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Posts Tagged ‘Banned Books Week’

It’s Banned Books Week and Teen Books Are Getting Special Attention

Posted on September 24th, 2013 by Akunna in Books, News, Teen Services

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Banned Books Week, promoted by the American Library Association (ALA), is a time to celebrate the freedom to read!

This is especially important for teens because teen books are more frequently challenged or banned. Why? According to president of the ALA Barbara Stripling

 

“Young adult [books] is a big trend right now, and a high number of complaints are directed at those books…There is a lot of pressure to keep teenagers safe and protected, especially in urban areas, and we are seeing many more complaints about alcohol, smoking, suicide and sexually explicit material…

Teenagers tell us that they like to read about what’s going on…They say ‘what do they [adults] think we are?’, as if teenagers remain naive and uneducated when facing these issues every day. The best way to protect them is to give them an array of things to read. If they are over-sheltered, they will enter the world without coping skills.”

 

So read, read away and feel free to ask your local librarian questions about banned books!

If you’re looking for reading suggestions–

Top Ten Most Frequently Banned Books in the Past Year

Patrick Ness, author of the Chaos Walking series, has some books to recommend , too.

 

Banned Books Week

Posted on October 6th, 2012 by Mary in Books, Events, Teen Services

Well we have come to the end of another Banned Books Week (September 30-October 6, 2012). It is amazing how many books are added each year and the reasons for the books being added to the list. Goodwill Librarian posted a link on her Facebook timeline of a Youtube video showing many of the books that have been challenged and/or banned from 1990-2000. The video was from Banned Books Week in 2008, but it is still interesting to see what books were on the list. The book covers are shown for the viewer.

Have you read any of these books? What are you favorites? Do you think they should have been banned or challenged?

For information about Banned Books Week and Celebrating our Freedom to Read, check out http://www.ala.org/advocacy/banned/bannedbooksweek or http://bannedbooksweek.org/.

The American Library Association has also created an interactive timeline to highlight some of the books that have been challenged or banned in the past 3o years. http://www.ala.org/advocacy/banned/frequentlychallenged/timeline30-years-liberating-literature

If you are interested in reading any of the books, visit your local branch library or request them with your Boston Public Library card (or OneCards or any Massachusetts library cards registered at the Boston Public Library) on the online BPL Catalog.

Celebrate your freedom to read what you want to read!! Yay!!