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Boston Public Library Announces January-May 2017 Author Talks, Lowell Lecture Series

Posted on January 10th, 2017 by rlavery in General

bpl-brochure-author-talks-wint-spring-2017-r12digitalopt-1Boston Public Library’s January – May 2017 Author Talks and Lowell Lecture Series begin this month, featuring an array of talented writers and topics, highlighted by award-winning and bestselling authors Neil Gaiman and Colum McCann. Hear authors read from their books, purchase a copy and have it signed, and learn about the creative process that gets such magnificent stories told. The 2016 – 2017 Lowell Lectures Series commemorates William Shakespeare in the 400th anniversary year of his death and features transformative coming-of-age authors. All talks and lectures are free and open to the public, and are held at the Central Library in Copley Square, 700 Boylston St, Boston, MA 02116.

“We are extremely pleased to welcome so many notable authors in the first half of 2017 and are grateful to the Lowell Institute for their collaboration; we look forward to what promises to be a season of compelling and thoughtful talks and lectures,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

For full event descriptions, visit http://www.bpl.org/programs/author_series.htm.

Full schedule:

Tuesday, January 24 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Julie Rodriguez and Piotr Kaczmarek, author of Visualizing Financial Data

 

Thursday, January 26 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

David Grinspoon, author of Earth in Human Hands: Shaping Our Planet’s Future

 

Thursday, February 2 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Twists, Turns, and Double Crosses: Boston Thriller Writers Hank Phillippi Ryan and Peter Swanson

 

Wednesday, February 22 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Christina Baker Kline, author of Piece of the World  

 

Tuesday, February 28 ● 6:30 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Romance Fiction Panel with Eloisa James, Lauren Willig, and Sarah MacLean

Moderated by Caroline Linden, author of Six Degrees of Scandal

 

Thursday, March 2 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Joseph Luzzi: From Twain to Toni Morrison—A Literary Journey through America

 

Monday, March 6 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Nicole Galland: The Play’s the Thing—Shakespeare on Stage

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Thursday, March 16 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Kate Clifford Larson: Harriet Tubman, Mary Surratt, and Rosemary Kennedy

Wednesday, March 22 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Reginald Dwayne Betts: An Evening of Poetry

 

Tuesday, March 28 ● 6:30 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Noam Maggor, author of Brahmin Capitalism: Frontiers of Wealth and Populism in America’s First Gilded Age

 

Tuesday, April 4 ● 6 p.m.
Rabb Hall, Central Library
Lowell Lecture Series – Neil Gaiman, author
Moderated by Jared Bowen, Executive Arts Editor for WGBH
*Requires event sign up

 

Thursday, April 6 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Marjorie Garber: Desperately Seeking Shakespeare

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Wednesday, April 12 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Colum McCann, author of Letters to a Young Writer

 

Wednesday, May 3 ● 6 p.m.

Rabb Hall, Central Library

Lowell Lecture Series – Ken Ludwig, author of How to Teach Your Children Shakespeare

Presented as part of All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library

 

Thursday, May 11 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Richard Taylor, author of Martha’s Vineyard: Race, Property, and the Power of Place

 

Tuesday, May 16 ● 6 p.m.

Commonwealth Salon, Central Library

Dr. James O’Connell, author of Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor

 

About the LOWELL LECTURE SERIES

The Lowell Institute has sponsored free public lectures and other educational programs throughout the Boston area since its founding in 1836 by businessman John Lowell, Jr. Over the decades thousands of members of the Boston community have attended Lowell lectures on topics ranging from science to the arts to humanities, from literature to politics to world affairs. The Lowell Institute’s mission since its inception—to inform the populace regardless of gender, race or economic status—has led to the establishment of other great Boston institutions, including the Harvard Extension School and WGBH. Today, the Institute continues to pioneer education and fund innovative projects such as the current expansion of the Lowell Institute School at Northeastern, which was recently awarded a “First in the World” grant for innovative educational programming by the Department of Education. To this day, the Lowell Institute continues to provide a wide variety of free public lectures and educational programming throughout the city of Boston.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Brendan Kiely, Jason Reynolds, and Boston Public Library Visit DYS

Posted on October 28th, 2016 by awilliams in General

keily-and-reynolds-2

Brendan Kiely and Jason Reynolds speak youth in the DYS residential programs in Dorchester.

Boston Public Library’s partnership with the Massachusetts juvenile justice agency, the Department of Youth Services (DYS), is one of the key ways that BPL helps connect people of all ages and backgrounds with books that reflect their lived experiences. As part of these outreach efforts at DYS, on Wednesday, October 5th the Boston Public Library brought Brendan Kiely and Jason Reynolds, coauthors of the young adult book All American Boys, which examines police brutality from the perspective of two characters, to speak to youth in the DYS residential programs in Dorchester.

Kiely and Reynolds met with two groups of DYS youth to discuss how and why All American Boys, a 2016 Coretta Scott King Author Honor book, came to be. Jason Reynolds, recently short-listed for the National Book Award for Ghost, wrote about Rashad, a black teen who experiences violence at the hands of a cop. Kiely, author of The Last True Love Story and The Gospel of Winter, contributed the sections featuring Quinn, Rashad’s white classmate who witnesses the incident.

The book has roots in the authors’ own experiences and perspectives. When he was a teenager in Washington, D.C., Reynolds explained, he and three other black friends were pulled over by a cop for running a yellow light. When one of his friends opened the car door to hand the cop the registration, the cop pointed a gun at them. Four more cop cars pulled up, and the officers ordered the boys out of the car, handcuffed them, and searched the car. After the cops finally let them go, Reynolds and his friends never talked about the incident – for them, Reynolds said, there was nothing unusual about it. Kiely explained that growing up as a white kid in the Boston area, he didn’t have the same experiences as Reynolds, and he created Quinn because he wants people like him to understand that police encounters like the ones described in the book actually happen.

keily-and-reynolds-1The DYS youth had plenty of questions for the authors. In response to a boy who asked what it takes to write a book, Reynolds replied “Discipline.” Another asked how they chose the title for the book, and Kiely and Reynolds said that they wanted to show that the character of Rashad is as much of a typical American as Quinn. Reynolds added that his one objection to the title is that it leaves out girls; he said that women have always been the backbone of change in America, and the book’s strong female characters reflect that.

In addition to bringing authors to DYS, BPL’s teen and youth librarians make monthly trips to the residential facility to give book talks and make books available for the youth to borrow. The youth can also request books, and the librarian will bring them on the next visit.

“Our partnership with DYS helps connect the youth residents to books with characters and experiences they can identify with,” says Jessi Snow, Central Teen Services Team Leader. “Talks with such notable authors as Brendan Kiely and Jason Reynolds get DYS youth excited about reading.”

Other Boston Public Library outreach initiatives for children and teens include visits to Boston’s Children’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, where youth librarians read to patients and introduce teen parents to the BPL’s many free resources related to children and literacy.

Ted Reinstein and the “Feud of First Flight”

Posted on September 28th, 2016 by awilliams in General

img_0658“Feuds are fascinating, unless they are yours,” Ted Reinstein declared to the audience filling the Central Library in Copley Square’s Abbey Room on the night of September 27. Reinstein’s new book Wicked Pissed: New England’s Most Famous Feuds is a testament to this statement, covering everything from sports to politics to literary disputes in the region.

After touching on a variety of New England feuds, including the Red Sox vs. the Yankees, Breed’s Hill vs. Bunker Hill, and a fight between British author Rudyard Kipling and his brother-in-law that drove Kipling from Vermont, Reinstein delved into the “Feud of First Flight.”

Gustave Whitehead, a German immigrant, claimed to have flown a plane in August 1901 in Bridgeport, Connecticut, two years before the Wright brothers flew their plane. Whitehead later downplayed this assertion so as to not draw attention to his uncertain immigration status, and he died penniless. However, thirty years after Whitehead’s supposed flight, the story resurfaced thanks to lawyer and journalist Stella Randolph, who interviewed eye witnesses in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and wrote several subsequent articles and books about Whitehead.

In the 1980s, Reinstein explained, Connecticut asked the Smithsonian, owners of the Wright brothers’ flyer, to investigate Whitehead’s claim, but they refused; Whitehead supporters asserted that this was due to a contract between the Smithsonian and the Wright’s descendants agreeing to acknowledge no one other than the Wright brothers as having achieved first flight. In 1986, a Connecticut teacher built and flew a replica of Whitehead’s plane, garnering national attention for the Whitehead claim. A private detective also found a newspaper article from Bridgeport documenting Whitehead’s flight along with potential photographic evidence.

Reinstein said that in 2013, the aviation publication Jane’s published an opinion piece declaring Whitehead the first person to fly a plane, triggering Connecticut to pass a resolution that recognizes the state as first in flight. In response, Ohio, home of the Wright brothers, passed its own resolution rejecting Connecticut’s claim.

After relaying the story of the Feud of First Flight, Reinstein noted that his book also explores Edgar Allan Poe’s hatred of Boston.

Our next lecture, part of our Local and Family History Series, is Wednesday, September 28, at 6 p.m. in the Central Library’s Commonwealth Salon and features Stephen T. Moskey, author of Larz and Isabel Anderson: Wealth and Celebrity in the Gilded Age.

Stacy Schiff Explores “The Witches: Salem, 1692” at the Central Library

Posted on September 21st, 2016 by awilliams in General

lowresAuthor Stacy Schiff visited the Boston Public Library’s Central Library in Copley Square on Tuesday, September 21, to discuss her latest book, The Witches: Salem, 1692, with help from moderator Brenton Simons, President and CEO of the New England Historic Genealogical Society. The nonfiction book examines the social, political, and legal landscape of the Salem witch hysteria, an ordeal that began in late winter 1692 and ended nine months later.

Schiff, who joked that she came to Boston from New York City via broom, explained that a variety of political and historical factors—including the recent King Philip’s War and the coup of Massachusetts governor Edmund Andros—contributed to an environment of fear and paranoia in 1692 Salem. It was in this unstable landscape that the first witchcraft accusations emerged after two pre-adolescent girls in the home of town minister Samuel Parris began to act strangely. Soon, other teenage girls throughout the town began to shriek and writhe, and accusations of witchcraft were leveled against everyone from a beggar woman to one of the wealthiest merchants in Salem.

Schiff explained that unlike the modern-day conception of a witch with a pointy hat and broomstick, a 17th-century witch was a religious figure, a colleague of the devil viewed as a very real threat. Witches, she said, were a way to explain everything from a misplaced item to the death of a family member—they helped explain the unexplainable. She added that accusing someone of witchcraft was also a convenient way to retaliate against an enemy.

A 17th-century court room, Schiff said, was already a rowdy place; the shrieking girls who filled Salem’s courtroom as evidence of witchcraft only added to the chaos and confusion. The accused soon learned that they could save their lives by confessing and in turn pointing a finger at a neighbor. By August of 1692, everyone on trial was confessing to witchcraft. When the hysteria ended, Schiff noted, a veil of silence fell over the trials and records were destroyed. As recently as the 1950s, when Arthur Miller visited Salem for research for The Crucible, residents were reluctant to discuss the trials.

In response to Simons’ question about possible causes for the hysteria, Schiff dismissed the old theory of poisoning by ergot—a fungus found in rye that causes hallucinations—as not possible for a variety of reasons; instead, she believes trauma resulting from King Philip’s War was a contributing factor. The brutal conflict between the colonists and Native Americans had ended about fifteen years before the trials, and everyone in Salem knew someone who had died or was a captive.

Before concluding with a question and answer session, Simons pointed out that, thanks to an invitation from the New England Historic Genealogical society, a number of the night’s audience members were descendants of the accused.

Boston Public Library holds original records from the Salem Witch Trials, including manuscript depositions, as part of our Colonial and Revolutionary Boston Collection of Distinction.

The next Author Talk features Larry Tye, author of Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon, on Thursday, September 22, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall.

Karin Tanabe Discusses “The Gilded Years” at BPL

Posted on September 16th, 2016 by rlavery in General
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img_1869The Gilded Years author Karin Tanabe visited the Central Library on Thursday, September 15 to discuss her historical fiction work, which tells the story of Anita Hemmings, the first black woman to attend and graduate Vassar College by passing as a white woman in the late 1890s. Anita has local ties – she grew up in Roxbury and worked at the Boston Public Library as a cataloguer, and likely met her husband at the BPL. Tanabe is a Vassar alumna and first got the idea for the book in 2014, when she flipped through her alumni magazine and saw mention of Anita. She began researching the woman and quickly found that not too much information could be found, but the subject of her next book was quickly brewing in her head.

Tanabe and some of her friends visited Vassar to search through their archives to find correspondence and details about Anita Hemmings. She was active in school, a member of the debate club and choir, and a very intelligent woman. Though no “majors” existed at Vassar at the time, Anita focused on languages and wanted to be a teacher. The year after she graduated, her college roommate of two years leaked the news that she was an African-American woman after her suspicions were raised in their senior year. After college, Anita married and lived with her husband in Tennessee before relocated to New York City. Anita did not pursue a teaching career after marrying and having children.

A question and answer period followed the reading of a passage. Audience members were curious to know if Anita was related to Peter or Sally Hemmings (maybe), and if Tanabe had communicated with any of Anita’s ancestors; Tanabe has been in touch with Anita’s great granddaughter. Listeners also asked if Anita was involved in civil rights issues, and Tanabe said she was not, to her knowledge, but Anita had a best friend who went to Wellesley College who was. One of the most challenging aspects of writing this book, Tanabe said, was tracking down the name of Anita’s roommate; she wrote most of the book without knowing. Tanabe also discussed how the book has relevance today, as racial tensions and acceptance of others is still an issue more than 100 years later.

Tanabe concluded the talk by signing books and showing photographs of Anita and others related to The Gilded Years.

The next Author Talk is Tuesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, featuring Stacy Schiff, author of The Witches: Salem, 1692.