Teens

Posts Tagged ‘review’

Curl Up & Read: Symptoms of Being Human

Posted on April 1st, 2016 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

symptoms

Title: Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin

Read by: Anna, a Teen Central Librarian

Summary: Riley Cavanaugh is attending a new school, has debilitating anxiety and a congressman father running for re-election, and hasn’t come out yet. To anyone. Riley is gender fluid, which means some days Riley identifies as a boy and some days Riley identifies as a girl. With all of this going on, how on earth is Riley supposed to blend in, make friends, come out, and survive high school?

Genre/sub-genre: LGBTQ contemporary fiction

Series/Standalone: Standalone

Length: 335 pages

Personal thoughts: 

“People are complicated. And messy. Seems too convenient that we’d all fit inside some multiple-choice question.” – Riley Cavanaugh

This book is long overdue, because until now, stories about gender fluid people have been non-existent. Real and relatable, Symptoms of Being Human is a great look into what it means to be different in a way most people aren’t used to. No pronouns are used for Riley in the book, yet the author’s writing makes it feel very natural, not forced. Preferred pronouns (of which there are a lot of options) aren’t even mentioned by Riley’s therapist and transgender support group, which felt odd to me. Yet the lack of pronouns does serve as a reminder of just how binary society considers gender, and how much we gender everything without even thinking about it.

Riley’s story is very character driven. Riley’s parents are realistic, fully-developed and caring adults, just trying to do the best they can without knowing Riley’s secret. While there were a few minor friends I wanted to know more about, I loved Riley’s two friends from school. Solo and Bec were as well rounded, quirky, and engaging as Riley and they stood out as cool people I’d want to be friends with if I could.

This is a powerful and inspirational story that won’t let you go. I highly recommend this title for anyone who may identify as gender fluid and those who want to know what it means to be gender fluid. That said, I also highly recommend this title for those people who enjoy contemporary teen fiction and are just looking for a good read. Read on!

 

 

anna250-150x150Looking to borrow this library book? Look no further!

Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow this book? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

 

*”Curl Up & Read” posts book reviews by Anna, one of the Teen Librarians at Teen Central, on the first Friday of every month.

One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest – A Review

Posted on July 3rd, 2015 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

one flew over the cuckoo's nest

(Book 3 of 8 of my Summer Reading book reviews.)

Title/Author: One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey

Read by: Anna, Teen Central Librarian

Summary: In Nurse Ratched’s ward of the mental hospital Chief Bromden is a patient pretending to be deaf and dumb for the last twenty years. When a new patient, Randall Patrick McMurphy, walks through the door, swaggering larger than life, Chief watches him begin the hard task of rallying the other patients to challenge the dictatorship of Nurse Ratched with fishing trips, alcohol, gambling, and even women. Along the way, however, Chief realizes that McMurphy isn’t just challenging the other patients, but Chief as well.

Series/Standalone: Standalone

Genre/sub-genre: Classic Fiction

Diversity: Yes.

Relatable characters: Yes.

Would I recommend this to others?: yes.

Personal thoughts: This is not for the feint of heart. It’s a very dark book covering some dark topics, some that are only hinted at, while others are blatantly spelled out. That being said, I loved this book. Along with Chief, I was able to watch the men slowly regain their personalities, regain the right to be human against a nurse who sought complete control over them, which was a beautiful thing to see. The ending came as a huge surprise I wasn’t expecting, and yet, I found it oddly fitting for these characters. While it was published in 1962, I also think it’s still very relevant in today’s world. I highly recommend it.

Fire – A Review

Posted on April 1st, 2015 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

fire

Title/Author: Fire by Kristin Cashore

Read by: Anna, Teen Central Librarian

Summary: Fire is the last monster human alive, with the ability to read minds. When spies start appearing in the Dells with foggy brains, the king pleads with her to help with the interrogations, to figure out who means well and who doesn’t. But she doesn’t want to hurt anyone the way her father did and she considers interrogation almost inhumane. And yet, if she doesn’t help the king, war will break out and the kingdom could be lost.

Series/Standalone: Book 2 in the Graceling trilogy, but can be read as a standalone

Genre/sub-genre: Fantasy

Diversity: There are characters with mobility issues

Relatable characters: yes

Would I re-read?: Maybe

Personal thoughts: I enjoyed reading this, though I think I enjoyed the first book, Graceling, even more. Again, there is a romance in this story, but it doesn’t take over the story, and it doesn’t have the traditional ending most romances have, which I appreciated. The main character is strong, but also has weaknesses, which was also appreciated. She was realistic in that way.  There is one more book in this trilogy, Bitterblue, which I am intending to read next!

Graceling – A Review

Posted on March 25th, 2015 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

graceling

Title/Author: Graceling by Kristin Cashore

Read by: Anna, a Teen Central Librarian

Summary: Katsa is a Graceling, graced with the extreme skill to kill. Her uncle, the king, has been using her to keep control over his lands since she was a young girl. But then she meets Prince Po and finds a friend where she never expected to find one. With Po, she’ll work to break free from the bindings the king has placed on her and head off on a wild adventure that will teach her more about herself than even she knew was possible, all while keeping friends and family safe from unknown dangers.

Series/Standalone: Book 1 in the Graceling trilogy (but can also be read as a standalone)

Genre/sub-genre: Fantasy

Diversity: Characters are diverse in the fact that a select few are different than the rest, some have disabilities as well, though skin colors don’t play a factor, eye colors do.

Relatable characters: Yes

Would I re-read?: Yes

Personal thoughts: I loved the cover. I loved the fact that Katsa was a strong girl in mind and body, who didn’t lack emotions, who knew what she didn’t want in life and was strong enough to stick to that all the way through the book. Yes, there is a bit of romance here, but it’s never overwhelming, and the couple are friends first and foremost. The story was brilliant. Even I didn’t see how the puzzle pieces fit together until the very end. The world building was fantastic, and all of the characters were well rounded. I highly recommend this book to anyone who loves fantasy.

Golden Boy – A Review

Posted on September 5th, 2014 by Anna in Books, Reviews - Staff

golden boy

Golden Boy by Abigail Tarttelin

Read by: Anna/Central Teen Room

Golden Boy is the story of a fifteen-year-old boy who is intersex, meaning he has both male and female genitals. He is different. And he is very aware of his difference. His parents agreed to naming him Max after a long debate. His mother because it was a boy’s name. His father because it could be short for Maxine. Doctors wanted to do a genital reassignment surgery when he was a baby to turn him into a girl. Max’s father refused even as his mother thought it was the only way to go. It didn’t happen. New doctors wanted to do a reassignment surgery on him when he was thirteen to turn him into a boy because he’d taken on the role of a boy and looked more like a boy than a girl. Throughout all of this, Max drops his head and lets things happen to him, lets his parents decide his fate. And then one horrible night, his best friend does something terrible to him. Something that will change his life, and that of his family, forever. When Max finds out he can indeed have children, and is currently pregnant, he has no idea what he should do. Should he keep the child? Should he have the reassignment surgery to fully become a boy? Max, having kept his secrets from everyone, has no one to talk to, even his little brother is clueless to the things going on in his life. Just how will he cope? How will this affect his entire family? His father is running for Member of Parliament, which means the media will be all over the family. What if these secrets get out? What then?

At the end of the blurb on the inside cover, it says “…a novel you’ll read in one sitting…” Honestly, I didn’t believe that at first. But the deeper I got into the story, the more I couldn’t put it down! True, I didn’t read it in one sitting, but I would have if I could have. If I could describe this book in three words they would be: heartbreaking, gripping, and gut wrenching. All at the same time. I can’t recommend this book highly enough. I wanted to step into the book and be the friend Max needed. I wanted to smack his mother for the insensitive things she said. I understood why she said them, I know she thought she was doing the right things, but I still wanted to smack her. This book brought out all of my emotions, my anger, my sympathy, my fears for Max, everything. And the thing about this book that makes it even more gripping is the fact that people like Max really do exist. Right now, there is someone out there struggling with their life because of issues similar to Max’s. This is not some LGBTQ fantasy. This is real life for some people. And the realness of Golden Boy is scary and riveting. I  loved this book very much, for the plot, the well-rounded characters, and how well everything melded together. While this book was told from multiple points-of-view (Max, his 9-year-old brother, his mother, his father, his girlfriend), and while I normally don’t like books that go above two or three POVs, this one was handled expertly well. This is a book that both adults and teens will enjoy simply because you get into the heads of all of the main characters, and each one is written about very realistically. A heartbreaking, gut wrenching, gripping book, I urge everyone to pick up a copy and read it today!