square.
  • The Friends of the South Boston Branch hold their final book sale of the fall season on Saturday, November 19, from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.

(more…)

Boston Public Library’s Local and Family History Series

Posted on September 28th, 2016 by rlavery in Media Releases

collage-9-28Boston Public Library’s fall Local & Family History Series continues, offering a wide range of topics from the Gilded Age and researching ancestors’ artifacts to today’s notable restaurants and the history of Haymarket:

 

  • Stephen T. Moskey, author of Larz and Isabel Anderson: Wealth and Celebrity in the Gilded Age explores the intersection of wealth, celebrity, politics, gender, and race on Wednesday, September 28, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Pamela Holland helps attendees find the stories of their ancestors and locate sources such as newspapers, diaries, letters, digitized books, photographs, and ephemera, many of which are now freely available online, to incorporate into colorful narratives of their ancestors’ lives. Wednesday, October 12, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Lindsay Fulton discusses the tabulation of the federal censuses from 1790-1840, the records that survive, and the questions that were asked during each enumeration on Wednesday, October 19, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The BPL’s own Justin Goodstein explores the history of Haymarket, from its beginnings as an expansion of Quincy Market in the first half of the nineteenth century to its current incarnation as a host of an ever-changing and diverse population. Wednesday, November 2, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • James C. O’Connell shares stories of the most-beloved Boston restaurants of yesterday and today—illustrated with an extensive collection of historic menus, postcards, and photos, discussing Dining out in Boston: A Culinary History on Wednesday, November 16, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • David A. Lambert helps attendees research World War I and World War II veterans through exploring how key resources such as family ephemera related to the service of the veteran, including dog tags, personal letters, or discharge papers, can give clues to the unit or the vessel to which their relative was attached. This Local & Family History Series lecture is presented on the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Wednesday, December 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Karin Tanabe Discusses “The Gilded Years” at BPL

Posted on September 16th, 2016 by rlavery in General

img_1869The Gilded Years author Karin Tanabe visited the Central Library on Thursday, September 15 to discuss her historical fiction work, which tells the story of Anita Hemmings, the first black woman to attend and graduate Vassar College by passing as a white woman in the late 1890s. Anita has local ties – she grew up in Roxbury and worked at the Boston Public Library as a cataloguer, and likely met her husband at the BPL. Tanabe is a Vassar alumna and first got the idea for the book in 2014, when she flipped through her alumni magazine and saw mention of Anita. She began researching the woman and quickly found that not too much information could be found, but the subject of her next book was quickly brewing in her head.

Tanabe and some of her friends visited Vassar to search through their archives to find correspondence and details about Anita Hemmings. She was active in school, a member of the debate club and choir, and a very intelligent woman. Though no “majors” existed at Vassar at the time, Anita focused on languages and wanted to be a teacher. The year after she graduated, her college roommate of two years leaked the news that she was an African-American woman after her suspicions were raised in their senior year. After college, Anita married and lived with her husband in Tennessee before relocated to New York City. Anita did not pursue a teaching career after marrying and having children.

A question and answer period followed the reading of a passage. Audience members were curious to know if Anita was related to Peter or Sally Hemmings (maybe), and if Tanabe had communicated with any of Anita’s ancestors; Tanabe has been in touch with Anita’s great granddaughter. Listeners also asked if Anita was involved in civil rights issues, and Tanabe said she was not, to her knowledge, but Anita had a best friend who went to Wellesley College who was. One of the most challenging aspects of writing this book, Tanabe said, was tracking down the name of Anita’s roommate; she wrote most of the book without knowing. Tanabe also discussed how the book has relevance today, as racial tensions and acceptance of others is still an issue more than 100 years later.

Tanabe concluded the talk by signing books and showing photographs of Anita and others related to The Gilded Years.

The next Author Talk is Tuesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, featuring Stacy Schiff, author of The Witches: Salem, 1692.