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Posts Tagged ‘paranormal’

Hell Hole – A Review

Posted on December 9th, 2014 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

hellhole

Title/Author: Hell Hole by Gina Damico

Read by: Anna/Central Teen Room

Release Date: January 6, 2015

Summary: Max is a good kid. He would never even think about stealing something. But the cat pin is so distracting he can’t help but walk away with it. The only problem is, his stealing brings a devil up from down below and Burg will never be happy unless Max steals him junk food and secures him a stolen mansion with a hot tub. What’s a teenager to do? Especially when his Mom is sick in bed waiting for a heart transplant? Life couldn’t get any more complicated.

Series/Standalone: standalone

Genre/sub-genre: Light Urban Fantasy/Paranormal/Humor

Diversity: none that stood out

Relatable characters: yes

Would I re-read?: No.

Personal thoughts: This book was very well written, and I would recommend it to those who like reading humorous, paranormal stories with a tiny bit of romance thrown in. While I really enjoyed her Croak trilogy, this one just wasn’t for me. The humor didn’t grab me the way it did in Croak, and I think that was what turned me off to it. However, if you’re into crude humor about a devil who refuses to wear any pants and his reasons for not wearing pants, among other things, you’ll definitely like this.

Forever – A Review

Posted on May 13th, 2014 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

Forever

Forever by Maggie Stiefvater

Read by:  Anna/Central Library

Forever is the final book in the Wolves of Mercy Falls Trilogy and chronicles the lives of Sam, who can no longer shift into his wolf form, his girlfriend, Grace, who is now learning to live life part-time as a wolf, Isabel who’s still not entirely thrilled with events as they unfold, and Cole, who has taken this opportunity to search for a cure.

Isabel’s father, Tom Culpepper, has gone to those men high up in the government that he can trust to get a helicopter raid on the wolves. He wants them dead for killing his son and several other teens. He wants the wolves dead. Now. The four teens, Sam, Grace, Isabel, and Cole, struggle to figure out what their future will look like post high school graduation while at the same time feeling lost as to what to do about the helicopter raid that will wipe out their family and friends.  What’s a part-time werewolf to do?

This book was just as good as the others in the trilogy. Even toward the end, the characters stayed in character. Those that did change, did it gradually and over a long period of time, keeping things very realistic for a book about werewolves. The believability of these books was something I really enjoyed. Reading this, I can very well believe that werewolves actually do exist. Of course they do. These are teens who are thrust out into the world on their own, struggling to figure out where they belong, and how to survive in a cruel world. It’s not easy. Yes, these teens do have parents who are also struggling with their own lives, but even so, the teens know they’re on their own. They can’t go to their parents for help because their parents wouldn’t understand. If you’ve read the other two books, you’ll know exactly why Sam doesn’t like trusting outsiders with the information that they’re not entirely human. Help does come in the most unlikely form, and when it does, it doesn’t take over the story. This new person doesn’t have all the magical answers, but helps them the best way possible. Nothing is perfect. And the romance between Sam and Grace, once again, was believable and sweet; a quiet assuredness that they’d found The One . It was great to see that in a young couple. On the opposite end of the spectrum, we have Isabel and Cole. They don’t really get along. And yet, they also get along extremely well at the same time because they’re a lot alike. It was good to see them in contrast to Grace and Sam. They were a good balance to the relationship spectrum.

In short, I loved this series because I love werewolves, I loved the relationships here, and I loved just how realistic these books were.