Now Read This! Genre Newsletter September 2021: Biography & Memoir Recommendations

Our Now Read This! newsletters offer suggestions for your next favorite read, from hidden gems to the latest hot pick. Available in six genres, these newsletters include:

  • a featured book of the month
  • a special event worth checking out
  • a curated selection of newly acquired and upcoming titles
  • booklists for further reading

Whether you prefer reading about the lives of historical figures or the rich and famous, your friendly BPL Reader Services Librarians have recommendations for every reader.

Answer the questions and follow the arrows in the flowchart below to get a reading recommendation from this month's Biography & Memoir newsletter. Sign up for our newsletters here.

Q1: Natural World or Family History? Natural World → Q2: Hiking 2,190 Miles or Climbing Trees? → Hiking: The Appalachian Trail by Philip D'Anieri | Climbing Trees: The Arbornaut by Meg Lowman | → Family History → Q3: Tall Tales or Preserved Family Ties? Tall Tales → The Almost Legendary Morris Sisters by Julie Klam | Preserved Family Ties: All That She Carried by Tiya Miles.

This Month's Recommendations:

The Appalachian Trail

D'Anieri presents the backstories of the dreamers and builders who created the Appalachian Trail and the unforgettable characters who explored it, defined it, and captured national attention by hiking it.

The Arbornaut

A treetop scientist chronicles her story, taking us around the world and launching us into the life and work of a scientist and ecologist who offers hope despite devastation across the world.

The Almost Legendary Morris Sisters

With Klam's trademark wit and honesty, she tells the story of the Morris sisters, her distant relations with mysterious pasts, which brings about truth and self-discovery in this part memoir, part confessional.

All That She Carried

Miles shares the story of how three generations of Black women have passed down a family treasure—a sack filled with a few precious items given by an enslaved woman to her daughter in 1850s South Carolina.

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