Boston Public Library
Norman B. Leventhal Map Center

1st Floor, McKim Building, Central Library
617-859-2387, maps@bpl.org

Henry Pelham. London, Published according to Act of Parliament, June 2d, 1777.

A Plan of Boston in New England with its Environs, Including Milton, Dorchester, Roxbury, Brooklin, Cambridge, Medford, Charleston, Parts of Malden and Chelsea. With the Military Works Constructed in those Places in the Years 1775, and 1776.

Read more about the Pelham map.

Visit the Normal B. Leventhal Map Center online at their full website and on Facebook Facebook

The Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library, created in 2004, is a nonprofit organization established as a public- private partnership between the Library and philanthropist Norman Leventhal. Its mission is to use the collection of 200,000 maps and 5,000 atlases for the enjoyment and education of all through exhibitions, educational programs, and a website that includes more than 3,700 digitized maps at maps.bpl.org. The map collection is global in scope, dating from the 15th century to the present, with a particular strength in maps and atlases from the New England region, American Revolutionary War period, nautical charts, and world urban centers.

The Leventhal Map Center is located on the first floor of the Library's historic McKim Building in Copley Square. It includes an exhibition gallery that features changing thematic exhibitions, a public learning center with research books and computers, and a reading room for rare map research. Other elements include a world globe three feet in diameter and a Kids Map Club with map puzzles, books and activities.

Educational programs for students in grades K to 12 are offered to school groups on site and in the classroom. More than 100 lesson plans based on national standards are available on the website, and professional development programs for teachers are scheduled regularly throughout the year.

The Leventhal Map Center is ranked among the top ten in the United States for the size of its collection, the significance of its historic (pre-1900) material, and its advanced digitization program. It is unique among the major collections because it also combines these features with exceptional educational programs to advance geographic literacy among students in grades K to 12 and enhance the teaching of subjects from history to mathematics to language arts. The collection is also the second largest in the country located in a public library, ensuring unlimited access to these invaluable resources for scholars, educators, and the general public.

Exhibition Gallery and Learning Center hours

Research Room hours, by appointment only