Teens

Category Archives: Books

On the Radar: Five Books to Check Out in January

Posted on December 30th, 2016 by vkovenmatasy in Books, Previews, Teen Services

Get your library card handy and reserve your place in line for these new January releases! If you place a hold now, they can be in your hands before they even hit the shelf.

Please note: all summaries are taken from the Boston Public Library catalog unless otherwise noted. They may have been edited for length and clarity.

 

City of Saints and Thieves cover

City of Saints and Thieves by Natalie Anderson

Summary: Sixteen-year-old Tina and two friends leave Kenya and slip into the Congo, from where she and her mother fled years before, seeking revenge for her mother’s murder but uncovering startling secrets.

Why We’re Excited: Did you know that the BPL has a Writer in Residence every year? (This year’s writer is Lisa Rosinsky, and the book she’s working on sounds amazing — I can’t wait to read it!) Natalie Anderson was our Writer in Residence in 2014-25, and she wrote City of Saints and Thieves at our very own Copley Library. Even without the local connection, though, it sounds like a tremendously exciting story! I’m very curious to see how Anderson is able to bring her past experience as an aid worker into her book.

 

Devil's Advocate and Agent of Chaos covers

Devil’s Advocate by Jonathan Maberry and Agent of Chaos by Kami Garcia

Summary: In the spring of 1979, fifteen-year-old Dana Scully has bigger problems than being the new girl in school. Dana has always had dreams. Sometimes they’ve even come true. Until now, she tried to write this off as coincidence. But ever since her father’s military career moved the family across the country to Craiger, Maryland, the dreams have been more like visions. Vivid, disturbing, and haunted by a shadowy figure who may be an angel . . . or the devil. When a classmate who recently died in a car accident appears before Dana, her wounds look anything but accidental. Compelled by a force she can’t name, Dana uncovers even more suspicious deaths–and must face the dangerous knowledge that evil is real. But when a betrayal of faith makes her question everything, she begins to put her faith in being a skeptic. / In the spring of 1979, seventeen-year-old Fox Mulder has bigger problems than applying for college. Five years ago, his younger sister disappeared from their home and was never heard from again. Mulder blames himself, and his mother blames his father, who has retreated into his top-secret work for the State Department. In Fox’s senior year, his dad has moved him to Washington, DC–away from his friends on Martha’s Vineyard. While Mulder doesn’t mind the fresh start and not being known as “that kid with the missing sister,” he’s still obsessed with finding Samantha. So when a local boy turns up dead and another child is abducted, Mulder can’t stop himself from getting involved. Could there be a link to his sister’s case? As he uncovers the truth, Mulder and his friends find themselves on the trail of a serial killer. Sucked into a world where conspiracies, the occult, and madness overlap, Fox Mulder starts to believe.

Why We’re Excited: It’s so great to live in the 21st century where pretty much every movie or television franchise gets its own tie-in YA novelization! (I’m not being sarcastic. I grew up devouring the Starfleet Academy novels. If more of my favorite shows and movies had had YA books, I would have been all over that.) I actually managed to miss the X-Files craze the first time it came around, so the new books are a chance for me to get acquainted with Mulder and Scully for the first time — I’ve been assured I’ll love them. Not to mention there are some pretty big name authors attached to the project! You might recognize Kami Garcia from the Southern Gothic series Beautiful Creatures, which she co-wrote with Margaret Stohl, and Jonathan Maberry from his zombie apocalypse thriller Rot & Ruin. Tie-ins have come a long way in the writers department since the Star Trek: The Original Series days…

 

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The March Against Fear by Ann Bausum

Summary: Mississippi. 1966. On a hot June afternoon an African-American man named James Meredith set out to walk through his home state, intending to fight racism and fear with his feet. A seemingly simple plan, but one teeming with risk. Just one day later Meredith was shot and wounded in a roadside ambush. Within twenty-four hours, Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokely Carmichael, and other civil rights leaders had taken up Meredith’s cause, determined to overcome this violent act and complete Meredith’s walk. The stakes were high–there was no time for advance planning and their route cut through dangerous territory. No one knew if they would succeed. By many measures the March Against Fear became one of the greatest protests of the civil rights era. But it was also one of the last, and the campaign has been largely forgotten. Critically acclaimed author Ann Bausum brings this crucial turning point of civil rights history back to life, escorting you along the dusty Mississippi roads where heroic marchers endured violence, rage, and fear as they walked more than 200 miles in the name of equality and justice.

Why We’re Excited: Voter suppression, racial profiling, police brutality, disproportionate incarceration and sentencing… which century are we living in again? But when the lessons of the Civil Rights Movement seem in danger of being forgotten, it’s that much more important to remember their struggles and successes. Ann Bausum — who also wrote Stonewall — picked a frighteningly timely topic for her new book.

 

Our Own Private Universe cover

Our Own Private Universe by Robin Talley

Summary: Fifteen-year-old Aki Simon has a theory. And it’s mostly about sex. No, it isn’t that kind of theory. Aki already knows she’s bisexual–even if, until now, it’s mostly been in the hypothetical sense. Aki has dated only guys so far, and her best friend, Lori, is the only person who knows she likes girls, too. Actually, Aki’s theory is that she’s got only one shot at living an interesting life–and that means she’s got to stop sitting around and thinking so much. It’s time for her to actually do something. Or at least try. So when Aki and Lori set off on a church youth-group trip to a small Mexican town for the summer and Aki meets Christa–slightly older, far more experienced–it seems her theory is prime for the testing. But it’s not going to be easy. For one thing, how exactly do two girls have sex, anyway? And more important, how can you tell if you’re in love? It’s going to be a summer of testing theories–and the result may just be love.

Why We’re Excited: I can’t look at this beautiful cover without thinking of the new edition of Annie on My Mind. I don’t know if that’s intentional, but it’s such a lovely connection to have — Annie on My Mind is about to turn 35, and it’s a pleasure for librarians nowadays to have so many new YA lesbian romances to offer as its spiritual successors. Robin Talley has certainly done her part to contribute to our supply! Lies We Tell Ourselves, What We Left Behind, and As I Descended are all available to check out from the BPL, if you need to catch up!

 

History Is All You Left Me cover

History Is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera

Summary: Secrets are revealed as OCD-afflicted Griffin grieves for his first love, Theo, who died in a drowning accident.

Why We’re Excited: New Adam Silvera book! Sounds like it’ll make you cry every bit as much as More Happy Than Not! Yes, that’s a recommendation!

 

icon of VeronicaDid I get you interested in reading one of these books? Just click the title of the one you want and the link will take you to the relevant page in the catalog. From there you can click the green “Place a Hold” button and you’re all set!

Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow a book? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

 

*”On the Radar” features book previews by Veronica, the Teen Librarian at the Dudley Branch, on the last Tuesday or Friday of every month.

On the Radar: Five Books to Check Out in December

Posted on November 30th, 2016 by vkovenmatasy in Books, Previews, Teen Services

Get your library card handy and reserve your place in line for these new December releases! If you place a hold now, they can be in your hands before they even hit the shelf.

Please note: all summaries are taken from the Boston Public Library catalog unless otherwise noted. They may have been edited for length and clarity.

 

the secret of a heart note cover

The Secret of a Heart Note by Stacey Lee

Summary: Sometimes love is right under your nose. As one of only two aromateurs left on the planet, sixteen-year-old Mimosa knows what her future holds: a lifetime of weeding, mixing love elixirs, and matchmaking–all while remaining incurably alone. For Mim, the rules are clear: falling in love would render her nose useless, taking away her one great talent. Still, Mimosa doesn’t want to spend her life elbow-deep in soil and begonias. She dreams of a normal high school experience with friends, sports practices, debate club, and even a boyfriend. But when she accidentally gives an elixir to the wrong woman and has to rely on the lovesick woman’s son, the school soccer star, to help fix the situation, Mim quickly begins to realize that falling in love isn’t always a choice you can make.

Why We’re Excited: Stacey Lee, author of Under a Painted Sky (aka the only cowboy book you will ever need to read, no seriously, go read it) and Outrun the Moon (ladies being friends! cool history you never learned in school! the San Francisco Earthquake!) is branching out into magical realism? Be still my heart. I mean, go on and put yourself on the hold list, but you won’t be first in line, because I already am. ♥ ♥ ♥ Stacey Lee ♥ ♥ ♥

 

invisible enemies and invisible allies covers

Invisible Enemies and Invisible Allies by Jeanette Farrell

Summary: In Invisible Enemies, Jeanette Farrell tells the gripping stories of mankind’s struggles against deadliest diseases in human history–including malaria, leprosy and cholera–updated to reflect new medical and social developments such as the continuing ravages of AIDS around the world, the bioterror threat posed by smallpox eradication, and an all-new chapter on the Ebola crisis. Illustrated with more than fifty reproductions of photographs, newspaper cartoons, public health posters, and the like, Invisible Enemies is an intense and intriguing mix of history, biography, and biology. / Although we are accustomed to equating the presence of microbes with disease, in fact most microbes play a vital “friendly” role in shaping our lives. It is not just that one hundred million microbes can populate a thimbleful of fertile soil, or that many millions live happily in as much of our saliva. Microbes are everywhere, and we could not survive without them. In Invisible Allies, Jeanette Farrell considers the invisible bugs essential to an everyday event: the eating of a light lunch consisting of a cheese sandwich and a chocolate bar. Microbes create such a lunch, digest it, and, through the alchemy of decomposition, transform it so that the cycle can start all over again. In the course of her eye-opening narrative, Dr. Farrell relates the historical significance of using microbes to preserve foods, our long-standing ambivalence about the microbes that live on and in us, and our growing understanding of their importance.

Why We’re Excited: Science is so cool! And so gross! Whether you like learning about diseases that can kill you (in which case I also recommend Red MadnessBubonic Panic and Fatal Fever) or the teeny-tiny organisms that make cheese possible (and a lot of other things, but I want to stress the most important one: CHEESE), we’ve got a book for you.

 

quicks cover

Quicks by Kevin Waltman

Summary: Marion High, an inner-city school in Indianapolis, has never had a state championship. It’s D-Bow’s Senior Year, his A-Game is ready, big-time colleges are taking notice, and he’s dreaming big. What’s rattling D-Bow is the cocky white guy, Daryl. He wants D-Bow’s job at point. It’s time for D-Bow to man up. He needs to be the team leader, and he needs to bring that A-Game.

Why We’re Excited: Now that the NBA and NCAA seasons are underway, we’re going to need a good basketball book to read during timeouts. Quicks is the fourth and final book in the High School Hoops series, following Next, Slump, and Pull; each one chronicles a year in the high school career of Derrick Bowen.

 

ever the hunted cover

Ever the Hunted by Erin Summerill

Summary: Seventeen year-old Britta Flannery is the outcast daughter of a bounty hunter who must use her powers to track her father’s killer in a world of warring kingdoms and dangerous magic.

Why We’re Excited: I know, I know, you’re all tired of hearing about how some book is “the next Hunger Games.” And honestly, Ever the Hunted doesn’t sound much like The Hunger Games at all. That said, Britta sounds like a heroine that readers who loved Katniss Everdeen can get behind. And if you loved Kristin Cashore’s Graceling, I hear you’ll probably like this book too.

 

did i mention i miss you cover

Did I Mention I Miss You? by Estelle Maskame

Summary: It’s been a year since Eden last spoke to Tyler. A year since he left her all alone after nearly destroying their family. But Eden picked herself up and headed to Chicago for college. She’s moved on… hasn’t she? Despite their break-up, Tyler’s determined to rekindle what they once had. He’s headed back to Santa Monica, where Eden is spending her summer. Eden’s not sure she can forgive him. But when a tragedy draws them together, Eden must search her heart and decide if Tyler is worth the risk once and for all.

Why We’re Excited: So I’ve been hearing a lot about Wattpad lately… okay, yes, if by lately you mean “for the past few years”, I’m not that far behind the curve. But I’m seeing more and more traditionally published books that openly advertise originally having been posted on Wattpad (check out After and Before by Anna Todd, My Life With the Walter Boys by Ali Novak, and the prequels to Did I Mention I Miss You?, Did I Mention I Love You? and Did I Mention I Need You?), and if you’re anything like me, you might want to find out what all the fuss is about! The DIMILY trilogy, now that it’s complete, looks like a good place to start.

 

icon of VeronicaDid I get you interested in reading one of these books? Just click the title of the one you want and the link will take you to the relevant page in the catalog. From there you can click the green “Place a Hold” button and you’re all set!

Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow a book? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

 

*”On the Radar” features book previews by Veronica, the Teen Librarian at the Dudley Branch, on the last Tuesday or Friday of every month.

Curl Up & Read: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily Danforth

Posted on November 4th, 2016 by vkovenmatasy in Books, Reviews - Teens, Teen Services

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Title: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily Danforth

Read by: Snipe, Dudley Branch

Summary: This book is about a girl named Cameron Post discovering her sexuality and realizing she’s a lesbian. Eventually her aunt and grandmother, who are conservative Christians, learn about her being a lesbian and kissing a girl named Coley Tyler and they send her to a conversion therapy camp. She’s forced to stay there for about two years until she escapes with her friends Jane and Adam, who were also at the camp for similar reasons. The whole story is about how conversion therapy is wrong for everybody and it damages youth. It keeps them away from exploring their sexuality and leads to them being confused and having negative outcomes.

Genre/Subgenre: Realistic fiction

Standalone/Series: Standalone

Length: 470 pages

Personal Thoughts:

I thought this book was really good. First off, you can tell it wasn’t written by a straight author, which is really important. You need to get this type of experience and dialogue in your narrative from an actual person who’s gay, not a straight person who just heard these things. It deals with people being confused about their sexuality and I think that’s also an important part of the book, because not everyone just knows they’re gay, or that what they are is what they are. It could be relatable to anyone, especially people in this age range, who are also confused about themselves. One of the major important parts of the books is about conversion therapy, which is where gay kids are sent to learn that they’re bad for being who they are. It goes into how the people that run these camps actually think they’re doing some type of good and believe they’re right in doing this, and how you can’t let these types of people be in charge of children, especially ones who are questioning themselves.

The book uses words like “faggot” a lot to describe gay people, which is obviously a slur now, and it also describes a graphic scene in which a boy cuts himself because of the abuse of his father and feelings of inferiority and self-hatred. If you’re a person who doesn’t deal well with those types of scenes you probably shouldn’t pick this book up, or should at least try to skip that scene. If you read the book, you’ll recognize the part where it begins.

I would give this book an 8 out of 10 and would recommend it especially to people in the LGBT+ community and anyone questioning their gender and/or sexual identities.

 
animated-2Looking to borrow the book mentioned in this post? This link will take you to our catalog:

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow these books? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

 

* “Curl Up & Read” posts book reviews by librarians and teens like you on the first Friday of every month. If you’re a teen and you’re interested in having a book review posted on the Teen Blog, please email vkovenmatasy (at) bpl (dot) org and pitch your idea. We might even be able to hook you up with an Advance Reader’s Copy of something coming out soon, so you can really be ahead of the crowd!

 

On the Radar: Five Books to Check Out in November

Posted on October 28th, 2016 by vkovenmatasy in Books, Previews, Teen Services

Get your library card handy and reserve your place in line for these new November releases! If you place a hold now, they can be in your hands before they even hit the shelf.

Please note: all summaries are taken from the Boston Public Library catalog unless otherwise noted. They may have been edited for length and clarity.

 

my sister rosa cover

My Sister Rosa by Justine Larbalestier

Summary: Seventeen-year-old Aussie Che Taylor loves his younger sister, Rosa. But he’s also certain that she’s a psychopath—clinically, threateningly, dangerously. Recently Rosa has been making trouble, hurting things. Che is the only one who knows; he’s the only one his sister trusts. Rosa is smart, talented, pretty, and very good at hiding what she is and the manipulation she’s capable of. Their parents, whose business takes the family from place to place, brush off the warning signs as Rosa’s “acting out.” Now that they have moved again—from Bangkok to New York City—their new hometown provides far too many opportunities for Rosa to play her increasingly complex and disturbing games. Che’s always been Rosa’s rock, protecting her from the world. Now, the world might need protection from her. (summary via the publisher’s website)

 Why We’re Excited: Ahhhhh this book sounds so scary! But probably in a good way? Larbalestier is a writer who can handle suspense — like everyone else in the book blogosphere, I really admired Liar, although to voice an unpopular opinion I think Team Human, which she cowrote with Sarah Rees Brennan, is even better — and the plot of My Sister Rosa sounds genuinely terrifying. We’ll have to see if I’m brave enough to read the whole thing! (Final note: kudos to whoever designed that cover. It is gorgeous and deeply disturbing.)

 

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Dear My Blank: Secret Letters Never Sent by Emily Trunko (ed.)

Summary: From the popular Tumblr account of the same name comes a collection of heart-warming, tear-jerking, and gut-wrenching anonymous letters that people never intended to, or didn’t have the courage to send. What first started as a Tumblr account with over 30,000 followers, is now a carefully curated collection of 150 anonymous letters covering a range of topics from heartbreak, unrequited love, and loss, to inspiration, self-awareness, and gratitude. Featuring exclusive content not available on Tumblr, these unsent letters are addressed to secret crushes, lost loved ones, boyfriends, siblings, parents, grandparents, and many more. (summary via the publisher’s website)

Why We’re Excited: There’s something addictive about reading anonymous confessions — I was obsessed with PostSecret in high school. And I can’t wait to see the illustrations!

 

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The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

Summary:

Natasha: I’m a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won’t be my story.

Daniel: I’ve always been the good son, the good student, living up to my parents’ high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see her, I forget about all that. Something about Natasha makes me think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store—for both of us.

The Universe: Every moment in our lives has brought us to this single moment. A million futures lie before us. Which one will come true?

(summary via the publisher’s website)

Why We’re Excited: Well, in case you somehow missed the insane popularity of Everything, Everything, Nicola Yoon’s debut hit the stratosphere — #1 on the New York Times Bestseller List, starred reviews from Kirkus and School Library Journal, selected for YALSA’s Best Fiction for Young Adults and Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers. So it’s not surprising that her second novel has some pretty high expectations to live up to. But Yoon (who is also a member of the We Need Diverse Books team, incidentally) has the romance-writing chops to handle the challenge.

 

dear-yvette

Dear Yvette by Ni-Ni Simone

Summary: All sixteen year old Yvette Simmons wanted was to disappear. Problem is: she has too many demons for that. Yvette’s life changed forever after a street fight over a boy ended in a second degree murder charge. Forced to start all over again, she’s sentenced to live in a group home far from anything or anyone she’s ever known. She manages to keep her past hidden, until a local cutie, known as Brooklyn, steps in. Slowly, Yvette lets him into her heart and he gives her the summer of her dreams… But in Yvette’s world things are never as they seem. Brooklyn has a few secrets of his own and Yvette’s past comes back with a vengeance. Will she face life head-on? Will she return to her old ways? Or will an unexpected letter decide her fate? (summary via the publisher’s website)

Why We’re Excited: Ni-Ni Simone never languishes on the shelf! (She’s actually an author I have to keep re-purchasing and re-purchasing, since the teens who check her books out love them too much to bring them back…) The previous installment of the Throwback Diaries, Down By Law, came out over a year ago, and my library’s copy has barely spent a month in the building.

 

heartless

Heartless by Marissa Meyer

Summary: Long before she was the terror of Wonderland, she was just a girl who wanted to fall in love. Catherine may be one of the most desired girls in Wonderland, and a favorite of the unmarried King of Hearts, but her interests lie elsewhere. A talented baker, all she wants is to open a shop with her best friend. But according to her mother, such a goal is unthinkable for the young woman who could be the next queen. Then Cath meets Jest, the handsome and mysterious court joker. For the first time, she feels the pull of true attraction. At the risk of offending the king and infuriating her parents, she and Jest enter into an intense, secret courtship. Cath is determined to define her own destiny and fall in love on her terms. But in a land thriving with magic, madness, and monsters, fate has other plans. (summary via the publisher’s website)

Why We’re Excited: I could probably just say “new Marissa Meyer book!” and that’s all you would need to know, right? This is her first book that isn’t part of the Lunar Chronicles (although if the idea of no more Cinder has you down, don’t worry, she also has a graphic novel set in the same universe coming out in January), so it’ll be interesting to find out if she can recreate the magic of her debut. I have to confess that Alice in Wonderland doesn’t have quite the same resonance for me that Cinderella does, but I’m still curious to see what Meyer does with the story.

 

icon of VeronicaDid I get you interested in reading one of these books? Just click the title of the one you want and the link will take you to the relevant page in the catalog. From there you can click the green “Place a Hold” button and you’re all set!

Need a library card? Wondering how long you can borrow a book? Borrowing and Circulation information can be found here.

 

*”On the Radar” features book previews by Veronica, the Teen Librarian at the Dudley Branch, on the last Tuesday or Friday of every month.

Reading Backwards, Watching in Japanese: Mob Psycho 100, the Manga!

Posted on October 11th, 2016 by jkenney in Books, Resources, Reviews - Staff, Technology, Teen Services

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Happy Fall Otaku! I hope you all got to see Mob Psycho 100 on a streaming site. The first season is now over! So that was fast, but it did actually start in July. At this point I wondered, “what about the manga?” Well it doesn’t seem to be widely available  in the US. I won’t be able to order copies for the BPL, but it is online! Go and read on MangaFreak here. Unfortunately, it doesn’t actually read right to left (kuso!) but the browser is pretty nice. Go ahead and pop out the larger version. You can also find it here on MangaReader, but be wary of non-teen ads. It does work with AdBlock so you can try that too.

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Looking at the manga, you can see the basic art style in the story panels. Drawing is simplified line work with some more advanced light and shadow. More detail is given to the creepy spirit characters and psychic power effects.

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The online manga sites scan entire and partial softcover foldouts as you can see here below:


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So there you have it. The complete run of the manga is available on these online sties. The browsers work well and have high quality scans. The thumbnails were a little blurry for this post but don’t let that disappoint you. Click the images for full resolution. Go online and read Mob Psycho 100 backwards. The pages may flip left to right but the panels on each page are still right to left. Enjoy!

 

john250-150x150Did you know that in addition to physical books and DVDs, your library card gives you access to anime and graphic novels online? The BPL subscribes toHoopla, a streaming service that allows you to check out and enjoy the media you love on your computer, tablet or smartphone. You can learn more about the BPL’s digital media collections here.

Want company while you’re watching anime? The Hyde Park Teen Anime Club meets on Thursdays at 2:30 p.m.

*”Reading Backwards, Watching in Japanese” features reviews of anime and manga by John, the Teen Librarian at the Hyde Park Branch, on the second Tuesday of every month.