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Zombie Awareness Month

Posted on May 5th, 2015 by Anna in Books, Resources
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Viewing that May is Zombie Awareness Month, I thought it would be beneficial for everyone if I went over what to do should the apocalypse actually happen. According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), families should always be prepared for a Zombie Apocalypse, just as they would be prepared for natural disasters. Here are three things you need to do:


1. Always have an emergency kit ready to go on a moment’s notice:

This should include, but is not limited to, the following:

-Water (1 gallon per person per day)

-Food (non-perishables like canned goods)

-Can opener (not the electric variety!)

-Medications (for all people and pets, if needed)

-Change of clothes and a blanket for each person

-Important documents (such as birth certificates and drivers licences)

-First aid kit (Nothing can heal you from a Zombie bite, obviously, but you’ll want this for every other cut and scrape that might happen during your escape.)

-Battery powered radio

-Supplies for your pets including food and water


-Cellphone with charger

-Extra batteries

-Extra cash (During an apocalypse we must assume that there will be a power outage, in which case, ATMs and cash registers might not take your credit or debit cards. Always have backup cash on hand!)

-And if you don’t need it, don’t take it! (Remember, there may be a time when you’ll have to be running on foot and you’ve already got enough to carry.)


2. Work with your family and/or your friends on an emergency plan:

-Identify what types of disasters, aside from Zombies, could happen where you are (This includes things like hurricanes and flooding.)

-If you get separated, know where to meet up (for this, you’ll want to know your disasters. If flooding is a possibility, you clearly won’t meet up on the beach!)

-Know the best way to escape your area, and then map out several other options in case the first is blocked by Zombies or a downed tree across the road.

-Give everyone in your group a list of emergency contacts from other family members or friends to the fire department and police.


3. Read these terrifyingly good books found at the Boston Public Library: 

(There’s something for everyone on this list!)



Zombies Vs. Unicorns





















pride and prejudice and zombies

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies










is this a zombie

Is This A Zombie?










zombies dr

Zombies: A Record of the Year of Infection : Field Notes by Dr. Robert Twombly










marvel zombies

Marvel Zombies










zombies don't cry

Zombies Don’t Cry










zombie survival guide

The Zombie Survival Guide










alice in zombieland

Alice in Zombieland











Bitterblue – A Review

Posted on April 28th, 2015 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff
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Title/Author: Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore

Read by: Anna, Teen Central Librarian

Summary: Bitterblue first appeared in Kristin Cashore’s Graceling as a young princess running from her father, the king. She was ten years old then. Now she’s 18 and struggling as Queen to understand exactly what happened during her father’s reign and how it’s still affecting her people. During her search for the truth, she befriends a thief and realizes that King Leck used his grace to do the most unspeakable things to his subjects.

Series/Standalone: Book 3 in the Graceling trilogy

Genre/sub-genre: Fantasy

Diversity: yes (In reading Bitterblue, I’ve come to realize there is more diversity in the previous books than I originally thought, but they aren’t for the reader to know about, until book 3.)

Relatable characters: yes

Would I re-read?: Maybe-yes

Personal thoughts: This was a very difficult book to read, as much as it was very good. Bitterblue faces many obstacles in her search for the truth, and many of those obstacles bring her down, making her doubt herself. This was hard to read, but also finding out exactly why King Leck hired his healers as his main advisers was also difficult. I won’t sugar coat it, this book is dark, and a lot longer than the other two. However, that said, it does a nice job of ending the trilogy and wrapping up all the important bits, while leaving enough open to be realistic. I highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys fantasy with a lot of realism thrown in.

Fire – A Review

Posted on April 1st, 2015 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff
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Title/Author: Fire by Kristin Cashore

Read by: Anna, Teen Central Librarian

Summary: Fire is the last monster human alive, with the ability to read minds. When spies start appearing in the Dells with foggy brains, the king pleads with her to help with the interrogations, to figure out who means well and who doesn’t. But she doesn’t want to hurt anyone the way her father did and she considers interrogation almost inhumane. And yet, if she doesn’t help the king, war will break out and the kingdom could be lost.

Series/Standalone: Book 2 in the Graceling trilogy, but can be read as a standalone

Genre/sub-genre: Fantasy

Diversity: There are characters with mobility issues

Relatable characters: yes

Would I re-read?: Maybe

Personal thoughts: I enjoyed reading this, though I think I enjoyed the first book, Graceling, even more. Again, there is a romance in this story, but it doesn’t take over the story, and it doesn’t have the traditional ending most romances have, which I appreciated. The main character is strong, but also has weaknesses, which was also appreciated. She was realistic in that way.  There is one more book in this trilogy, Bitterblue, which I am intending to read next!

Graceling – A Review

Posted on March 25th, 2015 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff
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Title/Author: Graceling by Kristin Cashore

Read by: Anna, a Teen Central Librarian

Summary: Katsa is a Graceling, graced with the extreme skill to kill. Her uncle, the king, has been using her to keep control over his lands since she was a young girl. But then she meets Prince Po and finds a friend where she never expected to find one. With Po, she’ll work to break free from the bindings the king has placed on her and head off on a wild adventure that will teach her more about herself than even she knew was possible, all while keeping friends and family safe from unknown dangers.

Series/Standalone: Book 1 in the Graceling trilogy (but can also be read as a standalone)

Genre/sub-genre: Fantasy

Diversity: Characters are diverse in the fact that a select few are different than the rest, some have disabilities as well, though skin colors don’t play a factor, eye colors do.

Relatable characters: Yes

Would I re-read?: Yes

Personal thoughts: I loved the cover. I loved the fact that Katsa was a strong girl in mind and body, who didn’t lack emotions, who knew what she didn’t want in life and was strong enough to stick to that all the way through the book. Yes, there is a bit of romance here, but it’s never overwhelming, and the couple are friends first and foremost. The story was brilliant. Even I didn’t see how the puzzle pieces fit together until the very end. The world building was fantastic, and all of the characters were well rounded. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves fantasy.

The Recruit – A Review

Posted on March 20th, 2015 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff
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The Recruit


Title/Author: The Recruit by Robert Muchamore

Read by: Anna, Teen Librarian at Teen Central

Summary: A young boy finds a way out of his rough life after his mother dies, when he is given the opportunity to train as a spy for the British government.

Series/Standalone: Book one out of twelve.

Genre/sub-genre: Mystery/Thriller/Espionage

Diversity: Some of the more minor characters came from different backgrounds.

Relatable characters: Yes, though some of the characters seemed a lot older than their stated ages.

Would I re-read?: Perhaps, though I am really looking forward to reading the rest of this series.

Personal thoughts: This was a very fast read for me, as I couldn’t put it down. It was also something that I wish had been around when I was a teen because I know I would have loved it back then too. The characters were great, and James’ first mission was interesting because it did leave him with a lot of questions about the validity of what the government was doing versus what common civilians were trying to do, and what large companies sometimes get up to. If you enjoy reading about spies, I encourage you to pick up this book, you’ll be glad you did!