Now Read This! December 2021: Historical Fiction Recommendations

Our Now Read This! newsletters offer suggestions for your next favorite read, from hidden gems to the latest hot pick. Available in six genres, these newsletters include:

  • a featured book of the month
  • a special event worth checking out
  • a curated selection of newly acquired and upcoming titles
  • booklists for further reading

Whether you prefer reading about World War II or the Crusades, your friendly BPL Reader Services Librarians have recommendations for every reader.

Answer the questions and follow the arrows in the flowchart below to get a reading recommendation from this month's Historical Fiction newsletter. Sign up for our newsletters here.

Q1: Set in the United States or Abroad? United States -> Q2: Coming-of-Age Story or Spy Thriller? Coming-of-Age: The Family by Naomi Krupitsky | Spy Thriller: A Darker Reality by Anne Perry | Spy Thriller -> Q3: Fictionalized Biography or Noir Mystery? Biography: The Magician by Colm Tóibín | Noir Mystery: Velvet Was the Night by Silvia Moreno-Garcia.

The Family

Set in Brooklyn in the early 20th century, this is a coming-of-age story about two young Italian American women whose friendship is affected by their families' involvement in organized crime.

A Darker Reality

MI6 operative Elena Standish, on vacation in Washington, D.C., is asked to investigate the suspicious death of a British spy in this third entry in a popular 1930s British mystery series.

The Magician

Irish author Colm Tóibín explores the life and times of the famous German novelist Thomas Mann in this compelling fictionalized biography.

Velvet Was the Night

From the New York Times bestselling author of Mexican Gothic comes a riveting noir novel set in 1970s Mexico City at a time of student protest and political unrest.

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