Teen Volunteer Review: The Mother-in-Law

Boston Public Library's teen volunteer program has gone remote! As part of this program, local high schoolers will be sharing their thoughts on books, movies, and more on our blog. In today's review, Edward M. Kennedy freshman Mariam Joumal share her thoughts on the popular thriller The Mother-in-Law.


The book I will be reviewing is The Mother-in-Law by Sally Hepworth. This book was a page-turner and worth the read. If you are into thriller/suspense stories, especially domestic suspense, then this book will fulfill your every desire. It is about Lucy, a woman who doesn't get along with her mother-in-law, Diana. Then Diana is found dead and the mystery begins. Other drama comes from one of the characters who is childless and unable to accept that she is infertile, which takes a surprising turn.
 
The book switches perspectives between different main characters to tell their stories. We learn more and more from each character. The character that I got attached to the most was the mother-in-law, Diana. I have always loved the name Diana, so she immediately had a special place in my heart. Her character is so perfectly written and the suspense surrounding her is everything!
 
This book has a lot of plot twists. It is enough to keep you hooked and unable to put it down. I promise you the suspense never ends. Each character’s part in the mystery is so interesting and intriguing until the end.
 
Some might say this is a book for adults, but I think teens will enjoy it too. I sincerely recommend you check out this wonderful book! I really hope it will be made into a movie someday; it is worth all the work. I would love if they could get the story and cast right because it would be a big hit! After reading this book, Sally Hepworth's other book The Family Next Door is on my list to read.
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