Bone-Chilling Chapter Books

Autumn is a great season to curl up on a couch and lose yourself in a scary tale. Many readers enjoy horror stories because they're a safe way to enjoy a dangerous situation. For children who like supernatural tales, we've got a bunch of them that are good and creepy. A warning, though -- these books might have your reader checking under the bed before they go to sleep at night! 

Spirit Hunters, by Ellen Oh, is the story of Harper, a twelve year old girl whose new house gives her the heebie-jeebies, even though her memories from before the move are hazy. And when her brother, Michael, finds an imaginary friend, he starts changing. Harper must overcome her fear to figure out what's going on. Can Harper figure out what's happening in time to save her brother?

Spirit Hunters

The Nest, by Kenneth Oppel, begins when wasps visit Steven in his dreams. Steven's new baby brother is very sick, and even the doctors aren't sure they can save him. But the wasp queen promises Steven that she can save his brother. Steven's "yes" answer may have a different outcome than he anticipated. 

The Nest

Nightlights is a graphic novel by Lorena Alvarez. This is one of my favorite recent graphic novels; the illustrations are lush and propel the story toward its conclusion. Sandy loves to draw, and uses her notebook to recreate the images she sees in her dreams. When a new girl, Morfie, appears in Sandy's class, Morfie's interest in Sandy's drawings starts off exciting but quickly turns sinister. 

Nightlights

The Jumbies by Tracey Baptiste is a lush and creepy story about the brave Corinne La Mer. When a beautiful stranger comes to Corinne's town, she starts intruding on Corinne's life. With a vast number of mythical creatures, Baptiste's island world is captivating and will leave your reader rushing to read the sequel. 

The Jumbies

If you like these books and want more like them, you can always request personalized recommendations from a librarian here. Let us know what you're looking for! 

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