Teens

Category Archives: Resources

Reading Backwards, Watching in Japanese: Mob Psycho 100, the Manga!

Posted on October 11th, 2016 by jkenney in Books, Resources, Reviews - Staff, Technology, Teen Services

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Happy Fall Otaku! I hope you all got to see Mob Psycho 100 on a streaming site. The first season is now over! So that was fast, but it did actually start in July. At this point I wondered, “what about the manga?” Well it doesn’t seem to be widely available  in the US. I won’t be able to order copies for the BPL, but it is online! Go and read on MangaFreak here. Unfortunately, it doesn’t actually read right to left (kuso!) but the browser is pretty nice. Go ahead and pop out the larger version. You can also find it here on MangaReader, but be wary of non-teen ads. It does work with AdBlock so you can try that too.

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Looking at the manga, you can see the basic art style in the story panels. Drawing is simplified line work with some more advanced light and shadow. More detail is given to the creepy spirit characters and psychic power effects.

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The online manga sites scan entire and partial softcover foldouts as you can see here below:


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So there you have it. The complete run of the manga is available on these online sties. The browsers work well and have high quality scans. The thumbnails were a little blurry for this post but don’t let that disappoint you. Click the images for full resolution. Go online and read Mob Psycho 100 backwards. The pages may flip left to right but the panels on each page are still right to left. Enjoy!

 

john250-150x150Did you know that in addition to physical books and DVDs, your library card gives you access to anime and graphic novels online? The BPL subscribes toHoopla, a streaming service that allows you to check out and enjoy the media you love on your computer, tablet or smartphone. You can learn more about the BPL’s digital media collections here.

Want company while you’re watching anime? The Hyde Park Teen Anime Club meets on Thursdays at 2:30 p.m.

*”Reading Backwards, Watching in Japanese” features reviews of anime and manga by John, the Teen Librarian at the Hyde Park Branch, on the second Tuesday of every month.

Zombie Awareness Month

Posted on May 5th, 2015 by Anna in Books, Resources
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Zombie-Awareness-Month

Viewing that May is Zombie Awareness Month, I thought it would be beneficial for everyone if I went over what to do should the apocalypse actually happen. According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), families should always be prepared for a Zombie Apocalypse, just as they would be prepared for natural disasters. Here are three things you need to do:

 

1. Always have an emergency kit ready to go on a moment’s notice:

This should include, but is not limited to, the following:

-Water (1 gallon per person per day)

-Food (non-perishables like canned goods)

-Can opener (not the electric variety!)

-Medications (for all people and pets, if needed)

-Change of clothes and a blanket for each person

-Important documents (such as birth certificates and drivers licences)

-First aid kit (Nothing can heal you from a Zombie bite, obviously, but you’ll want this for every other cut and scrape that might happen during your escape.)

-Battery powered radio

-Supplies for your pets including food and water

-Flashlight

-Cellphone with charger

-Extra batteries

-Extra cash (During an apocalypse we must assume that there will be a power outage, in which case, ATMs and cash registers might not take your credit or debit cards. Always have backup cash on hand!)

-And if you don’t need it, don’t take it! (Remember, there may be a time when you’ll have to be running on foot and you’ve already got enough to carry.)

 

2. Work with your family and/or your friends on an emergency plan:

-Identify what types of disasters, aside from Zombies, could happen where you are (This includes things like hurricanes and flooding.)

-If you get separated, know where to meet up (for this, you’ll want to know your disasters. If flooding is a possibility, you clearly won’t meet up on the beach!)

-Know the best way to escape your area, and then map out several other options in case the first is blocked by Zombies or a downed tree across the road.

-Give everyone in your group a list of emergency contacts from other family members or friends to the fire department and police.

 

3. Read these terrifyingly good books found at the Boston Public Library: 

(There’s something for everyone on this list!)

 

zombiesvsunicorns

Zombies Vs. Unicorns

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Zom-B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pride and prejudice and zombies

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

is this a zombie

Is This A Zombie?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

zombies dr

Zombies: A Record of the Year of Infection : Field Notes by Dr. Robert Twombly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

marvel zombies

Marvel Zombies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

zombies don't cry

Zombies Don’t Cry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

zombie survival guide

The Zombie Survival Guide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

alice in zombieland

Alice in Zombieland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grave of the Fireflies

Posted on January 27th, 2015 by jkenney in Movies, Resources, Reviews - Staff, Reviews - Teens, Teen Services

grave of the fireflies

This older Studio Ghibli film dates from 1988. Grave of the Fireflies, is a tragedy about a young sister and brother and their struggle to survive the fire-bombings of Japan during the Second World War. It is a moving study of humanity’s strengths and weaknesses. Who is your enemy? Who is your family, friend or neighbor? While their father is out at sea with the Japanese navy, their family is further fragmented in a fire-bombing raid. The children seek shelter with extended family but encounter callousness, neglect and exploitation. Some total strangers show more compassion than their own families and the older brother struggles to care for his sister and keep them all alive. The story of these children teaches us all about the horrors of war, and both the angels and demons of human nature. I imagine the title makes reference to the short life and light of fireflies. The artwork shows its age in the rendering style compared to more modern works, but expressions and animation are still top quality Ghibli. The voice acting in the English dub that I saw on Netflix was adequate, but I prefer to listen to the Japanese and read subtitles. This can be challenging during rapid dialog. Audiences should be ready for heartbreak when watching this film. It may be interesting to compare it with The Wind Rises, about the designer of the famous Zero fighter plane. But that recent film deals more with life before the war and Japan’s notable achievement in aeronautics. To me, the most powerful part of Grave of the Fireflies comes at its most cruel moment, when so-called “friends” stoop to staggering depths of avarice and disrespect. Grave of the Fireflies is a great film, but one to be watched with care.

Coming soon to the BPL DVD collection:

Posted on January 21st, 2015 by jkenney in Movies, Resources, Reviews - Staff, Reviews - Teens, Teen Services

princess kaguya 2

Featured earlier this month at the Brattle Street Theatre near Harvard Square, The Tale of Princess Kaguya is a splendid new masterpiece from Studio Ghibli. The BPL has several copies on order so place your requests now to borrow a copy when they arrive. Princess Kaguya is a classic Japanese fairy tale about a magical girl who mysteriously appears in a bamboo stalk while an aged bamboo cutter is working in the forest. The tale tells a multifaceted story about family joy and longing, a girl coming of age, and the deeper spiritual mysteries of the human experience. The artwork is revolutionary for studio Ghibli. Set in a more rice paper/watercolor style, the animation, use of light and shadow, and extreme dynamic effects reminiscent of expressionism captivate the viewer throughout the film. The artists employ unique cell work with dappling shadow overlays as the characters interact and move through the bamboo groves and deeper woods. The overall palette of rice paper-style imagery completely immerses the viewer in an authentic Japanese artistic world. The dynamic effects during dream sequences and storm scenes are gripping, even in their minimalism. I strongly recommend this film for all anime fans. Even loyal Studio Ghibli fans will be impressed by this new direction in artistic style. The story is classic and refreshing at the same time. Beyond its imagery, Princess Kaguya is a bold venture into the depths of the human struggle.