Teen Volunteer Review: Beezus and Ramona

Boston Public Library's teen volunteer program has gone remote! As part of this program, local high schoolers share their thoughts on books, movies, and more on our blog. This week, Jalissa Martins, a student at Boston Collegiate Charter School, is sharing her review of the children's classic Beezus and Ramona.


In Ramona and Beezus by Beverly Cleary, Ramona is a four-year-old girl who drives her big sister nuts. She is full of energy and does all sorts of things that she shouldn't do. Beezus is a nine-year-old girl whose biggest trouble is her little sister, Ramona. At first Beezus doesn't like Ramona, but then figures out that her little sister really is not that bad.
 
Beezus doesn’t like Ramona at first because Ramona invades her personal space and tries to get into her business. For an example, Beezus and Ramona decide to make their own lemonade stand outside their house. Beezus has a huge crush on the neighbor (Henry). So when Ramona and Beezus are outside waiting for people to stop and buy some lemonade, Ramona sees Henry and tells Beezus.
 
Beezus tells her not to call him over, but of course Ramona does. Beezus tries to hide but Henry still sees her, so they offer him lemonade. While Beezus and Henry are drinking their lemonades, a fly flies into Beezus's cup. Ramona tells her, and she spits it out on Henry, and then he leaves. When they go back inside, Beezus feels so humiliated. Ramona goes to talk to her but Beezus tells her to get out and that she ruined her life.
 
Overall I really enjoyed this book. There is also a movie version of the book which I enjoyed. Both the movie and the book remind me of my little sister and me. The book displays a sisterly bond between two sisters with an age gap, which I related to as a realistic sibling relationship. I enjoyed reading about Beezus and Ramona getting into arguments and then making right up and having a great time together. Even though they argued a lot, Beezus and Ramona both always knew that they would make up in the end.
 
Beezus was really harsh on Ramona early in the book. Throughout the story, she ends up realizing that even though Ramona makes her mad a lot, they are still sisters at the end of the day. Ramona will always be in her life, so Beezus has to learn to not let things get her mad so easily. By the end of the book, Beezus and Ramona grow a bond that no one could ever break.
 
This was an inspiring and eye-opening book because no matter how much you and your siblings fight, you'll always be in each other's lives. The book sends a good message to make the best of things and try to get along with your siblings.
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