Boston Public Library
Teens

January Releases to Check Out

Posted on January 5th, 2015 by vkovenmatasy@private.bpl.org in Books

Welcome to 2015! Here are five books coming out in January that we’re especially excited for — click on the picture to get to the library’s record and place a hold now so you can be the first to read them!

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The Boy in the Black Suit, by Jason Reynolds

Just when seventeen-year-old Matt thinks he can’t handle one more piece of terrible news, he meets a girl who’s dealt with a lot more—and who just might be able to clue him in on how to rise up when life keeps knocking him down—in this wry, gritty novel from the author of When I Was the Greatest.

Matt wears a black suit every day. No, not because his mom died—although she did, and it sucks. But he wears the suit for his gig at the local funeral home, which pays way better than the Cluck Bucket, and he needs the income since his dad can’t handle the bills (or anything, really) on his own. So while Dad’s snagging bottles of whiskey, Matt’s snagging fifteen bucks an hour. Not bad. But everything else? Not good. Then Matt meets Lovey. She’s got a crazy name, and she’s been through more crazy than he can imagine. Yet Lovey never cries. She’s tough. Really tough. Tough in the way Matt wishes he could be. Which is maybe why he’s drawn to her, and definitely why he can’t seem to shake her. Because there’s nothing more hopeful than finding a person who understands your loneliness—and who can maybe even help take it away.

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The Darkest Part of the Forest, by Holly Black

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.

Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.

At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.

Until one day, he does…

As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

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Fairest: Levana’s Story, by Marissa Meyer

Mirror, mirror on the wall, Who is the fairest of them all? Fans of the Lunar Chronicles know Queen Levana as a ruler who uses her “glamour” to gain power. But long before she crossed paths with Cinder, Scarlet, and Cress, Levana lived a very different story – a story that has never been told . . . until now. Marissa Meyer spins yet another unforgettable tale about love and war, deceit and death. This extraordinary book includes full-color art and an excerpt from Winter , the next book in the Lunar Chronicles series.

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I Was Here, by Gayle Forman

When her best friend Meg drinks a bottle of industrial-strength cleaner alone in a motel room, Cody is understandably shocked and devastated. She and Meg shared everything—so how was there no warning? But when Cody travels to Meg’s college town to pack up the belongings left behind, she discovers that there’s a lot that Meg never told her. About her old roommates, the sort of people Cody never would have met in her dead-end small town in Washington. About Ben McAllister, the boy with a guitar and a sneer, who broke Meg’s heart. And about an encrypted computer file that Cody can’t open—until she does, and suddenly everything Cody thought she knew about her best friend’s death gets thrown into question.

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A List of Things That Didn’t Kill Me, by Jason Schmidt

How does a good kid overcome a bad childhood? Jason Schmidt’s searing debut memoir explores that question with unflinching clarity and wit, in the tradition of Jeannette Walls’ The Glass Castle.

Jason Schmidt wasn’t surprised when he came home one day during his junior year of high school and found his father, Mark, crawling around in a giant pool of blood. Things like that had been happening a lot since Mark had been diagnosed with HIV, three years earlier.

Jason’s life with Mark was full of secrets—about drugs, crime, and sex. If the straights—people with normal lives—ever found out any of those secrets, the police would come. Jason’s home would be torn apart. So the rule, since Jason had been in preschool, was never to tell the straights anything.

A List of Things That Didn’t Kill Me is a funny, disturbing memoir full of brutal insights and unexpected wit that explores the question: How do you find your moral center in a world that doesn’t seem to have one?

Take the Epic Reads “365 Days of YA” Challenge!

Posted on January 3rd, 2015 by vkovenmatasy@private.bpl.org in Books

Are you looking for something to read in the new year? Epic Reads, the fansite for publishing company HarperCollins, has put together a reading list for you with a suggestion for every single day of the year. Check it out — and don’t forget to tell your librarian what you think of the books!

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The Neverending Story – A Review

Posted on December 29th, 2014 by vkovenmatasy@private.bpl.org in Books, Reviews - Teens

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Title/Author: The Neverending Story by Michael Ende

Read by: Niyah-Chandler Brown

Summary: There was a boy name Bastian he found a mysterious book. That had racing snails, handglider bats, soaring luck dragons (Falkor). The book that Bastian had found there was a boy on an adventure. He was a childlike empress. He is supposed to go and save the world by going to the princess so she can give him the power to keep the world alive. The only way to do that is if Bastian keeps reading The Book (the neverending story).

Series or standalone? Standalone

Genre/subgenre: fairy tale

Would I re-read? Yes, I would.

Personal thoughts: I wish there was a second book that could continue the adventure Atrave was on.

Born of Illusion – A Review

Posted on December 18th, 2014 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

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Title/Author: Born of Illusion by Teri Brown
Read by: Anna at the Central Library Teen Room / Read for our TBOM book discussion group on December 19th.
Summary: Anna is a magician used to traveling with her mother who is a medium. Together they put on shows and seances to make money. It’s mostly a con. But what her mother doesn’t know is that Anna has real paranormal abilities and lately, she’s been getting visions of a very terrible ending to their lives.
Series/Standalone: book one
Genre/sub-genre: Historical/Paranormal
Diversity: none that stood out
Could I Relate to These Characters: yes
Would I re-read?: yes
Personal thoughts: Once I started reading, I could not put this book down. I love the 1920’s New York City setting and I love stories about magic. I think Teri Brown did a fantastic job bringing them both together. While this is the first in a series, it can be read as a standalone as well, yet, I’m looking forward to reading the second one just to see what might happen next.

Hell Hole – A Review

Posted on December 9th, 2014 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff
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Title/Author: Hell Hole by Gina Damico

Read by: Anna/Central Teen Room

Release Date: January 6, 2015

Summary: Max is a good kid. He would never even think about stealing something. But the cat pin is so distracting he can’t help but walk away with it. The only problem is, his stealing brings a devil up from down below and Burg will never be happy unless Max steals him junk food and secures him a stolen mansion with a hot tub. What’s a teenager to do? Especially when his Mom is sick in bed waiting for a heart transplant? Life couldn’t get any more complicated.

Series/Standalone: standalone

Genre/sub-genre: Light Urban Fantasy/Paranormal/Humor

Diversity: none that stood out

Relatable characters: yes

Would I re-read?: No.

Personal thoughts: This book was very well written, and I would recommend it to those who like reading humorous, paranormal stories with a tiny bit of romance thrown in. While I really enjoyed her Croak trilogy, this one just wasn’t for me. The humor didn’t grab me the way it did in Croak, and I think that was what turned me off to it. However, if you’re into crude humor about a devil who refuses to wear any pants and his reasons for not wearing pants, among other things, you’ll definitely like this.