Teens

Ctrl+Z: Girls Makers & Coders Program

Posted on April 22nd, 2016 by chalpin@private.bpl.org in Technology, Teen Services
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Girls Makers & Coders, an 8-week program, is about to head into its fourth week here in the Lab at Teen Central. The program is designed to provide an opportunity for young women, ages 12-18, to gain experience with hands-on projects that incorporate different skill sets, including design processes and computer coding. The focus of these projects is around “wearables” – clothing or accessories that are fabricated using technology or have computers or technological functions built in to their design. (A current exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts highlights the relevance and excitement coming out of this particular area of innovative design.) The program is being led by knowledgeable volunteers and 9 registered girls are participating.

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Learning about circuits and laying out their design.

Organizations such as Girls Who Code, Black Girls Code, and Change the Equation are bringing awareness, seeking solutions, and providing programs to address the gender and minority gap in STEM related fields. (For more information specifically about the gender gap, look here). It is our hope that the library can also be place where an interest in science, technology, engineering, and math can be sparked and explored. The library, as an informal learning center where people are encouraged delve into their interests, is perfectly situated for like-minded youth to meet and work together in a low-stress, fun environment all while gaining new skills to build upon in the future.

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Success! After sewing with conductive thread, LED’s are properly connected to their battery.

 

After working on smaller, individual projects that aim to build a foundation in concepts such as circuitry, and an introduction to computer code, participants will collaborate to design and create a larger interactive project with colorful lights (LEDs) controlled by sensors and code with a wearable microcontroller. Through this process participants will also be able to employ crucial 21st Century Skills by exercising their creativity, thinking critically, effectively communicating with their team, and successfully collaborating to complete their unique project.

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Sewing with conductive thread.

 

 

 

 

When the program wraps up in the coming weeks, check back here and I’ll update with more info about their finished project!

 

 

 

 

 

 

hologram on 9-16-15 at 7.25 PM #3Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow a book? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

*”Ctrl+Z” is all about fearlessly exploring technology. Look here for info about teens, technology, and having fun with new media by Catherine, Teen Technology Coordinator at Teen Central, on the fourth Friday of every month.

Teens Leading in the Community: Teen Tech Mentors

Posted on April 19th, 2016 by jsnow@private.bpl.org in Teen Services

Welcome to this month’s post on Teens Leading in the Community. Each month I will feature an interview or a story about teens leading in the community. This could be a teen in a leadership position in school, in the library or in the community. We want to feature stories about teens leading and making a difference in their communities.

Teneh and Warheal, Teen Tech Mentors

The Teen Tech Mentors program is an opportunity for Boston teens in grades 9-11 and takes place in Teen Central. This is the pilot year of the program and Teneh and Warheal are the first ever Teen Tech Mentors. The Teen Tech Mentors program is a paid opportunity that runs from September through May, and the mentors are trained in a number of the software programs we have in the Lab (digital makerspace), such as Ableton (music creation software), Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Autodesk 123D Design (3D creation software) and more. They then develop and implement programs for teens in the Lab. So far they have run a logo creation workshop, a design a phone case program, 3D design programs, and will be leading some music creation programs in May. The Teen Tech Mentor program is a great opportunity for teens who are interested in technology, learning new skills and then teaching other teens those skills. If you are interested in finding out more about this opportunity and applying for next year, please email teencentral@bpl.org.

 

 

jessi250-150x150Are you interested in learning more about leadership opportunities? The Boston Public Library, Teen Central has a Teen Leadership Council that meets monthly in Teen Central and there is a job help page that provides information on  job opportunities, volunteer and internship opportunities.

Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow a book? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

*”Teens Leading in the Community” features interviews and stories about teens leading in their communities by Jessi, the Teen Services Team Leader, Central, on the third Tuesday of every month.

Get Crafty: 3D Origami Lucky Stars

Posted on April 15th, 2016 by Mary in Crafts, Teen Services
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Welcome to this month’s installment of Get Crafty. How many of you love making origami items? This month, we are going to make 3D Origami Lucky Stars.

3d lucky star origami

Materials needed: Lucky star paper that comes in so many colors and textures or strips of origami paper or regular printing paper cut in strips. The bigger the paper, the bigger the star. That’s it!

 

Now you can start folding your paper. Sometimes it’s easier to learn how to fold the paper, especially making the knot at the beginning, by looking at a video. I found a great tutorial showing you how to create beautiful 3D Origami Lucky Stars. There is no speaking. Instead, there are captions to help you understand each step with some nice background music.

Did you ever want to know why they are they called Lucky Stars? You can learn about the story at time mark 5:51 on the video below.

 

For a non-video tutorial, check out the Origami-Instructions.com website for Origami Lucky Star Folding.

lucky star step one: paper folded into a knot

This picture is shows the completed Step 1 where the paper is folded into a knot.

 

There are so many things you can do with your completed Lucky Stars. Here are a few examples:

 

lucky stars in a jar

Put them in a Hello Kitty Jar or other decorative jar for yourself or to give as a gift.

 

origami 3d lucky star funny faces

Draw funny faces on your Lucky Stars.

 

diy origami lucky star picture frame

Use your Lucky Stars to decorate a picture frame or the edges of a mirror.

 

I hope you have as much fun as I did making the Origami 3D Lucky Stars. Enjoy!

 

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Origami is so much fun to do. The Boston Public Library has a great collection of origami project books that you can browse, check out and take home.

Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow a book? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

*”Get Crafty” features craft projects by Mary, a Teen Librarian at Teen Central, and is posted on the third Friday of every month.

Reading Backwards, Watching in Japanese: Erased & Lone Wolf and Cub Omnibus 11

Posted on April 12th, 2016 by jkenney@private.bpl.org in Books, Movies, Reviews - Staff

This new installment on our teen blog includes two great titles from our friends in Japan. First, Erased, or Boku dake ga Inai Machi (The Town Where Only I am Missing, BokuMachi) is the hit new series that just finished on Crunchyroll and other anime outlets. Second, Lone Wolf and Cub Omnibus Volume 11, adds another wonderful samurai epic to the manga shelves at the Hyde Park Branch.

 

ErasedErased is a mystery-thriller with a scifi base. The hero, Sartoru Fujimuna, discovers he can go back in time whenever he experiences an intense trauma. He is falsely accused of a crime when he is older and gets transported back to his grade school days, shortly before the mysterious disappearance of his classmate, Kayo Hinazuki.  The character art work and development is strong and original in this new series. Costumes are realistic yet interesting as you might expect from a present day drama. The animation shows great virtual cinematography at many scene changes and “camera” pans. I remember seeing at least one “zoom and truck” depth effect made famous by Alfred Hitchcock in the movie Vertigo. The technique creates a perspective stretching effect while holding the subject in focus and in mid frame. The director, Tomohiko Itou, also combines vertical panning and rotation of the camera effects on particular scenes, adding to the psychological thrill. And of course, the story features a movie film reel effect that represents Sartoru’s ability to go back in time, changing history and helping his friends. But can he save himself? This series will have you yearning for more after the very first episode. There may be a spinoff, but unlike other famous titles that seem to go on forever, Erased is a “well made play” and the story is woven together tightly in 12 episodes. Some development and suspense do get lost from the manga, but this is a common situation when manga are converted to anime. Here, it is done well and for the usual reasons of time and production effort. The series is really good and I strongly recommend it for anime fans. Watch it in Japanese with English subtitles. It’s good for you to read, and the voice acting spot on! The story just concluded on Crunchyroll and we watched it faithfully at Anime Club here in Hyde Park. You can find it at Crunchyroll, Funimation, or Anime Planet.

 

Lone wolf and cubLone Wolf & Cub Omnibus 11 is a steady-paced, suspense-infused, shonen manga. This was the first time I read any of the series and I was greatly impressed. It’s the number one selling graphic novel! The story is by Kazuo Koike and the art is by Goseki Kojima. Translation by Dana Lewis. The artwork features amazing pen and ink brush technique. Pen strokes provide minute detail and brushwork adds great shadow effects, both light and dark.  The story follows a young ronin, Ogami Itto with his son Daigoro, and an aged master ninja Yagyu Retsudo. Yagyu is held prisoner by a court poisoner-tester who once saved Daigoro from horrible frostbite when he was a baby. Ogami and Yagyu are sworn enemies and have an outstanding challenge to duel to the death. Great Bushido and Ninjutsu codes of honor run deep in this epic and the contrasts among other characters are stark and varied. The pacing of the story lends to the suspense and gravity of the epic. Finally it culminates in a fantastic series of fireworks signals, dramatic sword play, self sacrifice, and a bold festival procession. There is mild gore in some spots, as might be expected, but the fantastic landscapes, cityscapes and ink washes provide a strong balance of beauty in the story. Weather and night time effects, even illustrated in black and white, enthrall the reader. I highly recommend this title for samurai and shonen manga fans out there. You can request this volume from the BPL in hard copy here or in ebook format here. And this series is set in the western left-to-right format so you don’t even have to read it backwards!

 

 

john250-150x150Did you know that in addition to physical books and DVDs, your library card gives you access to anime and graphic novels online? The BPL subscribes to Hoopla, a streaming service that allows you to check out and enjoy the media you love on your computer, tablet or smartphone. You can learn more about the BPL’s digital media collections here.

Want company while you’re watching anime? The Hyde Park Teen Anime Club meets on Thursdays at 2:30 p.m.

 

*”Reading Backwards, Watching in Japanese” features reviews of anime and manga by John, the Teen Librarian at the Hyde Park Branch, on the second Tuesday of every month.

Cooking with Caren: Baked Ziti

Posted on April 8th, 2016 by crosales@private.bpl.org in Recipes, Teen Services

Hungry?!?!?!

 

Turn your day from

1198900 to 56564001 in 6 easy steps!!

 

1. Make Ziti (16 oz) as directed on the package.

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2. Mix 1 jar (24 oz) of pasta sauce and 1 container (15 oz) of ricotta cheese in large bowl. Add pasta and 1/2 cup mozzarella cheese; mix lightly.

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3. Spoon into baking dishes sprayed with cooking spray; sprinkle with remaining mozzarella and Parmesan cheese. Cover.

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4. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes; uncover. Bake for 10 minutes.

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5. Wait…and wait…and wait some more.

Chandler Joey

 

6. ENJOY!

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icon of carenAre you still looking for more recipes? The Boston Public Library has a huge collection of cookbooks that you can browse, check out and take home.

Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow a book? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

 

*”Cooking with Caren” features recipe posts by Caren, the Teen Librarian at the Mattapan Branch, on the second Friday of every month.