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Posts Tagged ‘Black History Month’

Black History Month

Posted on February 1st, 2016 by Anna in Teen Services

black history month

The Origins of Black History Month

  • In 1915, American historian, Dr. Carter G. Woodson and minister Jesse E. Moorland started an organization known as the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) which was dedicated to researching and promoting achievements by black Americans.
  • ASNLH first celebrated Black History Week on February 12, 1926 because they believed in the need to celebrate the achievements of African-American men and women.
  • They chose the date because it includes the anniversaries of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday and the death of Frederick Douglass
  • Symbolically, this period reflected Woodson’s belief that African-American history was American history.
  • After the first Black History Week, city mayors across the country began to recognize it and celebrate it
  • Schools and communities were inspired to organize celebrations, establish history clubs and host performances and lectures
  • President Gerald R. Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976, calling upon the public to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”
  • Today ASNLH is known as Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)

 

books

Looking for specific books to celebrate Black History Month?

We have a Black History Month list in our catalog here to get you started.

Black is… is a booklist in our catalog of recent titles, developed annually for Black History Month. This list can also be found here as a printable brochure.

Rosa Parks’ 100th Birthday

Posted on February 11th, 2013 by Akunna in News, Teen Services

The civil rights leader, Rosa Parks, turns 100 this month!

Many of us may have read a lot about how she sparked the 13 month long Montgomery Bus Boycott on Dec. 1, 1955 by refusing to give up her seat to a white person on a segregated bus. But did you know that Rosa Parks had been kicked off a bus before 10 years before the Boycott, by the same bus driver, for opposing segregation rules? Did you know that she remained an activist after the Boycott, around issues like having Black history in schools and anti-police brutality? 

Now is a perfect opportunity to learn more about this civil rights hero:

1) Check out the article 10 Things You Didn’t Know about Rosa Parks for more interesting facts about Rosa Parks.

2) Read about Parks’ life in her own words. Check out Rosa Parks: My Story  from the library.

 

 

 

 

 

3) Listen to this rare interview  with Parks on the Boycott.

4) Next time you’re in the post office, check out the new stamp!