Boston Public Library
Programs and Events

Author Talk Series at the Central Library

Boston Public Library author talks feature a wide range of talented writers. Hear authors read from their books, purchase a copy, get it signed, and learn about the creative process that gets such magnificent stories told. To look for even more author talks taking place Boston Public Library locations, please use our calendar of events.

Subscribe to our syndicated feed or our Facebook group:syndicated feedfacebook logo

Jump to: April | May | June


 
Wednesday
April 16
6:00 p.m.

Central Library

Commonwealth Salon

700 Boylston Street
Author Talk with Robert Wicks, author of Perspective: The Calm Within the Storm

Perspective: The Calm Within the StormIn Perspective, Robert J. Wicks combines research and classic wisdom to provide advice on how to discover and regain a balanced and healthy perspective. As Wicks explains, how we see the world and ourselves is more important than what we see. Our perspectives are what matter. Classic wisdom literature has emphasized this for generations and clinical psychology has followed suit from its inception. Wicks received his doctorate in psychology from Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital and is on the faculty of Loyola University, Maryland. He has published over 50 books for professionals and the general public including Bounce: Living the Resilient Life, Riding the Dragon, and Streams of Contentment.


 
Thursday
April 17
6:00 p.m.

Central Library

Rabb Lecture Hall

700 Boylston Street
Author Panel featuring Boston Globe reporters Scott Helman & Jenna Russell, authors of Long Mile Home: Boston Under Attack, the City’s Courageous Recovery, and the Epic Hunt for Justice

Long Mile Home: Boston Under Attack, the City’s Courageous Recovery, and the Epic Hunt for JusticeLong Mile Home tells the gripping story of the tragic, surreal, and ultimately inspiring week of April 15, 2013, and highlights the bravery, resourcefulness, and resiliency of the Boston community before, during, and after the tragicLong Mile Home: Boston Under Attack, the City’s Courageous Recovery, and the Epic Hunt for Justice Marathon Bombings. The authors, both journalists at the Boston Globe, are backed by that paper’s deep and widely praised coverage of the event. Through the eyes of seven principal characters, Helman and Russell trace the distinct paths that brought them together. With an unprecedented level of detail and insight, the book offers revelations, insights, and powerful stories of heroism and humanity.

Deborah Becker This talk will be moderated by Deborah Becker, a reporter and host at WBUR. Her reporting focuses on mental health, criminal justice, crime and education. She was a key part of WBUR's coverage of the Marathon bombings and their aftermath.
 
 
 
 


 
Thursday
May 8
6:00 p.m.

Central Library

Commonwealth Salon

700 Boylston Street
Author Talk with Hiawatha Bray, author of You Are Here: From the Compass to GPS, the History and Future of How We Find Ourselves

Hiawatha BrayYou Are Here examines the rise of our technologically aided era of navigational omniscience —or how we came to know exactly where we are at all times. Filled with tales of scientists and astronauts, inventors and entrepreneurs, You Are Here tells the story of how humankind solved one of its oldest and toughest problems, only to herald a new era in which it’s impossible to hide. Hiawatha Bray is a technology reporter for the Boston Globe, where he has been on staff since 1995. He has also written for Wired, Black Enterprise, Fast Company, and Christianity Today.


 
Wednesday
June 11
5:30 p.m.

Central Library

Orientation Room

700 Boylston Street
Author Talk with Joel Kovarsky, author of The True Geography of Our Country: Jefferson’s Cartographic Vision

True Geography of Our CountryThomas Jefferson lived at a time when geography was considered the "mother of all sciences." Although he published only a single printed map, Jefferson's interest in and use of geographic and cartographic materials spanned his many careers—attorney, farmer, surveyor, and politician—and continued in his twilight years at Monticello. He understood maps not only as valuable for planning but as essential for future land claims and development, exploration and navigation, and continental commercial enterprise. Joel Kovarsky has taught courses on the history of cartography for the University of Virginia's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and is the owner of The Prime Meridian: Antique Maps & Books. Presented by the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library.


 
Thursday
June 12
6:00 p.m.

Central Library

Commonwealth Salon

700 Boylston Street
Author Talk with Sharon Louden, editor of Living and Sustaining a Creative Life: Essays by 40 Working Artists

Sharon LoudenIn Living and Sustaining a Creative Life, artist Sharon Louden gathers the moving, personal stories of forty fellow artists who are trying to sustain a creative practice in a society where it is not always easy. From frank accounts of struggles to the unexpected challenges of commercial success, Louden shows the reality of how artists juggle their creative lives with the everyday business of making a living. Sharon Louden received a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a MFA from the Yale University School of Art. Her work has been exhibited in numerous museums and galleries worldwide and is in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. She currently teaches at the New York Academy of Art in New York City.


 
Thursday
June 26
6:00 p.m.

Central Library

Abbey Room

700 Boylston Street
Author Talk with Louisa Lim, author of The People’s Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited

Louisa LimOn June 4, 1989, the People's Liberation Army opened fire on unarmed civilians in Beijing, China, killing untold hundreds of people. A quarter century later, this defining event remains buried in China's modern history. In The People's Republic of Amnesia, Louisa Lim charts how the events of June 4 changed China and how China changed the events of June 4 by rewriting its history. Louisa Lim has reported from China for the past decade, most recently as NPR's Beijing correspondent, and has been honored in the Human Rights Press Awards. She graduated from Leeds University in England with a degree in Modern Chinese Studies. She began her journalistic career in Hong Kong and was later appointed as the BBC's Beijing correspondent. She is currently a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan.