The Anti-slavery Fair

Female abolitionists played a key role in the abolitionist movement. In 1833, a group of Boston women decided to form their own organization. It was called the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, and it had both white and black members. The organization looked for ways to support the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society (a local branch of the…
View More about The Anti-slavery Fair

The Liberator

  From 1831 to 1865, William Lloyd Garrison, a vocal white abolitionist, edited a weekly newspaper, titled The Liberator, in Boston, Massachusetts. When other abolitionists supported a slow end to slavery, Garrison vowed from the very first issue of The Liberator to “strenuously contend for the immediate enfranchisement of our slave populations,” which was a…
View More about The Liberator

The American Anti-Slavery Almanac

When transcribing letters from the Anti-Slavery Manuscripts project, you may come across letters in which important figures, such as Lydia Maria Child, discuss the American Anti-Slavery Almanac. On June 20, 1860, Child wrote to William Lloyd Garrison about an almanac they planned to publish, asking Garrison, “How many pages do you propose to have?...If you…
View More about The American Anti-Slavery Almanac

Moderating on the Talk Boards for the Anti-Slavery Manuscripts Transcription Project

Joanna Treasure has been one of our most active and reliable moderators for the Anti-Slavery manuscript transcription project. In this role, she takes questions and addresses concerns from other Zooniverse volunteer transcribers. Zooniverse projects often include moderators who have been recruited from the active participants. This shows that that the management of the project is…
View More about Moderating on the Talk Boards for the Anti-Slavery Manuscripts Transcription Project

Anti-Slavery Manuscripts: How We’re Dividing the Data

A note from IMLS Postdoctoral Fellow, Samantha Blickhan on the logic behind how we decided to make a fairly large collection of manuscripts more manageable in our transcription project: Crowdsourcing can be an effective tool for classifying really large datasets, and Anti-Slavery Manuscripts (ASM) is no exception. The dataset is made up of about 12,000 letters written during the 19th…
View More about Anti-Slavery Manuscripts: How We’re Dividing the Data

8th graders in Missouri transcribe anti-slavery documents and learn about the abolitionist movement

Dr. Lisa Gilbert, a Social Studies teacher in St. Louis, Missouri, recently tweeted about her experience with her 8th grade class transcribing and examining some of the BPL’s anti-slavery manuscripts. She blogs about it here... As a social studies teacher, I hope for my students to develop an appreciation of the discipline of history itself…
View More about 8th graders in Missouri transcribe anti-slavery documents and learn about the abolitionist movement

Anti-Slavery Manuscripts now available for the public to transcribe

For the past several years, we have been carefully cataloging and digitizing manuscript correspondences from our Anti-Slavery collection. These items document the thoughts, transactions, and activities of the abolitionist movement in Boston, Massachusetts, and throughout New England. Over 12,000 of these letters were recently made available on Digital Commonwealth. This work was made possible through…
View More about Anti-Slavery Manuscripts now available for the public to transcribe
1 - 7 of 7