Press Room

Category Archives: Media Releases

Boston Public Library: Partnership Opportunities Open at the Central Library and the Branches

Posted on January 16th, 2018 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library seeks community organizations, institutions, and individuals to partner with on adult and youth programming for the Central Library in Copley Square and the twenty-five neighborhood locations during Fiscal Year 2019 (July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019). Program proposals should be in support of the Library’s activities, collections, and strategic plan with a focus on one or more of the following themes: social justice, racial equity, arts & culture, education, immigration, and civic engagement. The BPL hosts more than 12,500 free programs per year for all ages.

“Providing free engaging and enriching programming for patrons and visitors is a core Boston Public Library service, and we look forward to reviewing thoughtful proposals from organizations and individuals as we further develop our dynamic, diverse offerings,” said Michael Colford, Boston Public Library Director of Library Services.

The program partner application can be found via www.bpl.org/programs/programs.htm, and proposals are due January 29, 2018. Organizations should expect to be notified of a decision by mid-February 2018. Existing 2017-2018 partners include the Boston Lyric Opera, Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, GrubStreet, and Writers without Margins. View www.bpl.org/calendar for specific program offerings.

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-five branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

###

 

Boston Public Library Announces 2018 Lowell Lecture Series Speaking Up, Speaking Out: Voices of Social Justice

Posted on January 11th, 2018 by rlavery in Media Releases

lowell2Winter/spring Author Talks, Local & Family History Lecture Series also begin this month at the Central Library in Copley Square

Boston Public Library kicks off 2018 with its 2018 Lowell Lecture Series – Speaking Up, Speaking Out: Voices of Social Justice, exploring social justice issues relevant to today’s world with activists including internationally known transgender speaker Ryan Sallans and Bernice A. King, the daughter of Coretta Scott King and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Winter/spring Author Talks at the Central Library in Copley Square run through April and include a Romance Author Panel and a visit from actress and director Christine Lahti. The first event tonight at 6 p.m. features A. J. Finn, author of the thriller The Woman in the Window. Author visits this month at branches include the North End, Jamaica Plain, and West Roxbury. All programs are free and can be viewed via www.bpl.org/calendar.

The Local & Family History Lecture Series returns and includes such topics as Boston activism in the 60s and the East Boston Immigration Center Project. An overview of how to research your ancestor’s World War I service opens the series on Wednesday, January 24, at 6 p.m. Read more »

Boston Public Library’s Top Borrowed Titles of 2017

Posted on December 20th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

top titlesBoston Public Library’s top borrowed adult titles of 2017 feature a range of acclaimed, prize-winning, and bestselling works by talented writers.

“Bostonians continue to value staying up to date with popular media and culture; three of our top ten books were recently adapted to film or television, while Hillbilly Elegy addresses current political and social issues,” said Jessica Tackett MacDonald, Collection Development Librarian. “Cardholders also love a good Pulitzer Prize winner: The Underground Railroad, All the Light We Cannot See, and The Goldfinch were all given this honor.”

Top Borrowed Adult Titles:

  1. The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
  2. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
  3. The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead
  4. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance
  5. A Man Called Ove by Frederik Backman
  6. Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty
  7. The Girls by Emma Cline
  8. Commonwealth by Ann Patchett
  9. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  10. All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Read more »

Boston Public Library December Author Talks

Posted on November 30th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s December literary events feature topics such as local history, Marshmallow Fluff, all things culinary, and more. Additionally this month, the Library is offering a variety of festive holiday programs for youth and families throughout the system. All can be viewed via www.bpl.org/calendar.

  • Prolific Pan-African author S.A. “Sunny” Abakwue discusses his work and his experiences as an author on Saturday, December 2, at 3 p.m. at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester.
  • Local author and historian Anthony Sammarco details the fascinating history of Boston’s first department store in his new book, Jordan Marsh: New England’s Largest Store on Monday, December 4, at 6:30 p.m. at the South Boston Branch, and describes Christmas traditions of Boston historically on Tuesday, December 5, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Jody Adams, a James Beard award-winning chef and cookbook author, speaks about her career on Tuesday, December 5, at 6 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street.
  • Marshmallow Fluff was invented in Somerville and has been manufactured in Lynn since the 1950s. In celebration of Marshmallow Fluff’s centennial, Mimi Graney, author of Fluff: The Sticky Sweet Story of an American Icon, presents a fascinating narrative of Boston’s forgotten candy industry on Wednesday, December 6, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Jessica Keener discusses her novel Strangers in Budapest on Thursday, December 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square. The talk will be moderated by author Risa Miller.
  • Joe Bagley, City of Boston Archaeologist, shares his findings and discoveries throughout the City on Thursday, December 7, at 6:30 p.m. at the Roslindale Branch, located at 4238 Washington Street.
  • Joan M. Blake reads from her book Rise up: How to Overcome Your Battles Utilizing Faith and Belief in God on Saturday, December 9, at 2 p.m. at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester.
  • Boston Globe reporter Emily Sweeney profiles Boston’s notorious criminals in Gangland Boston and discusses her work on Monday, December 11, at 6:30 p.m. at the Adams Street Branch, located at 690 Adams Street in Dorchester.
  • Brian Clements, Alexandra Teague, and Dean Rader, editors of Bullets into Bells: Poets & Citizens Respond to Gun Violence discuss the work, which brings together poems by dozens of the country’s best poets, and are joined by contributing poets and citizen responders on Wednesday, December 13, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Local Jamaica Plain authors Amy Hoffman and Michelle Gabow discuss their works; Hoffman, known for her nonfiction writing, will read from The Off Season, her first novel, and Gabow, a playwright and actor, reads from God is a Dog, a collection of short stories. Thursday, December 14, at 6 p.m. at the Jamaica Plain Branch at 30 South Street.
  • Anthony Sammarco gives an intriguing history of Boston’s libraries and how the Brighton Branch came to be on Monday, December 18, at 6:30 p.m. at the Brighton Branch, located at 40 Academy Hill Road.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY

Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

###

 

November Author Talks and Lectures

Posted on October 25th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s November author talks and lectures include events across the system featuring topics such as crime, local art and history, immigration, and more:

  • In Shallow Graves: The Hunt for the New Bedford Highway Serial Killer, investigative reporter and award-winning journalist Maureen Boyle tells the story of a case that has haunted New England for forty years and shares excerpts from her work on Thursday, November 2, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Neil Swidey, a staff writer for Boston Globe Magazine, discusses the uncanny connections between the Trump administration’s anti-immigration rhetoric and the playbook crafted a century ago by a small group of Harvard-educated Boston Brahmin. Thursday, November 2, at 6:30 p.m. at the West End Branch, located at 151 Cambridge Street. This program is sponsored by the Boston Public Library’s Baxter Fund, which promotes programs that will further the commemorative and public understanding of the history of the settlement of and immigration to New England.
  • Paul Lewis, author of A is for Asteroids, Z is for Zombies: A Bedtime Book about the Coming Apocalypse discusses global threats in the spirit of taking these threats seriously while also finding relief from the anxiety they provoke on Saturday, November 4, at 3:30 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Local writer Larry Spotted Crow Mann gives a talk about current issues affecting the Native American community today and discusses his latest book, Drumming and Dreaming: A Collection of Nipmuc Legends on Thursday, November 9, at 6:30 p.m. at the Roslindale Branch, located at 4246 Washington Street.
  • Christine Verret spent five years traveling around greater Boston photographing over 420 murals and compiled them in a new book, Boston Murals. She discusses her adventures and shows slides of these colorful additions to the Boston cityscape on Monday, November 13, at 6 p.m. at the Connolly Branch, located at 433 Centre Street in Jamaica Plain.
  • Rosalyn Delores Elder’s book African American Heritage in Massachusetts—Exploring the Legacy: Places and Spaces of Significance tours 741 sites in towns across the Commonwealth that document the contributions of African Americans to our state’s history. Wednesday, November 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local and Family History Series.
  • Author and historian Anthony Sammarco reveals the fascinating history of Boston’s beloved Jordan Marsh department store on Thursday, November 16, at 6:30 p.m. at the Brighton Branch, located at 40 Academy Hill Road.
  • Boston Ballerina is both a memoir of Laura Young’s personal journey and a fascinating account of Boston Ballet’s rise from a regional troupe to the internationally recognized company that it is today. Thursday, November 16 at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Laura Erickson-Schroth, MD, and Laura Jacobs, LCSW-R, authors of You’re in the Wrong Bathroom! And 20 Other Myths and Misconceptions about Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming People discuss their work on Saturday, November 18, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Local author Stephanie Schorow speaks about her book The Cocoanut Grove Fire and commemorates its 75th anniversary this year on Tuesday, November 28, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. Part of the Local and Family History Series.
  • Sam Allis, Time Magazine‘s former Rome bureau chief, reads from his new historical novel A Hero of Two Worlds on Tuesday, November 28, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes Series.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

###