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Boston Public Library’s Free Homework Help Begins September 18

Posted on September 14th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

September marks national Library Card Sign-up Month; educational resources and services await new cardholders

Boston Public Library’s free Homework Help program begins September 18 and runs through May 24, 2018, offering free afterschool help and mentorship provided by high-achieving high school students at most BPL locations across the city. The program, offered Monday through Thursday from 3:30 -5:30 p.m. is open to students in grades K-8; no registration required. Boston Teacher’s Union (BTU) tutors are also available during select weekdays from 4-6 p.m. for students in grades K-12. Visit www.bpl.org/homework for complete information. Most homework help mentors and program participants are Boston Public Schools students, though it is open to all, and BTU tutors are either current or retired Boston Public Schools teachers.

As September marks the return of the academic year and a month many new residents move to Boston, Boston Public Library reminds all during national Library Card Sign-up Month that anyone who lives, works, or goes to school in Massachusetts can have a Boston Public Library card.

“The startup of BPL’s Homework Help program marks back-to-school time at the library. We are here for Boston’s young people to support learning in a safe, welcoming environment, and again we are immensely grateful to Harvard University for their training of the high school mentors who run the program across the city,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. “September is also Library Card Sign-up Month and we welcome all new residents, students, and visitors with an invitation to check out the library in Copley Square and across the city’s neighborhoods. “ Read more »

Boston Public Library’s Local & Family History Lecture Series Fall Schedule

Posted on September 5th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Boston Public Library’s Local & Family History Lecture Series returns this month, offering information about the history of Boston and its diverse neighborhoods along with tips and guides for those beginning their own genealogical research. The complete September through December schedule can be viewed or downloaded online. The series offers a wide range of topics, from the Cocoanut Grove Fire to the history of Marshmallow Fluff’s production in Massachusetts:

  • Eve LaPlante discusses how Puritans viewed women’s power and women’s bodies, in this life and in the afterlife in “Monstrous Births, Powerful Midwives: The Battle Over Women’s Bodies in 17th-Century Boston” on Wednesday, September 13, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Steven Edson and Dan Gilman share their knowledge to help you preserve your family’s history before it’s lost or forgotten. Discover how to scan and restore old photographs, transfer paper to digital formats, convert old film to video, record interviews with relatives, and learn best practices for editing, storytelling, and sharing your family’s memories on Wednesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Margaret Newell, author and vice chair of the History Department at Ohio State University, explores the stories of Indians enslaved by English colonists in New England and shows how they influenced New England society in crucial ways, including by exposing their captors to Native religion, foods, and technology and fighting for citizenship in cases that had implications for all enslaved peoples in 18th-century America. Wednesday, October 4, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Lisa Berenson, director of Educational Programming and Development at the Jewish Cemetery Association of Massachusetts, discusses an ambitious initiative to transform and restore a former Jewish mortuary chapel in East Boston into a state-of-the-art exhibit hall on the history of immigration in the Boston area. Wednesday, October 25, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • David Allen Lambert, chief genealogist of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, shows you how, despite challenges, you can start reconstructing your ancestor’s service history using draft registration cards and enlistments, the U.S. census, discharge papers, unit histories, and several other resources on Wednesday, November 8, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Rosalyn Delores Elder, author, registered architect, and cofounder of Jamaicaway Books, explores sites in towns across the commonwealth that document the contributions of African Americans to our state’s history on Wednesday, November 15, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Stephanie Schorow, author of six books including The Cocoanut Grove Fire and Drinking Boston: A History of the City and Its Spirits, explores the worst nightclub fire in U.S. history in its 75th anniversary year, in which 492 people perished on Tuesday, November 28, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Marshmallow Fluff was invented in Somerville and has been manufactured in Lynn since the 1950s. In celebration of Marshmallow Fluff’s centennial, Mimi Graney, author of Fluff: The Sticky Sweet Story of an American Icon, presents a fascinating narrative of Boston’s forgotten candy industry on Wednesday, December 6, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.

 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

 

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Boston Public Library’s September Author Talks and Lectures

Posted on August 30th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

fall talksSeptember begins Boston Public Library’s robust fall author talk series running through December, highlighted this month by Nancy Pearl, Robert McKee, bestselling romance authors, and the 2017 Druker Lecture by acclaimed fashion designer Joseph Abboud. The September-December Fall Author Talks & Lectures at the Central Library brochure can be viewed or downloaded online and will be available in early September at the Central Library in Copley Square.

Author talks and lectures at all Boston Public Library locations in September:

  • In her recently published guide, Une Québécoise à Boston, Marie-Josée Duquette draws on her experience, offering tips to readers about the culture, sports, and culinary delights Boston provides. Thursday, September 7, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • In honor of Grandparents Day, award-winning author and storyteller Irene Smalls shares her stories on Saturday, September 9, at 2 p.m. at the Dudley Branch, located at 65 Warren Street in Roxbury.
  • NPR books commentator and librarian Nancy Pearl discusses her debut novel about an unlikely marriage at a crossroads – George and Lizzie is an intimate story of new and past loves, the scars of childhood, and an imperfect marriage at its defining moment. Tuesday, September 12, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • South End poet and historian Lynne Potts reads from her new book Faces of a Neighborhood: Boston’s South End in the Early 21st Century on Tuesday, September 12, at 6:30 p.m. at the South End Branch, located at 685 Tremont Street. Part of the South End Writes series.
  • A romance panel titled “Beyond Mr. Darcy: New Markets in Romance” features bestselling authors and romance genre experts Damon Suede, Farrah Rochon, and Sarina Bowen on Thursday, September 14, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Local author Janet Britcher presents an overview of her book Zoom Leadership: Change Your Focus Change Your Insights, which offers techniques to draw on the reader’s personal experience and expertise to aide in decision making. Monday, September 18, at 6:30 p.m. at the Hyde Park Branch, located at 35 Harvard Avenue.
  • Conservator Mimi Leveque gives an overview of her work with case studies on individual mummies in relation to her development of an ethical approach to the treatment of human remains, in particular those of ancient Egyptians in her talk “My Life Among the Dead: Developing an Ethical Approach to Mummy Conservation.” Tuesday, September 19, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Robert McKee, Fulbright Scholar and bestselling author, shares “The Primacy of Story” on Wednesday, September 20, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street. McKee’s signature STORY Seminars are held around the globe, with alumni including over 65 Academy Award winners, 250 Emmy Award winners, and 50 Directors Guild of America Award winners.
  • Journalist Lenora Chu offers a rare glimpse inside China’s insular education system, discussing Little Soldiers: An American Boy, a Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve on Saturday, September 23, at 2 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Boston Public Library’s 2017 Druker Lecture features fashion designer and author Joseph Abboud, celebrating urban design and architecture on Wednesday, September 27, at 6 p.m. in Rabb Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Andrew Budson details his book Seven Steps to Managing Your Memory: What’s Normal, What’s Not, and What to Do About It on Thursday, September 28, at 6 p.m. in the Commonwealth Salon at the Central Library in Copley Square, located at 700 Boylston Street.
  • Cornel West discusses and signs copies of the 35th anniversary edition of his book, Prophesy of Deliverance, providing readers a new understanding of the African American experience based largely on his own political and cultural perspectives. A discussion will then be moderated by Dr. Saida Grundy of Boston University on Thursday, September 28, at 6 p.m. at the Grove Hall Branch, located at 41 Geneva Avenue in Dorchester.

Read more »

Boston Public Library’s Read Your Way to Fenway Winners Celebrate at August 27 Red Sox Game

Posted on August 29th, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

Desktop300Boston Public Library’s annual Read Your Way to Fenway summer reading contest concluded as winners celebrated a summer of reading and enjoyed Sunday afternoon’s Red Sox game at Fenway Park vs. the Baltimore Orioles. Youth ages 5-17 were encouraged to read a minimum of three books and write an essay about their favorite for the chance to attend the game; 624 children participated in the program and more than 500 winners were chosen.

The on-field winners, who were part of a pre-game ceremony Sunday afternoon, include Raymond Gonzalez – Mattapan Branch, Jamie Fulton – Uphams Corner Branch, Annika Joyce Meyer – Honan Allston Branch, and Anand Koulomzin from the Connolly Branch.

“Boston Public Library’s young readers submitted hundreds of thoughtful essays and capped off a summer of learning with one of Boston’s most beloved summertime traditions.  I am grateful to our sponsors for their generous support of this unique summer reading program that further develops reading and literacy skills during out of school time,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. Read more »

Boston Public Library Wins Boston Preservation Alliance Preservation Award for Puvis de Chavannes Mural Restoration

Posted on August 2nd, 2017 by rlavery in Media Releases

chavannesBoston Public Library and a conservation team led by Gianfranco Pocobene has won the Preservation Achievement Award for its restoration of Pierre Puvis de Chavannes’ Philosophy mural panel from the Boston Preservation Alliance, Boston’s primary nonprofit advocacy organization that protects and promotes the use of historic buildings and landscapes. The Library’s McKim building at Copley Square has long been celebrated as a premier art and architecture destination in Boston, and the murals decorating the grand staircase are some of the most photographed objects on any visit.  Artist Pierre Puvis de Chavannes’ Philosophy panel, approximately 14’ x 7’ in size, 160 pounds, and one of nine panels in the artist’s mural cycle, was successfully restored in September 2016 and then returned to its alcove in the grand staircase. This section of the Chavannes’ mural was conserved using a technique that had to be invented for this project and returned to its home after months of careful restoration.

The Boston Preservation Alliance hosts the 2017 Preservation Achievement Awards at Fenway Park on September 19. Boston Public Library also received a BPA award this year for its Central Library Renovation of its Johnson building.

“Boston Public Library is honored to receive this award from the Boston Preservation Alliance, as caring for and preserving all our Special Collections so that they remain accessible, free to all, is one of our utmost responsibilities. This mural is an integral component of the McKim building and viewed and appreciated along with the Sargent and Abbey murals by millions of visitors each year,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library. “Our founders wanted a library that would inspire; and where would we be without Philosophy as a muse?” Read more »