Press Room

April Author Talks and Lectures

Posted on March 22nd, 2018 by rlavery in Media Releases

April author talks include visits from internationally-known transgender author and speaker Ryan Sallans, Boston Marathon survivors Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes, award-winning actress Christine Lahti, and more. All programs and events can be viewed via www.bpl.org/calendar.

  • Graphic designer Douglass Scott gives the 44th annual Dwiggins Lecture on the work and teaching of Alvin Eisenman – book designer and typographer for McGraw-Hill and the Yale University Press, and the creator of the first graduate program in graphic design in the United States and its head for 40 years. Tuesday, April 3, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Ryan Sallans, an internationally-known transgender speaker and author, explores his relationship with family, romantic partners, colleagues, and self. Thursday, April 5, at 6 p.m. in the Abbey Room at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Lowell Lecture Series. Following the lecture, join slam poets Black Venus and Eziah Blake for a performance centered on identity and expression. Afterward, the mic will be open to audience members who wish to share poems of their own. Thursday, April 5, at 7:30 p.m. in the Newsfeed Café.
  • Co-authors Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes, a married couple who were both injured during the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013, share their book Rescue & Jessica: A Life Changing Friendship on Thursday, April 5, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. They will be joined by illustrator Scott Magoon, and the star of the book and ASPCA Dog of the Year, Rescue.
  • Award-winning and acclaimed director and stage, television, and film actress Christine Lahti discusses her comical essay collection True Stories from an Unreliable Eyewitness: A Feminist Coming of Age on Tuesday, April 10, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • South End resident William Kuhn, author of the bestseller Queen Takes the Train, shares his latest work Prince Harry Boy to Man on Tuesday, April 10, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes Series.
  • Michael Vieira examines the history, legends, and people associated with some of the geological wonders in New England and shares excerpts from his book New England Rocks: Historic Geological Wonders on Wednesday, April 11, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Patrick L. Kennedy takes attendees back to another time, when bricklayers, plumbers, and printers could take the stage as star athletes as he discusses his book Bricklayer Bill: The Untold Story of the Workingman’s Boston Marathon on Thursday, April 12, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Keith Morgan, Professor Emeritus of History of Art & Architecture and American & New England Studies at Boston University, discusses the legacy of groundbreaking landscape architects Frederick Law Olmsted and Charles Eliot. Following the talk, the Leventhal Map Center hosts a guided tour of their new exhibition, Breathing Room: Mapping Boston’s Green Spaces. Monday, April 23, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • WCVB’s Chronicle reporter Ted Reinstein discusses his latest book New England’s General Stores: Exploring an American Classic and offers a nostalgic picture of these colonial staples and steadfast institutions of small towns from Connecticut to Maine. Wednesday, April 25, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Boston Globe reporter Emily Sweeney shares excerpts from her book Gangland Boston, revealing the history of notorious gangsters and the places they frequented on Monday, April 30, at 6 p.m. at the South Boston Branch, located at 646 East Broadway.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY


Boston Public Library provides educational, cultural and civic enrichment, free to all, for the residents of Boston, Massachusetts and beyond, through its collections, services, programs, and spaces. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library is a pioneer of public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. As a City of Boston historic cultural institution, Boston Public Library today features a Central Library, twenty-five branches, a map center, business library, archival center; extensive special collections of rare books, manuscripts, photographs, and prints; and rich digital content and online services. The award-winning renovation of the Central Library in Copley Square, completed in 2016, together with new, renovated and historic branches, provide a transformed library for the next generation of users. Boston Public Library enriches lives, hosting thousands of free educational programs and exhibitions, and provides free library services online and in-person to millions of people each year.  To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Call for Applications for Associates of the Boston Public Library Writer in Residence Program

Posted on March 15th, 2018 by rlavery in Media Releases

The Associates of the Boston Public Library is pleased to announce a call for applications for the 2018–2019 Writer-in-Residence fellowship program. Projects eligible for this program include fiction, non-fiction, a script, or poetry works, intended for children or young adults. The program guidelines and application form are available online at www.writer-in-residence.org. Submissions are due by April 5, 2018.

The Associates’ Writer-in-Residence fellowship provides an emerging author with the financial support and dedicated time needed to complete one literary work within a nine-month period. The recipient is awarded a $20,000 stipend and receives a private office in the Boston Public Library’s Central Library in Copley Square. Authors are provided with a forum to promote their finished work and have opportunities to establish connections with writers, publishers, and the community through participation in Library events. The winner is selected by members of the local literary community, via a blind judging process. The program is funded thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor.

“The fellowship is more than just a place to work and a stipend, it’s a call to arms,” says 2014–2015 recipient Natalie Coward Anderson. “The sense of momentum makes you realize you can actually do this. And the knowledge that you’re being trusted to be a ‘real’ writer—you just can’t put a price on it.”

The residency has enabled several talented children’s authors to launch their literary careers, including Elaine Dimopoulos, Hannah Barnaby, and Sarah Winifred Searle. Going into the program’s 15th year, alumni have published, or are in the process of publishing, 31 books. Alum Annie Hartnett (2013–2014) wrote Rabbit Cake during her residency, which received rave reviews and praise, including being named a Best Book of 2017 by Kirkus Reviews. City of Saints and Thieves, written by Natalie Coward Anderson (2014­–2015) while she was in residence, was not only highly praised, but the film rights have been purchased by Universal Pictures, led by actress Kerry Washington. 2015–2016 alum Jennifer De Leon recently sold her debut novel, written during her residency, Don’t Ask Me Where I’m From to Atheneum.

 

About the ASSOCIATES OF THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

The Associates of the Boston Public Library is an independent nonprofit dedicated to conserving the Boston Public Library’s Special Collections of rare books, manuscripts, works of art, musical scores and other items of historic significance. The Associates is working to ensure continued public access to these irreplaceable treasures by underwriting their conservation, cataloging, digitization, and exhibition. Through these efforts, the Associates aims to help the Boston Public Library fulfill its most essential mission of providing top quality, free educational resources to the public, as well as preserving knowledge, culture, and history for the benefit of all.

Since its founding in 1972, the Associates has been the creator and underwriter of a wide array of programs, including: Literary Lights (an annual black tie dinner honoring outstanding New England authors); the Hundred-Year Retroactive Book Award competition; art and architecture tours; readings; lectures; curatorial evenings designed to enhance public awareness of the Library’s holdings; exhibitions; musical performances; and discussions of current events featuring key decision makers. To learn more, visit www.TheAssociates.org, www.Facebook.com/AssociatesBPL, www.Twitter.com/AssociatesBPL, and www.Instagram.com/AssociatesBPL.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Boston Public Library provides educational, cultural and civic enrichment, free to all, for the residents of Boston, Massachusetts and beyond, through its collections, services, programs, and spaces. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library is a pioneer of public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. As a City of Boston historic cultural institution, Boston Public Library today features a Central Library, twenty-five branches, a map center, business library, archival center; extensive special collections of rare books, manuscripts, photographs, and prints; and rich digital content and online services. The award-winning renovation of the Central Library in Copley Square, completed in 2016, together with new, renovated and historic branches, provide a transformed library for the next generation of users. Boston Public Library enriches lives, hosting thousands of free educational programs and exhibitions, and providing free library services online and in-person to millions of people each year.  To learn more, visit bpl.org.

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Boston Public Library’s March Author Talks and Lectures

Posted on February 21st, 2018 by rlavery in Media Releases

Lowell Lecture Series continues, Junot Díaz shares first children’s book

Boston Public Library’s March talks and lectures feature celebrated authors Junot Díaz and Kelly Barnhill, award-winning investigative journalist and author Joseph Rosenbloom, conservationist Terry Tempest Williams, and more. All programs and events can be viewed via www.bpl.org/calendar.

  • Get an inside look at John and Robert Kennedy’s essential partnership during the turbulent first year of JFK’s presidency with an exclusive screening of an episode of the CNN Original Series, American Dynasties: The Kennedys. After the screening, an engaging discussion panel features Patrick J. Kennedy, former U.S. Representative (D-RI); Leah Wright Rigueur, professor of public policy at Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Kennedy biographer Larry Tye, and moderator John King, CNN anchor and Chief National Correspondent. Thursday, March 1, at  6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • The panel discussion “The Common Wealth of Prints: A Dialog between Five Bay State Collections” is led by prints experts and provides insight into the wealth of prints and print collections in and around Boston, moderated by BPL President David Leonard. Saturday, March 3, at 10:45 a.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. This event is presented in conjunction with “The Boston Printmakers: 70 Years,” a day-long symposium on prints and printmaking to take place at 15 institutions and galleries from Boston to Cambridge commemorating the Boston Printmakers’ 70th anniversary.
  • Boston Globe reporter Emily Sweeney shares excerpts from her book Gangland Boston, revealing the history of notorious gangsters and the places they frequented on Monday, March 5, at 6:30 p.m. at the West Roxbury Branch, located at 1961 Centre Street.
  • Award-winning, New York Times bestselling author Kelly Barnhill discusses her short fiction collection Dreadful Young Ladies: And Other Stories, which features bold, reality-bending fantasy. The program is moderated by Gregory Maguire, author of Wicked and Hiddensee. Tuesday, March 6, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Michael Brophy explores the origins and intentions of the orphan train movement as part of the larger immigrant experience in his talk “The Orphan Train Movement: History, Genealogy, Legacy” on Wednesday, March 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • In Search of a Prophet is a journey through the all-embracing spirituality of Kahlil Gibran, author of the bestselling book The Prophet. Paul-Gordon Chandler explores this beloved writer, poet-artist, mystic, and unparalleled guide in the midst of today’s global challenges. Thursday, March 8, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Ted Scheinman, the son of a devoted Jane Austen scholar, discusses his work Camp Austen: My Life as an Accidental Jane Austen Superfan on Monday, March 12, at 6 p.m. in the Newsfeed Café at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • David Hernández addresses the racial treatment of Latina/o immigrants and communities through the lens of immigration enforcement politics from 1790 to today on Thursday, March 15, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • John Schnelle shows attendees how to use the Irish Valuation Office Field Books to paint a detailed picture of the lives of their ancestors, including the limitations, possibilities, and hard realities they faced on Wednesday, March 21, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local & Family History Series.
  • Award-winning author Junot Díaz reads from his first book for children, Islandborn, a picture book celebrating memory and imagination through the eyes of a young girl who imagines a colorful journey back to her Island birthplace. A Q&A will follow. Sunday, March 25, at 2 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Díaz also visits the Connolly Branch on Monday, March 26, at 1 p.m., located at 433 Centre Street in Jamaica Plain.
  • Joseph Rosenbloom shares insights from his book Redemption, an intimate look at the last fateful hours of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life, and will be joined in conversation by Boston Globe opinion columnist Renee Graham on Tuesday, March 27, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Terry Tempest Williams examines our moral responsibility as stewards of the earth, and each other, in her Lowell Lecture Series presentation on Thursday, March 29, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

Read more »

Boston Public Library’s School Vacation Week Programming

Posted on February 13th, 2018 by rlavery in General

This February Vacation Week (February 20 – 23), Boston Public Library locations across the city host a variety of entertaining and educational programs funded by the Highland Street Foundation and with support from Boston Public Library donors. Children and families can enjoy a fun and funny concert by Matt Heaton, an interactive show about bubbles with Mike the Bubble Man, an educational, Brazilian-influenced concert from Sulinha’s Trio, and a musical retelling of Hansel and Gretel from the Boston Lyric Opera. For a complete list of offerings, locations, and dates across the city, visit www.bpl.org/calendar.

Boston Centers for Youth & Families’ community centers across the city additionally host special programming during February Vacation Week, which can be viewed via www.boston.gov/bcyf.

“We are thrilled to collaborate with the Highland Street Foundation on this program series for the second year in a row, ensuring a break from the classroom can be both educational and entertaining,” said Farouqua Abuzeit, Boston Public Library’s Youth Services Manager.

Program Descriptions:

Concerts with Matt Heaton: Children and their families will enjoy an entertaining concert by Matt Heaton. Matt’s songs are a mix of rockabilly, surf, American roots, and Irish traditional music, delivered with a sense of humor and sincere sense of fun. View dates and locations here.

Mike the Bubble Man: Mike the Bubble Man brings magic and science to the stage with this interactive show about bubbles. Through music, choreography, and comedy, bubbles — in all different shapes and sizes — come alive, sparking imagination and wonder. A love for bubbles is never outgrown, especially when there’s a chance to see the world from inside of one. View dates and locations here.

Hansel and Gretel with Boston Lyric Opera:  Join Boston Lyric Opera to learn how they bring the story of Hansel and Gretel to life through music, acting, and movement. Two professional singers, a pianist, and a teaching artist engage audiences in this interactive introduction to opera through a one-hour retelling of the Brothers Grimm classic fairytale. Ideal for youth ages 6-12. View dates and locations here.

Concert with Sulinha’s Trio: You will hear Itzy Bitzy Spider in a Bossa Nova beat, as well as many original songs with topics such as counting, the four seasons, elephants, and many other interactive and dancing songs. Children will be introduced to traditional instruments from Brazil such as Berimbau, Cuica, Pandeiro, and Surdo. View dates and locations here.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Mayor Walsh, Community Members Celebrate Opening of Chinatown Boston Public Library

Posted on February 5th, 2018 by rlavery in Media Releases

Mayor photo

Mayor Martin J. Walsh and library community members today celebrated the opening of Boston Public Library Chinatown at 2 Boylston Street in the China Trade Center. The event marked the return of library services to the neighborhood for the first time in more than 50 years, and a $1 million investment in library services in Chinatown. Regular library hours will begin on Monday, February 5, at 10 a.m.

“I’m so proud that today fulfills our promise to the Chinatown community, and brings library services back to this neighborhood for all to enjoy,” said Mayor Walsh. “So many Chinatown residents have waited decades for this day, and the opening of this space marks our commitment to ensuring all neighborhoods have the resources and support they need. I look forward to residents benefitting from this space and services.”

In his 2017 State of City address, Mayor Walsh pledged to bring library services back to Chinatown. The location will operate for three to five years while plans for long-term library services in Chinatown are developed. Planning firm Miller Dyer Spears worked with the Boston Public Library (BPL), the Mayor’s Office of Neighborhood Services and the community to develop long-term requirements for a library services program in the neighborhood. Their completed planning study is available here. Read more »