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Teens’ Top Ten Books From 2011

Posted on October 21st, 2011 by Anna in Books

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), had nine thousand teens vote on their top ten book choices of 2011. What did they pick? Here’s a video done up by our one-time Teen Librarian (from the Grove Hall branch), Amy Fisk Check it out and see which ones you need to check out today!

YALSA Teens’ Top Ten.

The number one teen pick of 2011 was Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare! Below is her acceptance video. Check it out!

Can’t view the video above?  Here’s the top ten list:

  1. Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare (Simon & Schuster)
  2. Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic)
  3. Crescendo by Becca Fitzpatrick (Simon & Schuster)
  4. I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore (HarperCollins)
  5. The Iron King by Julie Kagawa (Harlequin)
  6. Matched by Ally Condie (Penguin)
  7. Angel: A Maximum Ride Novel by James Patterson (Little, Brown & Company)
  8. Paranormalcy by Kiersten White (HarperCollins)
  9. Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver (HarperCollins)
  10. Nightshade by Andrea Cremer (Penguin)

For more information on YALSA and the Teen’s Top Ten, check them out here: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/yalsa/teenreading/teenstopten/teenstopten.cfm

Creating The Paper Airplane

Posted on August 29th, 2011 by Anna in Books, Resources

Ever wondered how paper airplanes got started?

How old do you think they are?

Think one paper airplane is the same as the next?

Check out this article on Yahoo! to read about the possible history of the paper device, follow the videos to create your own, and then check out your local branch library to check out books on the subject! We definitely have a few here at Copley in the Teen Room!

http://games.yahoo.com/blogs/plugged-in/high-fliers-5-great-paper-airplane-designs-211731336.html

Most Recent Staff Book Reviews!

Posted on July 22nd, 2011 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

These are the most recent staff reviews of teen books. All staff reviews can be found under the above tab “Librarians Read Too!”, but I thought I would highlight the recent ones here, so you know they exist, that we’re still reading teen books. We always read teen books.

The Marbury Lens by Andrew Smith

Read by: Anna/Copley Teen Room

This book is crazy and insane all at once. It’s the story of a boy who finds himself kidnapped after getting drunk at his friend’s party and attempting to walk home alone. Going to England for a few weeks to see if he wants to attend a boarding school, he’s given a pair of glasses from a stranger. These glasses show him a war-torn world where he’s forced to fight against his best friend.

In short, this book is one insane ride. It’s like getting hooked on drugs… but without the drugs. You’ll find yourself sucked into the world of Marbury, and unable to leave, similar to the characters in the book. I highly recommend it.

Bright Young Things by Anna Godbersen

Read by: Anna/Copley Teen Room

Do you like fancy parties, flappers, stage performances, rich dresses, a little side romance, along with a dish of violence?  Then this is the series for you. This book, the first in a new series, was a truly fantastic read set in 1920′s New York City. It’s the story of two young girls who move to the city to find themselves and make a name for themselves. Set in a time when it was illegal to sell or drink alcohol, these girls find their way into the speakeasies of the city and into the homes of the greatest alcohol sellers of the time. What they find there, both surprises and scares them. It’s a truly great read, a page turner that’s garunteed to keep you reading late into the night!

The Abused Werewolf Rescue Group by Catherine Jinx

Read by: Anna/Copley Teen Room

This book is the sequel to The Reformed Vampire Support Group also written by Catherine Jinx. Not having read the first book, I didn’t feel out of place at all. In fact, I rather enjoyed this book. It wasn’t cheesy, and the only mention of “mates” was because it was set in Austraila where everyone calls each other “mate”. It was funny, some parts were scary, his mother was annoying in that way that only a mother can be, and his friends, new and old were pretty cool. I would love to recommend this book to anyone looking for a werewolf book that’s a little out of the ordinary. My favorite quote from the book?

“Barry can’t be the first vampire who’s fanged a werewolf. And the whole ideas of zombies must have come from somewhere.” -The Abused Werewolf Rescue Group

YA Highway’s Road Trip Wednesday #60

Posted on December 29th, 2010 by Anna in Books

This week’s topic is…

What is the best book you read in December?

Don’t forget to give us the title and the author! And, if you can tell us why you liked it so much, I’m sure everyone would enjoy hearing what you have to say!

As for myself, I’d have to go with The Outside of a Horse by Ginny Rorby. I love horse books, first and foremost. In fact, I’ve already got two more teen books about horses and unicorns checked out. That’s why I initially picked up the book. But, it’s so much more than a horse book! It’s the story of a young girl only 14 years old, struggling to keep her family from falling apart after her father returns from Iraq missing a leg. In the past, watching horse races had bonded her and her father together. After his return, learning to trust in real flesh and blood animals, just might help them rebuild that bond and help her father overcome his loss and his addiction to alcohol. It was an extremely realistic and emotional read, that had me in tears during several points. It’s one I highly recommend!

And, if you’re looking to check it out, we’ll have it on our “emotional reads” book display in the Copley Teen room all next month unless someone borrows it.

_____________________

YA Highway is a blog (www.yahighway.com) by a group of young adult authors from all over the world! And every Wednesday YA Highway’s contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question and answer it on their own blogs. You can hop from destination to destination, from their blog, and get everybody’s unique take on the topic.

But, why not do the same thing on our blog every week? I’ll post their question and you can put your answers in our comments section, or on your own blog and link back to it in our comments (and theirs too, if you’d like, because I’m sure they’d enjoy reading your answers!)

YA Highway’s Roadtrip Wednesday #59

Posted on December 22nd, 2010 by Anna in Books

YA Highway is a blog (www.yahighway.com) by a group of young adult authors from all over the world! And every Wednesday YA Highway’s contributors post a weekly writing- or reading-related question and answer it on their own blogs. You can hop from destination to destination, from their blog, and get everybody’s unique take on the topic.

But, why not do the same thing on our blog every week? I’ll post their question and you can put your answers in our comments section, or on your own blog and link back to it in our comments (and theirs too, if you’d like, because I’m sure they’d enjoy reading your answers!) Sound cool? Awesome. So, have at it:

This Week’s Topic:
Give a book character a Christmas present!

What would you give your favourite characters for Christmas, and why? Would you give Harry Potter contact lenses? Bella Swan a copy of He’s Just Not That Into You? Or maybe a lifetime supply of cherry cola to Bianca Piper, so she always has something to throw at guys who don’t behave?

Put your answers in our comments section and let’s see what you all have to say! Just remember to also list not only the character, the gift, and why, but also the title and the author of the book! And of course, it doesn’t have to be for Christmas just because that’s the major holiday coming up. You can certainly give a Hanukkah gift if you’d prefer!

As for my response… (What? You didn’t think I would answer this as well? Well, you thought wrong! Of course I’m going to answer these questions! Why wouldn’t I?) So… as for my response…

Title: Bloody Jack

Author: L.A. Meyer

Character, Gift, & Why: I would give Jacky Faber the gift not to get caught as a young girl pretending to be a boy aboard the HMS Dolphin in 1797. I would do this just so she doesn’t have to go to the girl’s school in Boston, Massachusetts in order to learn how to be a proper lady. Because, really, who wants to be proper with fancy clothes and so many pieces of dinnerware you’re not sure what to do with it all, when you could be swinging from the rigging on a ship fighting pirates and such? And she clearly prefered adventure to being proper and ladylike.