Now Read This! August 2021: Historical Fiction Recommendations

Our Now Read This! newsletters offer suggestions for your next favorite read, from hidden gems to the latest hot pick. Available in six genres, these newsletters include:

  • a featured book of the month
  • a special event worth checking out
  • a curated selection of newly acquired and upcoming titles
  • booklists for further reading

Whether you prefer reading about World War II or the Crusades, your friendly BPL Reader Services Librarians have recommendations for every reader.

Answer the questions and follow the arrows in the flowchart below to get a reading recommendation from this month's Historical Fiction newsletter. Sign up for our newsletters here.

Q1: Before or after 1900? Before → Q2: In the United States or Abroad? United States → Sunflower Sisters by Martha Hall Kelly → Abroad: Women of Troy by Pat Barker​ | After 1900 → Q3: Spy Thriller or Mystery? Spy Thriller → Our Woman in Moscow by Beatriz Williams → Mystery: A Peculiar Combination by Ashley Weaver

Sunflower Sisters

Kelly introduced us to American philanthropist Caroline Ferriday in her bestselling Lilac Girls. In Sunflower Sisters, she tells the story of Ferriday's ancestor, Georgeanna Woolsey, a Union nurse during the Civil War.

The Women of Troy

In this sequel to The Silence of the Girls, Booker Prize-winning author Barker continues her feminist retelling of Homer's Iliad from the perspective of the captured Trojan women.

Our Woman in Moscow

This Cold War-era spy thriller was inspired by the shocking true story of England's Cambridge spy ring.

A Peculiar Combination

Set in Britain during World War II, this first entry in a new mystery series features Electra McDonnell, a young Londoner who uses her unique skills as a safecracker to help the British war effort.

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